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Full text of "Town of Cohasset (Mass.) Annual Report"

^0SS^ 




ANNUAL REPORT 
1970 



Sn JH. 



emoriayn 



Manuel p. Silvia Died January 9, 1970 

William H. Taylor, Jr. Died January 18, 1970 

Clifford E. Studley .Died June 4, 1970 

Frederick A. Thayer Died June 17, 1970 

William F. McAuliffee Died July 2, 1970 

MajorieFay Died September 2, 1970 

Howard Bates Died December 18, 1970 



THIS 1970 REPORT OF THE TOWN OF COHASSET IS DEDICATED TO THE 
MEMORY OF THE MEN WHO HAVE DIED IN THE SERVICE DURING THE 
VIET NAM WAR 





Dennis J. Reardon 



R. Edward Maree 





) 




Peter Cogill 



John Paul Lyon 




^ ^ 



NO PICTURE AVAILABLE 



Craig M. Simeone 



Peter J. Albiani, Jr. 






Allen F. Keating 



William C. Laidlaw 



ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

Board of Selectmen 

Of the Financial Affairs 

OF THE 

TOWN OF COHASSET 

Reports of The School Committee 

AND THE 

Reports of Other Town Officers 




FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31 



1970 



TOWN OFFICERS 

1970- 1971 

ELECTED BY BALLOT 

MODERATOR 

David E. Place Term expires March 1972 

SELECTMEN 

George W. McLaughlin Term expires March 1971 

Arthur L. Clark Term expires March 1972 

Mary Jeanette Murray Term expires March 1973 

ASSESSORS 

Louis A. LaugelH Term expires March 1971 

Warren S. Pratt Term expires March 1 972 

Michael C. Patrolia Term expires March 1 973 

TREASURER 

David E. Truesdell Term expires March 1973 

TOWN COLLECTOR 

Gordon E. Flint Term expires March 1973 

TREE WARDEN 

Louis C. Bailey, Jr Term expires March 1 97 1 

HIGHWAY SURVEYOR 

Louis C. Bailey, Jr Term expires March 1972 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

T. Gerard Keating Term expires March 1971 

John P. Rear don Term expires March 1971 

Ellen P. Smith Term expires March 1972 

Sumner Smith, Jr Term expires March 1972 

Daniel C. Cotton Term expires March 1973 

David C. SWhipple Term expires March 1973 

7 



TRUSTEES OF COHASSET FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY 

Emily B. Gleason Term expires March 1971 

Phyllis P. Godwin Term expires March 1971 

Lloyd C. Trott Term expires March 1971 

Sheila S. Evans Term expires March 1972 

Donald R. Hammonds Term expires March 1972 

Bettina H. Pratt Term expires March 1972 

John Bishop Term expires March 1973 

Richard D. Leggat Term expires March 1973 

Richard B. Singer Term expires March 1973 

BOARD OF HEALTH 

Edward A. McCarthy Term expires March 1971 

William J. Montuori Term expires March 1972 

Rene G. Chiasson Term expires March 1973 

PLANNING BOARD 

Julian Rifkin Term expires March 1971 

Nathan W. Bates Term expires March 1972 

G. Scott Steeves Term expires March 1973 

Lawrence D. Ainslie Term expires March 1974 

Henry R. Hidell, III Term expires March 1975 

WATER COMMISSIONERS 

Alan S. Murphy, Jr Term expires March 1971 

Henry W. Ainslie, Jr Term expires March 1972 

Rocco F. Laugelle Term expires March 1973 



RECREATION COMMISSION 

Dennis W. Kuntz Term expires March 1971 

Hamilton T. Tweksbury Term expires March 1972 

Robert L. Pennington Term expires March 1973 

William G. O'Brien Term expires March 1974 

Arthur P. McCarthy Term expires March 1975 

SOUTH SHORE REGIONAL SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

John A. Geary Term expires March 1972 



COHASSET HOUSING AUTHORITY 

Samuel Hassan Term expires March 1971 

Margaret A. Lynch Term expires March 1972 

W. Chester Browne Term expires March 1974 

James R. DeGiacomo Term expires March 1975 



TOWN OFFICERS APPOINTED BY SELECTMEN 

TOWN ACCOUNTANT UNDER CIVIL SERVICE 

William S. Signorelli 

REGISTRARS OF VOTERS 

Clarence M. Grassie Term expires March 1971 

Louise E. Conroy Term expires March 1972 

Dorothy Wadsworth Term expires March 1973 

ADVISORY COMMITTEE - Appointed by Chairman of 
Selectmen, Chairman of Advisory Committee & Moderator 

Robert S. Pape Term expires March 1971 

Oliver W. Park Term expires March 1971 

Danforth B. Lincoln Term expires March 1971 

Arnold N. Weeks Term expires March 1972 

John Patrolia Term expires March 1972 

L. Emmett Holt, III Term expires March 1972 

Joseph Barresi Term expires March 1973 

Thomas F. Clark Term expires March 1973 

Jerome R. Tosi Term expires March 1973 

CHIEF OF POLICE UNDER CIVIL SERVICE 

Randolph A. Feola 

POLICE LIEUTENANT UNDER CIVIL SERVICE 

Thomas B. Kane 

SERGEANTS OF POLICE 
UNDER CIVIL SERVICE 

Richard P. Barrow Charles E. Stockbridge 



PATROLMEN UNDER CIVIL SERVICE 

Louis J. Simeone Frederick L. Huntwork 

Carmelo Conte Joseph M. Kealey 

Brian Cogill Robert A. Goyette 

Clifton B. Jones David J. Moir 

John J. Rhodes, 3rd Randolph A. Feola, Jr. 
Bartholomew P. Winn 

SPECIAL POLICE OFFICERS 
ASSIGNED TO THE POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Benjamin F. Curley, Jr. Arthur J. Dixon, Jr. 

Joseph S. Laugelle John E. Kenney 

SPECIAL POLICE OFFICERS 

Harry H. Ritter Harbor Master 

Chfford J. Dickson Assistant Harbor Master and 

Cohasset Yackt Club 

Ellery C. S. Sidney Shellfish Constable 

William G. Stone Assistant Harbor Master 

Louis C. Bailey, Jr Highway Surveyor 

Charles Piepenbrink Fire Chief 

Edward P. Malley Superintendent of Wires 

Edwin H. Pratt Superintendent of Water Department 

T. Gerard Keating Director of Civil Defense 

Louis N. Simeone Deputy Director of Civil Defense 

J. Nelson Patrolia Gas Inspector 

Benjamin F. Curley, Jr Sealer of Weights & Measures 

James M. Hurley Custodian, Town Hall 

Theodore O. Macklin Cohasset Sailing Club 

Richard Lincoln Cohasset Golf Club 

Arthur Washburn Cohasset Golf Club 

Austin L. Ahearn, Jr Private 

Charles E. Butman Private 

Ralph S. Enos Private 

Norman G. Grassie Private 

George E. Haley Private 

David C. Place Private 

Robert B. James Private 

Frank E. Jason Private 

Manuel A. Marks Private 

George S. Jason Private 

D. Bruce McLean Private 

Stephen H. Rooney Private 

John W. Trayers Private 



10 



Richardson White Private 

Joseph A. Silvia Private 

Harold W. Litchfield Private 

Eric G. Pearson Wheelwright Park 

Frank Loiacono, Jr Private 

LOCKUP KEEPERS 

Randolph A. Feola Thomas B. Kane 

DOG OFFICERS 

Randolph A. Feola Charles Stockbridge 

Frederick L. Huntwork David J. Moir 

Clifton B. Jones 

FOREST WARDEN 

Charles Piepenbrink 

LOCAL SUPERINTENDENT OF INSECT PEST CONTROL 

Lawrence Figuerido 

DIRECTOR OF CIVIL DEFENSE 

T. Gerard Keating 

DEPUTY DIRECTOR OF CIVIL DEFENSE 

Louis N. Simeone 

AGENT FOR GROUP AND HEALTH INSURANCE 
FOR TOWN EMPLOYEES 

Paul Blackmur 

TOWN COUNSEL 

J. Blake Thaxter, Jr. 

SEALER OF WEIGHTS & MEASURES 

Benjamin F. Curley, Jr. 



11 



Louis C. Bailey, Jr. 



John W. Trayers 



Henry R. Eastman 

Frank Infusino 
Clifford Studley 

Stanley L. Toombs 

Ralph Enos 



SUPERINTENDENT OF WIRES 

Edward P. Malley 

MEASURES OF WOOD AND BARK 

Richardson White 

VETERANS' BURIAL AGENT 

Gordon E. Flint 

CONSTABLE 

Robert N. Rooney 

INSPECTOR OF PUBLIC BUILDINGS 

Charles Piepenbrink 

CARETAKERS 



Superintendent, Woodside Cemetery & 

Caretaker of Veteran's Lots 

Woodside Cemetery 

Town Commons & Small Parks 

Wadleigh Park and Green Gate 

I Cemetery. Died June 4, 1970 

Wadleigh Park and 

Green Gate Cemetery 

Norman Todd Park 

DIRECTOR OF VETERANS' AFFAIRS 

Gordon E. Flint 

FENCE VIEWERS 



Anthony Emanuello 



John Winters 



Burtram J. Pratt 

HARBOR MASTER 

Harry H. Ritter 



12 



ASSISTANT HARBOR MASTER 

Clifford J. Dickson William G. Stone 

SHELLFISH CONSTABLE 

Ellery C. S. Sidney 

PUBLIC WEIGHERS 8l WEIGHERS OF COAL 

Walter C. Wheelwright Dorothy C. Wood 

GAS INSPECTOR 

J. Nelson Patrolia 

CUSTODIAN OF TOWN HALL 

James M. Hurley 

HONORARY TOWN ENGINEER 

Gilbert S. Tower 

COMMISSIONER OF SOUTH SHORE MOSQUITO PROJECT 

Lawrence Figueiredo 

BOARD OF APPEALS 

Roger B. Coulter Arthur L. Lehr, Jr. 

James M. Graham, Jr. 



ASSOCIATE MEMBERS 

Robert Cleaves, Jr. Resigned January 13, 1970 

Roberts. Booth, Jr. 

ORGANIZATION OF BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

George W. McLaughlin, Chairman Arthur L. Clark 

Mary Jeanette Murray 
Estelle H. Fandel, Secretary resigned September 16, 1970 

Eileen M. Jacome appointed September 28, 1970 



13 



ORGANIZATION OF BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

Warren S. Pratt, Chairman Louis A. Laugelli 

Michael C. Patrolia Dorothy V. Graham, Clerk 

Mary F. Kavaney, Assistant Clerk Assistant Clerk 

SCHOOL FACILITIES COMMITTEE 

UNDER ARTICLE 42, MARCH MEETING, 1960 

APPOINTED BY THE MODERATOR 

Lot E. Bates, Jr. David C. Whipple, Chairman 

Alexander Boyt, Jr. resigned Feb. 20, 1970 

Barbara W. Bliss appointed June 1 1 , 1970 

APPOINTED BY THE BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Barbara M. Power Sheila S. Evans 

Albert P. Buckley resigned October 1, 1970 

APPOINTED BY THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Sumner Smith, Jr. 

Austin L. Ahearn, Jr. resigned March 18, 1970 

John P. Reardon resigned July 9, 1970 

John F. Keane appointed June 11,1 970 

PERSONNEL COMMITTEE 

APPOINTED BY THE CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

THE TOWN MODERATOR AND CHAIRMAN OF THE ADVISORY 

COMMITTEE 
UNDER ARTICLE 5, MARCH MEETING 1957 

G. Heyward Howkins, Chairman Term expires 1971 

Ira B. P. Stoughton, Jr Term expires 1972 

William F. McDermott Term expires 1972 

Robert D. Canty Term expires 1973 

James D. Gillespie Term expires 1973 

COMMITTEE TO STUDY, INVESTIGATE AND CONSIDER 

THE SUBJECT OF DREDGING, IMPROVEMENT AND 

ENLARGEMENT OF COHASSET HARBOR 

UNDER ARTICLE 27, MARCH MEETING 1957 

Harry H. Ritter Harbor Master 

George W. McLaughlin, Chairman Board of Selectmen 

John Bishop, Jr. Commondore of Yacht Club 

Scott Steeves Chairman, Planning Board 

14 



AT THE REQUEST OF THE MASSACHUSETTS TRANSPORTATION 
COMMISSION TO REPRESENT THE TOWN OF COHASSET 
IN THE GREATER BOSTON REGION APPOINTED BY THE 
. BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

George W. McLaughlin Chairman, Board of Selectmen 

G. Scott Steeves Chairman, Planning Board 

Louis F. Eaton, Jr. 

PUBLIC SEWERAGE SYSTEM STUDY COMMITTEE 
UNDER ARTICLE 30, MARCH MEETING, 1960 

Rene Chiasson Chairman 

Edward A. McCarthy, M.D. Chairman, Board of Health 

Mary Jeanette Murray Board of Selectmen 

Board of Health 

John A. Calabro Planning Board 

William Morton William Morton 

Rocco F. Laugelle Board of Sewer Commissioners 

CONSERVATION COMMISSION 
UNDER ARTICLE 34, MARCH MEETING, 1961 

George W. Benedict Term expires 1971 

John Chase Term expires 1971 

Penelope G. Place Term expires 1972 

John F. Hubbard, Chairman Term expires 1972 

Edward F. Woods Term expires 1973 

John K. Bryant Term expires 1973 

Herbert B. Marsh Term expires 1973 

HONORARY ASSOCIATE MEMBER 

Charles L. Smith, Jr. 

COMMITTEE OF FIVE MEMBERS ON TOWN LAND AND 

WATER SUPPLY REQUIREMENTS 

UNDER ARTICLE 35, MARCH MEETING, 1967 

Herbert B. Marsh John E. Kenney 

Yolanda I. Baccari Alan S. Murphy, Jr. 

John E. Souther 

COMMITTEE OF FIVE CITIZENS TO SURVEY THE 

ADMINISTRATIVE FUNCTIONING OF THE VARIOUS 

TOWN OFFICES, BOARDS, AND DEPARTMENTS 

15 



APPOINTED BY THE MODERATOR ,THE CHAIRMAN OF 

THE BOARD OF SELECTMEN AND CHAIRMAN OF THE 

ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

UNDER ARTICLE 46, MARCH MEETING, 1967 



Philip N. Bowditch, Chairman 
Margaret R. Charles 
Stewart D. Sargent 



Chairman 

Richard D. Leggat 

Edwin A. Young 



BICENTENNIAL COMMITTEE 

APPOINTED BY THE MODERATOR 

UNDER RESOLUTION, 

MARCH 1967 ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 



Burtram J. Pratt 
Mary Jane E, McArthur 
Prescott T. Cumner 
A. J. Antoine, Jr. 

Sheldon N. Ripley 
Arthur Taft Mahoney 
Paul Blackmur 



Chairman 

Vice Chairman 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Director 

Director 

Director 



BUILDING CODE COMMITTEE 



Charles T. Patrolia, Chairman 
William R. Hooper 
Irwin D. Matthew 



Chairman 
Earle W. Higgins 
Joseph E. Wood 



BUILDING INSPECTOR 
APPOINTED BY THE BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



Maurice O'Donnell 



Appointed August 5, 1970 



COUNCIL FOR AGING 
APPOINTED BY THE BOARD OF SELECTMEN: 



Arlene S. Cline, Chairman 
EHnor I. Kennedy 
Thomas Twitchell 
Karl T. Kristiansen 
Frances Antonie 



Chairman 

Albert Livingston 

Rev. Edward T. Atkinson 

Kathleen Conte 

EUzabeth J. Alemian 



16 



MEMBERS OF THE HOUSING AUTHORITY 

UNDER ARTICLE 36, 1969 TOWN MEETING 

APPOINTED BY THE BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

W. Chester Browne, Chairman . . . • Term expires 1974 

Samuel Hassan Term expires 1971 

Margaret Lynch Term expires 1 972 

James R. DeGiacomo .Term expires 1975 

HOUSING AUTHORITY 

Mary Jeanette Murray appointed by the Governor 

Term expires 1972 

COMMITTEE TO MAKE A STUDY OF TOWN OWNED BUILDINGS 
UNDER ARTICLE 42, MARCH MEETING 1969 
APPOINTED BY THE BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Philip G. Facey, Jr., Chairman Chairman 

Wilkin Lawrence S. Gates 

James A. Litchfield Orin E. Huston 

VETERAN MEMORIAL COMMITTEE 
APPOINTED BY THE MODEIUTOR 
UNDER RESOLUTION SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
DECEMBER 1969 

Glenn A. Pratt, Chairman Clarence M. Grassie 

Norbert V. Reardon III Leo J. Fiori 

Rocco F. Laugelle G. Lawrence Keating 

James E. Tyeryar Brian Wilkin 

Edward F. Logan Gerard J. Stanton Jr. 

C. Arthur McCarthy Wayne Sawchuk 

John L. Mello James A. Litchfield 
Brian Cogill Joseph Hagan, Youth Representative 



COMMITTEE TO STUDY THE GOVERNMENT 

ISLAND PROPERTY 
APPOINTED BY THE BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Gerard Stanton Mary Jane E. McArthur 

Figueiredo Prescott T. Cumner 

Richard C. Tousley Clifford J. Dickson 

Frederic Wood, Jr. John H. Barrett 



17 



JURY LIST FOR 1970 



NAME 

Alexander, Arthur D. 
Berry, Jack R. 
Brown, Norman W. 
Burke, John V. 
Carlson, Paul A. 
Cherry, Jay L. 
Clark, Donald S. 
Coblentz, Abraham S. 
Cowdrey, Robert S. 
Dockendorff, Hazel 
Dolan, James E. 
Emmons, John G. 
Facey, Patricia G. 
Fisher, Edward F. 
Gibbons, Robert E. 
Gilman, Walter G. 
Gjesteby, Arne 
Goodwin, Gordon L. 
Gunville, Frances D. 
Healy, Thomas M., Jr. 
Henn, Robert J. 
Hough, Yvonne E. 
Howe, John F. 
Jackman, John E. 
James, Robert B. 
Jones, Paul, Jr. 
Kravette, Norma I. 
Laugelle, Rocco F. 
Lennon, James R. 
MacLure, Laurens 
Mahoney, Mary Ann 
Maichle, Henry R. 
Marsh, Russell E. 
Mayer, Bernard J., Jr. 
McCarthy, Alice M. 
McCarthy, Charles A. 
Meyer, John H. 
Miller, Albert D. 
Mitchell, Ruth 
Orr, George W. 
Orton, Samuel T. 
Park, Christine W. 
Pierce, Charles A. 
Power, Jeffrey R. 
Ripley, Sheldon N. 
Rose, Harry W. 
Salvador, Manuel E. 
Sampson, Kenneth A. 
Sands, Arthur F. 
Sawchuk, Michael 
Simonds Henry G., Jr. 



ADDRESS 

24 Rust Way 

30 Windy Hill Rd. 

7 Windsor Rd. 

46 Stockbridge St. 

64 Summer St. 
321 South Main St. 
23 Highland Ave. 
46 Brewster Rd. 

812 C. J. Gushing Way 
Ledgewood Drive 
66 Spring St. 
1 1 1 Black Rock Rd. 
4 Woodland Drive 
40 Norfolk Rd. 
215 South Main St. 

20 Brewster Rd. 

81 Old Pasture Rd. 

15 Buttonwood Lane 
55 Pleasant St. 

49 Gushing Rd. 
90 Doane St. 

21 Pleasant St. 
20 Hobart Ln. 

14 Stockbridge St. 
12 Ripley Rd. 
45 Fairoaks Lane 
80 Summer St. 
18 Norfolk Rd. 

20 Tad Lane 
183 Sohier St. 
28 Otis Ave. 

16 Wood Way 

438 Beechwood St. 
76A Beach St. 
51 Hill St. 

17 Bayberry Lane 
181 Border St. 

11 Bailey Rd. 

21 Brewster Rd. 

8 Sankey Rd. 

17 Windy Hill Rd. 
30 King St. 

65 Windy Hill Rd. 
35 Stevens Lane 
63 Sohier St. 

14 Highland Court 
28 Elm Court 
32 Hill St. 
20 Church St. 
302 North Main St. 
62 Whitehead Road 



OCCUPATION 

Executive 

Vice President 

Dir. of Development 

Iron Worker 

Manager 

Adv. Manager 

Engineer 

Manager 

Maintenance Engineer 

Housewife 

Horseman 

General Manager 

Housewife 

Maintenance 

Investment Banker 

Chauffeur 

Importer 

Mechanic 

Retired 

Telephone Installer 

Retired 

Clerk 

Manager 

Foreman 

Retired 

Shoe Business 

Housewife 

Lineman 

Telephone Repairman 

Vice President 

Housewife 

Engineer 

Electrician's Helper 

Vice President 

Teacher 

Electrician 

Executive 

Optician 

Housewife 

Draftsman 

Real Estate 

Housewife 

Actuary 

Advertising 

Advertising 

Manager 

Fisherman 

Rubber Worker 

Retired 

Electrician 

Investment Counselor 



18 



Soule, George E. 
Stevens, Malcolm H. 
Thompson, Leslie G. 
Tibbetts, Vernon 
Townley, Lawrence E. 
Treanor, John P. 
Watson, William A. 
White, John J. 
White, William H. 
Whitley, Roger S. 
Wilson, Robert 1. 
Winters, Ruth G. 
Wright, John A. 



41 Spring St. 
268 Becchwood St. 
56 Oak St. 
45 Church St. 
6 Woodland Drive 
56 Summer St. 
244 King St. 
62 Church St. 
123 Pleasant St. 

1 1 Cedar Lane 

2 Spindrift Lane 
13 Pratt Court 

6 Reservoir Rd. 



Maintenance 

Retired 

I'oreman 

Lead Man 

Claim Director Ins. 

Systems Analyst 

Salesman 

Machinist 

Newspaper Man 

Arciiitcct 

Commercial Artist 

Housewife 

Engineer 



ELECTION OFFICERS AND TELLERS APPOINTED 
FOR THE YEAR 1970 



Manuel A. Marks, Warden 

Anthony J. Rosano, Deputy Warden 

Edward E. Tower, Clerk 

Arthur L. Lehr, Jr., Deputy Clerk 

Thomas M. Healy, Jr., Inspector 

Mary N. Grassie, Inspector 

Grace E. Bowser, Deputy Inspector 

Robert A. Leonard, Deputy Inspector 

Thomas J. Silvia, Alternate Inspector 

Irma M. James, Alternate Inspector 

Ann E. Leonard, Alternate Deputy Inspector 

Samuel Hassan, Alternate Deputy Inspector 

Margaret V. Marks 

William Broderick 

Frances R. Antonine 

Frank 0. Pattison 

Frances L. Marks 

Marjorie E. Antoine 

Florence Protulis 

Ethel Edwards 

Mamie F. Keegan 

Margaret J. Laugelle 

Teresa M. Perroncello 

Joan St. John 

Helena F. Enos 

Ellen Gentile 

Marjorie Wilbur 

Jane Marsh 

Margaret Stoughton 

Mary Kaveney 

Jeanne M. Sullivan 



Rosalie Fitzpatrick 

Margaret C. Hernan 

Marjorie J. Emanuello 

Frank E. Jason 

Joseph H. Patrolia 

Dorothy C. Bjorkgren 

Geraldine McEwan 

Dorothy C. Morse 

Barbara A. Williams 

Eileen M. Buckley 

Mary D. Migliaccio 

Louise A. Flint 

Mary M. Grassie 

Janice K. Woods 

Mary Isabelle Ainslie 

Jane B. Tilden 

Ruth R. Simeone 

Pauline Sestito 

Margaret E. Buckley 

Virginia F. Huntwork 

Domenic M. Baccari 

Nancy E. Sladen 

Edward T. Mulvey 

Mary M. Brennock 

Patricia Chase Buckley 

Arlene T. Stockbridge 

Mildred F. Collins 

Jane M. Trettis 

Maria R. Pape 

Marjorie F. Ritter 

Barbara S. Clark 



19 



TOWN CLERK'S REPORT 

At the Annual Town Meeting held at the Joseph Osgood School at 8:00 
P.M., March 7, 1970, the following articles were contained in the Warrant and 
acted upon as recorded. 

Checkers previously appointed for entrance by the Selectmen and sworn in 
by Town Clerk Charles A. Marks at 1:00 P.M. were Margaret Buckley, Isabella 
Ainslie, Mary N. Grassie, Barbara Williams, Margaret C. Hernan and Marjorie 
Wilbur. 

Tellers appointed by the Moderator and sworn in by the Town Clerk at 
1:15 P.M. were Frank E. Jason, Arthur L. Lehr, Jr., Thomas J. Silvia and 
Edward E. Tower. 

The number of voters present as checked on the incoming voting lists was 
594. 

The meeting was called to order at 2: 15 P.M. by Moderator David E. Place 
and the Town Clerk proceeded to read the call of the meeting. 

The invocation was given by Rev. Max Munro. 

ARTICLE 1. To choose all Town Officers not required to be elected by 
ballot. 

VOTED, unanimously by a voice vote, that the Selectmen be and hereby 
are authorized and directed to appoint all Town Officers not required to be 
elected by ballot. 

ARTICLE 2. To act upon the reports of the various Town Officers as 
printed in the Annual Town Report for the year 1969. 

Voted unanimously by a voice vote, that the reports of the various Town 
Officers as printed in the Annual Town Report for the year 1969 be and hereby 
are accepted. 

ARTICLE 3. To hear the report of any committee heretofore chosen and 
act thereon. 

SCHOOL FACILITIES COMMITTEE 
VOTED, unanimously be a voice vote, that the report of progress be 
accepted and the committee be continued. 

PERSONNEL COMMITTEE 

VOTED unanimously be a voice vote, that the report of progress be 
accepted and the committee be continued. 



20 



COMMITTEE TO STUDY, INVESTIGATE AND CONSIDER THE SUBJECT 
OF DREDGING, IMPROVEMENT AND ENLARGEMENT OF COHASSET HARBOR 

VOTED unanimously by a voice vote, ttiat the report of progress be 
accepted and the committee be continued. 

TRANSPORTATION COMMITTEE 

VOTED unanimously by a voice vote, that the report of progress be 
accepted and the committee be continued. 

PUBLIC SEWERAGE SYSTEM STUDY COMMITTEE 

VOTED unanimously be a voice vote, that the report of progress be 
accepted and the committee be continued. 

CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

VOTED unanimously by a voice vote, that the report of progress be 
accepted and the committee be continued. 

TOWN LAND AND WATER SUPPLY COMMITTEE 

VOTED unanimously by a voice vote, that the report of progress be 
accepted and the committee be continued. 

COMMITTEE TO SURVEY THE ADMINISTRATIVE FUNCTIONING OF THE 
VARIOUS TOWN OFFICES, BOARDS, AND DEPARTMENTS 

VOTED by a voice vote, that the report of progress be accepted and the 
committee be continued. 

BICENTENIAL COMMITTEE 

VOTED unanimously be a voice vote, that the report of progress be 
accepted and the committee be continued. 

BUILDING CODE COMMITTEE 

Voted unanimously be a voice vote, that the report of progress be 
accepted and the committee be continued. 



21 



COUNCIL FOR THE AGING 

Voted unanimously by a voice vote, that the report of progress be 
accepted and the committee be continued. 

MEMBERS OF THE HOUSING AUTHORITY 

VOTED unanimously by a voice vote, that the report of progress be 
accepted and the committee be continued. 

COMMITTEE TO MAKE A STUDY OF TOWN OWNED BUILDINGS 

VOTED unanimously by a voice vote, that the report of progress be 
accepted and the committee be continued. 

Moved and voted unanimously by a voice vote, that Article 34 be acted on 
out of order and be acted on at this time. 

Voted unanimously be a vote in the affirmative. 

ARTICLE 34. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Town of 
Cohasset, Massachusetts Personnel Classification & Compensation Plan By-Law 
by reducing the hours of work for the personnel of the Fire Department from 
the present 56 hours to 50.4 hours, said change in hours to become effective, if 
voted by the Town Meeting as soon as two additional firefighters are appointed 
and it becomes practical for the Fire Chief to arrange the necessary scheduling 
therefore; and to see if the Town will raise and/or appropriate a sum of money 
therefore, which sum shall be added to the salaries and wage account of the Fire 
Department, or act on anything relating thereto. 

Voted unanimously by a voice vote, that this article be indefinitely 
postponed. 

Moved and voted unanimously by a voice vote, that Article 37 be acted on 
our of order and be acted on at this time. 

ARTICLE 37. To see if the Town will vote to raise and/orappropriate the 
sum of $11,200.00 so as to provide an $800.00 increase in pay to each of 14 
regular members of the Police Department and to amend Schedule No. 2 of the 
Town's Personnel Classification By-Law to provide said $800.00 raise in each 
pay classification and rate, or to act on anything relative thereto. 

VOTED unanimously by a voice vote, that the article be indefinitely 
postponed. 

ARTICLE 4. To hear and act upon the report and recommendation of the 
Personnel Committee and to see if the Town will vote to amend its Personnel 
Classification By-Law Schedule by adopting, or amending and adopting and 
inserting and substituting the following schedule for the schedule heretofore 
adopted, or act on anything relating thereto. 



22 



Moved that the report and recommendations of the Personnel Committee 
with respect to amending the Personnel Classification By-Law Schedule is hereby 
amended by inserting, adopting and substituting the following schedule for the 
schedule heretofore adopted. 

SALARY SCHEDULE 



Schedule No. 


1 


Hourly 




1970 


Pay Group 


Min. Rate 


1st Step 


2nd Step 


Max. Rate 


SI 


2.26 


2.33 


2.41 


2.48 


S2 


2.33 


2.41 


2.48 


2.63 


S3 


2.40 


2.48 


2.63 


2.78 


S4 


2.48 


2.63 


2.78 


2.94 


S5 


2.63 


2.78 


2.94 


3.08 


S6 


2.78 


2.94 


3.08 


3.24 


S7 


2.94 


3.08 
Annual 


3.24 


3.40 


S8 


6,944 


7,205 


7,442 


7,690 


S9 


7,402 


7,619 


7,833 


8,050 


SIO 


7,827 


8,064 


8,301 


8,539 


Sll 


8,158 


8,408 


8,660 


8,912 


S12 


8,668 


8,940 


9,212 


9,487 


S13 


8,912 


9,199 


9,486 


9,795 


S14 


9,444 


9,833 


10,222 


10,607 


S15 


9,761 


10,146 


10,535 


10,924 


Schedule No. 


,2 


Hourly and Annual 






Pay Group 


Min. Rate 


1st Step 


2nd Step 


Max. Rate 


PS9 


3.81/7926 


3.91/8123 


4.00/8329 


4.10/8515 


PSll 


4.14/8613 


4.25/8841 


4.36/9068 


4.47/9297 


PS12 


4.53/9418 


4.59/9559 


4.72/9821 


4.86/10081 


PS15 


10070 


10421 


10775 


11127 


Schedule No. 


3 


Hourly and Annual 


I 




FS9 


2.72/7926 


2.79/8123 


2.85/8329 


2.93/8515 


FSll 


2.96/8613 


3.04/8841 


3.12/9068 


3.20/9297 


FS12 


3.23/9418 


3.28/9559 


3.38/9821 


3.46/10081 




10070 


10421 


10775 


11127 



23 



The annual pay is the standard 
The hourly pay is calculated to the nearest penny 



Schedule No. 


4 


Hourly 






Pay Group 


Min. Rate 


1st Step 


2nd Step 


Max. Rate 


Wl 


2.55 


2.63 


2.74 


2.82 


W2 


2.71 


2.80 


2.90 


2.99 


W3 


2.84 


2.94 


3.05 


3.14 


W4 


2.99 


3.08 


3.16 


3.28 


W5 


3.14 


3.23 


3.33 


3.42 


W6 


3.24 


3.35 


3.43 


3.54 


W7 


3.31 


3.39 


3.46 


3.59 


W8 


3.33 


3.42 


3.50 


3.63 


W9 


3.45 


3.55 


3.61 


3.73 


WIO 


3.60 


3.68 


3.77 


3.87 


Schedule No 


.5 


Part Time Positions 


Rate 



Caretaker of Perkins Cemetery and Wadleigh Park 

Inspector of Slaughtering and Animals 

Superintendent Recreation Fields 

Clerk Veterans' Agent 

Assistant Harbor Master 

Member, Board of Registrars 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 

Superintendent Moth Department 

Veterans' Agent 

Constable — Per Notice 

Intermittent Patrolman 

Election Officers 

Election Clerk 

Election Warden 

Casual Labor 

Director of Civil Defense 

Detective Duty Patrolman - Per Week 

Intermittent Fireman 

Superintendent Sewer Department — for year 1970 

Shellfish Constable 

Professional (Library) 

Pages (Library) 



2.82 

277.00 

500.00 

830.00 

100.00 

219.00 

487.00 

500.00 

830.00 

15.00 

3.33 

2.07 

2.31 

2.58 

2.55 

310.00 

8.47 

2.55 

1,065.00 

200.00 

3.81 

1.49 hr. to 1.92 per hr. 



24 



Custon (Library) 3.31 

Executive Treasurer (Library) 100.00 

Small Parks & Small Parcels of Town Land 1 ,438.00 



ALPHABETICAL LIST OF DEPARTMENTS 



Department 


Pay Group 


Schedule 


Board of Assessors 






Clerk Typist 


S3 


1 


Clerk 


S6 


1 


Board of Health 






Health Agent 


SIO 


1 


Superintendent Town Dump 


W5 


4 


Board of Selectmen 






Administrative Secretary 


S5 


1 


Cemetery Department 






Superintendent Woodside Cemetery 


Wl 


4 


Fire Department 






Fire Chief 


FS15 


3 


Deputy Chief 


FS12 


3 


Captain 


FSll 


3 


Private 


FS9 


3 


Harbor Department 






Harbor Master 


S8 


1 


Highway Department 






Working Foreman 


WIO 


4 


Heavy Equipment Operator 


W5 


4 


Laborer, Truck Driver 


W2 


4 


Laborer 


Wl 


4 


Police Department 






Police Chief 


PS15 


2 


Lieutenant 


PS12 


2 


Sergeant 


PSll 


2 


Patrolman 


PS9 


2 


Town Accountant 






Town Accountant 


S14 


1 


Clerk and Assistant Accountant 


S4 


1 


Clerk 


S3 


1 


Town Clerk 






Clerk 


S2 


1 


Town Commons ~ Caretaker 


Wl 


4 


Town Hall - Custodian 


SB 


1 



Hours 



20 

35 



48 
35 
40 



56 
56 
56 



40 
40 
40 
40 



40 
40 
40 



35 
20 

25 
48 
60 



25 



Treasurer 

Assistant Treasurer and Clerk 
Tree and Moth Department 

Working Foreman 

Skilled Laborer 
Water Department 

Superintendent Water Department 

Working Foreman Water Department 

Serviceman Water Department 

Pumping Station Operator & Analyst 

Utility Man 
Water and Sewerage Department 

Clerk and Office Assistant 

Plant Operator 
Wire Department 

Superintendent Wire Department 

Lineman Electrician — Licensed 
Library 

Chief Librarian 

Assistant Librarian 

Children's Librarian 

General Assistant — II 

General Assistant — I 

Clerk-Typist 

Professional 

Pages 

Custodian 

Executive Treasurer 



84 



35 



W6 


4 


40 


Wl 


4 


40 


S15 


1 




WIO 


4 


40 


W8 


4 


40 


W4 


4 


40 


W4 


4 


40 


S2 


1 


35 


A6 


1 


40 


FSll 


3 




SIO 


1 


40 


S14 


1 




S8 


1 


35 


S8 


1 


23 


S2 


1 


35 


SI 


1 


10 


S2 


1 


20 



Part Time Schedule 
Part Time Schedule 
Part Time Schedule 
Part Time Schedule 



Moved that the motion be amended to give all full time town employes a 
10 percent increase instead of 6.5. 

Voted by a voice vote in the negative. 

Voted by a voice vote in the affirmative to accept the main motion. 

ARTICLE 5. To hear and act upon the report and recommendations of the 
Personnel Committee with respect to salaries of the Town Elected Officials and 
to see if the Town will vote to accept said recommendations recommending and 
adopting, or amending and adopting the schedule heretofore accepted and 
adopted, or act on anything relating thereto. 



26 



SALARY SECHEULE ELECTED OFFICIALS 
(For Information Only - Not Subject to Compensation Plan) 

JOB TITLE 1970 

1970 ANNUAL RATES 

Tree Warden $2,604.00 

Town Clerk 2,345.00 

Clerk, Board of Registrars 255.00 

Highway Surveyor 8,605.00 

Moderator 150.00 

Town Collector 7,634.00 

Town Treasurer 8 144.00 
Board of Assessorrs 

Chairman 1,300.00 

Member 1,200.00 

Voted unanimously by a voice vote, that the report and recommendations 
of the Personnel Committee be and hereby is accepted and the following salary 
schedule for elected officials be and hereby is adopted, accepted and substituted 
for the schedule heretofore adopted. 

SAME AS PRINTED ABOVE. 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to fix the salaries and 
compensation of Elected Officers, and to see what sums the Town will vote to 
raise and appropriate from available funds, or otherwise, for the Payment of said 
salaries and compensation, payment of debt and interest, and for charges, 
expenses, compensation, equipment and outlays, capital and otherwise, of the 
several Town Departments, for the ensuing years, and retroactive to January 1 , 
1970, or act on anything relating thereto. 

Moved that this article be considered covered and acted upon in one vote, 
that the sum of $3,497,048.29 be and hereby is raised and appropriated, 
$36,537.00 for salaries of elected Town Officers that same being fixed as 
follows, in each case for the ensuing year effected and retroactive to January 1 , 
1970, and until the Annual Town Meeting in 1971, and that $3,460,51 1.29 for 
interest, maturing debt, charges, salaries, compensations, operations, 
maintenance, equipment outlays, capital and otherwise, and expenses of the 
various departments, effective and retroactive as aforesaid, being recommended 
in all the purpose itemized in subdivisions Numbers 1 through 49 inclusive: 

$150.00 

500.00 
105.00 

400.00 
555.00 



27 



1 


Moderator 




Advisory Committee 


lA 


Salaries 


IB 


Expenses 




Planning Board 


IC 


Clerical Assistance 


ID 


Expenses 



IE 


Personnel Committee - Expenses 


2,115.00 


IF 


Zoning Board of Appeals - Expenses 


350.00 


IG 


Conservation Committee - Expenses 


385.00 




Conservation Fund 


5,000.00 




School Facilities Committee - Expenses 


250.00 




Selectmen 




2 


Salaries and Wages 


9,448.33 


2A 


Expenses 


1,362.50 


2B 


Out of State Travel 
Town Accountant 


100.00 


3 


Salaries and Wages 


19,228.79 


3A 


Expenses 


1,287.00 


3B 


Out of State Travel 


150.00 


3C 


Capital Outlay 


486.00 


3D 


Rental of Office Equipment 
Town Treasurer 


772.00 


4 


Salaries and Wages 


14,437.78 


4A 


Expenses 


1,525.00 


4B 


Out of State Travel 


75.00 


4C 


Capital Outlay 
Town Collector 


385.00 


5 


Salaries and Wages 


9,749.01 


5A 


Expenses 
Assessors 


1,256.00 


6 


Salaries and Wages 


12,671.25 


6A 


Expenses 


24,322.00 


63 


Capital Outlay 
Law and Legal Counsel 


290.00 


8 


Salaries 


5,000.00 


8A 


Expenses 
Town Clerk 


36.00 


9 


Salaries 


6,027.61 


9A 


Expenses 
Elections & Registrations & Town Meetings 


1,135.50 


10 


Salaries & Wages 


4,366.50 


lOA 


Expenses 


5,121.00 


lOB 


Engineering - Expenses 
Town Hall 


300.00 


11 


Salary & Wages 


8,063.12 


llA 


Expenses 


5,081.00 


IIB 


Capital Outlay 
Police Department 


800.00 


12 


Salaries and Wages 


153,173.37 


12A 


Expenses 


13,805.00 


12B 


Capital Outlay 


5,700.00 


12C 


Out of State Travel 


150.00 



28 





Fire Department 




13 


Salaries and Wages 


188,586.40 


13A 


Expenses 


13,700.00 


13B 


Capital Outlay 


620.00 


13C 


Out of State Travel 
Police & Fire Headquarters Building 


150.00 


13D 


Expenses 


5,300.00 


13E 


Capital Outlay 




14 


Hydrant Services 
Wire Department 


24,816.00 


15 


Salaries and Wages 


18,475.62 


15A 


Expenses 


4,066.00 


15C 


Out of State Travel 
Sealing of Weights and Measures 


150.00 


16 


Salary 


487.00 


16A 


Expenses 
Insect Pest Control 


50.00 


17 


Salaries and Wages 


6,910.45 


17A 


Expenses 
Tree Department 


9,873.00 


18 


Salaries and Wages 


10,882.38 


18A 


Expenses 
Civil Defense 


2,685.00 


19 


Salaries 


460.50 


19A 


Expenses 
Shellfish Constable 


850.00 


19B 


Salaries and Wages 


* 


19C 


Expenses 
Board of Health 


110.00 


20 


Salary 


8,539.00 


20A 


Expenses 


4,100.00 


20B 


Out of State Travel 
Dental Clinics for School Children 


125.00 


21 


District Nurse & Other Nursing Services 
Inspection of Animals & Slaughtering 


6,000.00 


22 


Salary 


277.00 


22A 


Expenses 
Refuse & Garbage Disposal - Town Dump 


25.00 


23 


Salaries and Wages 


10,995.10 


23A 


Expenses 
Sewer Department 


6,060.00 


24 


Salaries and Wages 


10,233.63 


24A 


Expenses 


5,270.00 



29 



46C Interest 8,160.75 

46D Maturing Debt 35,000.00 

46E Employees Group Ins. & Retirement 4,900.00 

Moved that $20,000.00 be deleted from Schedule 6 A, Assessors so that 
the amount to be raised under this section is $4,322.00 instead of $24,322.00. 
Moved that this motion be withdrawn. 
Voted by a voice vote in the affirmative. 

Moved to divide Article 6, Section 6A and withhold $24,322.00 until 
Article 32 is disposed of. 

Seven citizens rose in favor of this motion and Moderator David Place 
ruled this motion in order and the Main Motion would be voted on excluding 
Section 6A, Assessors Expenses. 

ARTICLE 6. Voted by a voice vote, that this article be considered covered 
and acted upon in two votes, that the sum of $3,472,726.29 be and hereby is 
raised and appropriated, $36,537.00 for salaries of elected Town Officers that 
same being fixed as follows, in each case for the ensuing year effected and 
retroactive to January 1, 1970, and until the Annual Town Meeting in 1971 , and 
that $3,436,189.29 for interest, maturing debt, charges, salaries, compensation, 
operations, maintenance, equipment outlays, capital and otherwise, and 
expenses of the various departments, effective and retroactive as aforesaid, being 
recommended in all for the purpose itemized in subdivisions Numbers 1 through 
49 inclusive, except section 6A of Section 6, Assessors Expenses. 

Moved and voted by a hand vote, Yes, 421, to No, 49, to lay on the table 
the motion on Article 6, Section 6A, and take it up again as soon as Article 32 is 
disposed of. 

Moved and voted to advance Article 32 and vote on it at this time. 

Moved that the meeting be recessed for 10 minutes. 

Motion defeated by a voice vote. 

ARTICLE 32. To see if the Town will vote to direct the Board of 
Assessors to come forth at the next town meeting with a plan tore-evaluate the 
Town using a qualified firm, or take any other action relating thereto. 

Moved that this article be indefinitely postposed. 

Moved the previous question. 

The Moderator called for a hand vote as a two thirds vote is required. 

After further discussion on the article, the Moderator called for a vote on 
the motion to indefinitely postpone Article 32. The Moderator ruled that the 
voice vote was in favor. Seven citizens questioned the decision and a hand vote 
was ordered. The hand vote was yes, 243, to No, 179. The article is postponed 
indefinitely. 

The Moderator announced that the second motion on Article 6, Section 
6 A would be removed from the table and voted on at this time. 

32 



Voted by a voice vote, that the sum of $24,322.00 be raised and 
appropriated under Article 6, Section 6A, Assessors Expenses. 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town Treasurer 
with the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow money in anticipation of the 
revenue for the financial years beginning January 1, 1970 and January 1, 1971, 
in accordance with provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 4, and to 
renew any note or notes as may be given for a period of less than one year, in 
accordance with the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17, or take 
any other action relative thereto. 

Voted unanimously be a voice vote, that the Town Treasurer, with the 
approval of the Selectmen, be and hereby is authorized to borrow money from 
time to time in anticipation of the revenue for the financial years beginning 
January 1, 1970 and January 1 1971 in accordance with the provisions of 
General Laws, Chapter 44, Sec. 4 or as amended, and to renew any note or notes 
as may be given for a period of less than one year, in accordance with the 
provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44, Sec. 17 or as amended. 

ARTICLE 8. Voted unanimously be a voice vote, that the sum of $835.28 
be and hereby is appropriated from available cash in the Treasury being the 
unexpended balance of the Dog Fund received from the County for dog licenses, 
in accordance with Chapter 140, Section 172 of the General Laws, to be 
expended for the support of the public schools. 

ARTICLE 9. Voted unanimously by a voice vote, that there be and hereby 
is raised $23,947.27 by taxation and that there be and hereby is appropriated 
$6,052.73 from Reserve Fund - overlay surplus for the purpose of a Reserve 
Fund for the year 1970. 

Moved that Article 33 be advanced and taken up at this time. 

Voted by a voice vote in the affirmative. 

ARTICLE 33. Moved, that the sum of $2,840.00 be and hereby is raised 
and appropriated by taxation under the authority of Massachusetts General 
Laws (Term Ed.) Chapter 40, Section 5 (49) as amended for the purpose of 
coordinating or conducting programs dealing with problems of the aging and to 
promote facilities for the health, education, welfare and recreation of the aging. 
AMENDMENT TO ARTICLE 33. 

Moved that the motion on Article 33 be amended by substituting 
$1,000.00 in place of the figure $2,840.00 so that the motion shall read: That 
the sum of $1,000.00 be and hereby is raised and appropriated by taxation 
under the authority of Massachusetts General Laws (Ter. Ed.) Chapter 40, 
Section 5 (49) as amended for the purpose of coordinating or conducting 
programs dealing with problems of the aging and to promote facilities for the 
health, education, welfare and recreation of the aging. 

Voted by a voice vote in the affirmative. 

Moved that Article 15 be acted upon at this time. 

Voted by a voice vote in the affirmative. 

33 



ARTICLE 15. Voted by a voice vote, that the sum of $20,350.00 be and 
hereby is raised and appropriated by taxation for the use of the South Shore 
Regional School District for 1970 to pay Cohasset's share of assessment for the 
South Shore Regional School District. 

Moved and voted unanimously by a voice vote at 5:50 P.M. that this 
meeting be adjourned until 8:00 P.M. Monday, March 9, 1970 at the Joseph 
Osgood School. 

MONDAY, MARCH 9, 1970 

The Moderator opened the meeting at 8:10 P.M. The number of voters 
present as checked on the incoming voting hsts was 446. 

ARTICLE 10. Voted by a voice vote, that there be and hereby is raised 
and appropriated by taxation the sum of $1,450.00 for the purpose of 
maintaining during the ensuing year, the mosquito control works and 
improvement of low land and swamps as estimated and certified to by the State 
Reclamation Board in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 112, Acts of 
1931. 

ARTICLE 11. Voted by a voice vote, that the Town of Cohasset acting 
under the jurisdiction and provisions of Chapter 252 of the General Laws, as 
amended, join in the South Shore Mosquito Control Project in conjunction with 
the City of Quincy, and other towns joining therein, and that the sum of 
$4,700.00 be and hereby is raised and appropriated from taxation for the 
purpose of paying Cohasset's share thereof, the same to be paid to the 
Massachusetts Reclamation Board in the discretion of the Board of Selectmen if 
sufficient other municipaHties join to justify such action. 

ARTICLE 12. Voted by a voice vote, that the sum of $1,435.00 be and 
hereby is raised and appropriated from taxation to be used with balance of prior 
appropriation for the town's proportion of the cost for the control of insect, 
vegetable and animal life in Straits Pond for 1970 as advised by the State 
Reclamation Board and as provided by Chapter 557 of the Acts of 1955 as 
amended. 

ARTICLE 13. Voted by a voice vote, that the sum of $25,000.00 be and 
hereby is raised and appropriated by taxation for the Stabilization Fund to be 
added to sums previously appropriated therefore. 

Moved that Article 45 be the next article to be taken up for consideration. 
Voted by a voice vote in the affirmative. 

ARTICLE 45. (Inserted by the Zoning Study Committee, Robert B. 
James, Chairman and others, with concurrence of the Planning Board). 



34 



To see if the Town will vote to amend its existing Zoning By-Law as 
adopted by Special Town Meeting, December 2, 1969, by adding thereto a new 
subsection title "Garden Apartments by Special Permit Only". 

If adopted this amendment shall be designated as Subsection E of Section 
4 and present subsections E through G shall be renumbered F through H, or act 
on anything relating thereto. 

The proposed amendment is as follows: — 

E. GARDEN APARTMENTS BY SPECIAL PERMIT ONLY. 

1. DEFINITION: The term "Garden Apartments" as used in this section 
shall mean one or more buildings having a maximum height of two and one-half 
(IVi) stories or thirty-five (35) feet, whichever is greater, and containing not less 
than two (2) nor more than twelve (12) dwelling units in any one building. 

2. APPLICATION TO BOARD OF APPEALS. 

In any district the Board of Appeals may consider appHcations for the 
Construction and use of Garden Apartments and after a public hearing may issue 
a special permit therefor, provided that the premises in question is reasonably 
adaptable to such use and will allow proper layout thereof (including adequate 
separation of buildings and open areas from adjacent premises), and provided 
further that the use of the premisis (i) will not be injurious or dangerous to the 
public health, or hazardous because of traffic congestion, danger of fire, or other 
reasons (ii) will not have a material adverse effect on the value of land and 
buildings in the neighborhood and (iii) will not produce noise, virbration, smoke, 
dust, odors, heat or glare observable at the lot lines in amounts clearly 
detrimental to the normal use of adjacent property; (iv) will impose no excessive 
demand on water supply, (v) will create no detrimental sewerage disposal 
problem. 

3. ADDITIONAL CONDITIONS. 

In addition to the foregoing requirements, the construction and use of 
Garden Apartments shall be subject to the following conditions: 

(a) A minimun lot area requirement of one (1) acre in the Business 
Districts and Light Industry District of three (3) acres in Residence Districts A, 
B and C. 

(b) A total land area for each lot of land based on a minimum land area 
requirement of 3500 square feet for each apartment or family unit to be located 
on the lot. 

(c) In Business Districts and Light Industry District no portion of any 
enclosing wall of any building and no portion of any permissable structure or 
parking area shall be nearer to the street line of any existing way than fifty (50) 
feet, nor nearer the side lot line than thirty-five (35) feet. In Residence Districts 
A, B and C, each of these dimensions shall be fifty (50) feet. 

(d) No building in a group shall be closer to any other building on the lot 
than twenty-five (25) feet. 



35 



(e) The maximum coverage of the lot by all buildings and structures shall 
be thirty (30%) per cent of the total lot area. 

(0 A dwelling unit shall have at least a kitchen, bathroom, living room and 
bedroom. It shall have no more than two bedrooms. The rooms of a dwelling 
unit may be on one or two floors. 

(g) No space above the second story or below the first story of such 
building shall be used for dwelling purposes. 

(h) No building shall be farther than one hundred (100) feet from an 
access street or, in the alternative, from an access drive which may be a private 
drive on the Garden Apartment premises. 

(i) On each lot there shall be provided a permanent off-street parking area 
or areas, indoor and/or outdoor, of sufficient size to allow one and one-half (P/i) 
parking spaces for each apartment or family unit to be accommodated on the 
lot. 

(j) Parking and service areas, driveways and sidewalks shall be paved. 

4. SITE PLAN AND BUILDING PLAN' 

A site plan and a building plan shall be prepared to accompany each 
application for a special permit. The site plan shall show among other things the 
actual shape and dimension of the lot, all proposed buildings, structures, parking 
facihties, service areas, landscaping features, and such other information as may 
be necessary to determine that the requirements under this section are being 
met. 

The building plan shall show plans for each floor and elevations and shall 
further show the class of the construction, the principal architectural features 
and the material of which the exterior walls and roof are to be constructed. 

5. REFERENCE TO PLANNING BOARD 

Withing ten (10) days after receipt of the application for such permit the 
Board of Appeals shall transmit a copy thereof to the Planning Board which may 
in its descretion investigate the case and report in writing its recommendations 
to the Board of Appeals. The Board of Appeals shall not take final action on 
such application until it has received a report thereon from the Planning Board 
or until the Planning Board has allowed thirty (30) days to elapse from the 
receipt of such application without a submission of a report. 

6. INCONSISTENCY BETWEEN PROVISIONS. 

In the event of any inconsistency between the provisions of this subsection 
and other sections and subsections of this By— Law the provision of this 
subsection shall control. 

March 4, 1970 REPORT TO TOWN AFTER COHASSET 
PLANNING BOARD HEARING 
ON PROPOSED ZONING CHANGES 
At 8:00 P.M., on February 1 1 , 1970, after the publication of the required 
notice in the South Shore Mirror for two successive weekly editions, a hearing 
was held by the Cohasset Planning Board on changes in the Cohasset Zoning 
Code as amended at the December 1969 town meeting. Said changes were 
concerned with provisions for "garden apartments". Twenty-three people 
attended the hearing. In the absence of Charman Barrett, Mr. Bates presided. 

36 



The proposed amendment was presented and explained by Mr. Robert 
James, Chairman and Mr. Coulter and Mr. DeGiacomo of the Zoning Committee. 

The Committee is proposing an amendment which permits apartments to 
be build on a minimum of 3 acres in residential and 1 acre in business zones, 
after the Appeal Board is satisfied that there will be no detriment to the 
neighborhood. No specific zones have been established for apartments, where 
the building would be a right rather than on a permissive basis. 

While the Planning Board is not enthusiastic for apartments, it feels that 
this is a good amendment and recommends its acceptance. 

Moved that the Town accept this amendment to the Zoning By-Law. 

Amendment to Article 45. 

Moved that the figure 3500 square feet be deleted from the minimum land 
area required per unit in para. 3a per unit and the figure 5000 square feet be 
substituted. 

Moved the previous question 

Hand vote, yes, 347, to no, 76, motion carried. 

Hand vote on Main motion was defeated, yes 182, to 22,8 no. 

Amendment to Article 45. 

Moved that the Zoning By-Lay amendment submitted under Article 45 
and titled "Garden Apartments by Special Permits only" be further amended as 
follows. 

Paragraph 2. First line, after the words in any, insert the words "Business 
or Light Industry". 

Paragraph 3 (a) After the words "Light Industry District insert a period 
and delete the words "of three (3) acres in Residence Districts A, B and C". 

Paragraph 3 (c) Delete the last sentence "In residence District A, B and C, 
each of these dimensions shall be fifty (50) feet." 

Voted by a hand vote, yes 69, to no 287, motion defeated. 

Voted unanimously by a voice vote that this committee be discharged with 
a vote of thanks. 

RESOLUTION BY MARSOM PRATT. 

Resolved that it is the sense of this Town Meeting that the Moderator 
should appoint a committee to study the question of Garden Apartments for 
Cohasset, such Committee to report to the next Annual Town Meeting, or any 
Special Town Meeting which may be called for such purpose. 

Voted by a voice vote in the affirmative. 

Voted by a voice vote at 11: 00 P.M. that this meeting be adjourned until 
Tuesday, March 10, 1970 at 8:00 P.M. at Joseph Osgood School auditorium. 



37 



TUESDAY, MARCH 10, 1970 

The Moderator opened the meeting at 8:10 P.M. The number of voters 
present as checked on the incoming voting lists was 302. 

ARTICLE 14. Voted unanimously by a voice vote, that the Town assume 
liabiHty in the manner provided by Section 29 of Chapter 91 of the General 
Laws, as amended by Chapter 5, Acts of 1955, and as further amended for all 
damages that may be incurred by work to be performed by the Department of 
PubHc Works of Massachusetts for the improvement, development, maintenance 
and protection of tidal and non-tidal rivers and streams, harbors, tidewaters, 
foreshores and shores along a public beach, including the Merrimack and 
Connecticut rivers, in accordance with Section 11 of Chapter 91 of the General 
Laws, and authorize the Selectmen to execute and deliver a bond of indemnity 
therefor to the Commonwealth. 

ARTICLE 16. Voted unanimously by a voice vote, that the sum of 
$1,460.00 be and hereby is raised from available funds in the Treasury for 
library maintenance, this sum being received from the State Aid for Free PubHc 
Libraries in accordance with General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 53 and Chapter 
78, Section 19A. 

ARTICLE 17. Voted by a voice vote, that the sum of $1,500.00 be and 
hereby is raised and appropriated by taxation for reconstruction and resurfacing 
of existing sidewalks in need thereof. 

ARTICLE 18. Voted unanimously by a voice vote, that the sum of 
$6,000.00 be and hereby is appropriated for maintenance of highways under 
Chapter 90 of the General Laws and to meet said appropriation $2,000.00 be 
and hereby is raised and appropriated by taxation to meet said appropriation 
$2,000.00 be and hereby is raised and appropriated by taxation to meet the 
Town's share thereof; to meet the State and County share thereof that the 
Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, be and hereby is authorized to 
borrow $4,000.00 by temporary loan and to issue a note therefore in accordance 
with Section 6A Chapter 44 of the General Laws in anticipation of 
reimbursement from the State and County of their share thereof. 

ARTICLE 19. Voted by a voice vote, that the sum of $15,400.00 be and 
hereby is appropriated for Chapter 90 Highway Construction for Elm Street, and 
to meet said appropriation $3,850.00 hereby is raised and appropriated by 
taxation to meet the Town's share thereof; to meet the State and County share 
thereof that the Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, be and hereby is 
authorized to borrow $11, 550.00 by temporary loan and to issue a note therefor 
in accordance with Section 6A, Chapter 44 of the General Laws in anticipation 
of reimbursement from the State and County of their share thereof. 



38 



ARTICLE 20. Voted unanimously by a voice vote, that the Town accept 
Section 4 of Chapter 768 of the Acts of 1969 and that the sum of $7,681.76 be 
and hereby is appropriated from funds received or to be received from the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts in accordance with Chapter 768 of the Acts of 
1969, Section 4, for the reconstruction, resurfacing and installation of necessary 
drainage on highways. 

ARTICLE 21. Voted unanimously by a voice vote, that the sum of 
$4,000.00 be and hereby is appropriated and transferred from Sale of Cemetery 
Lots Fund-Woodside for the extension and improvement of Woodside 
Cemetery, including, but not restricted to, the cutting of trees, removal of 
stumps, laying out of lots, constructing paths and avenues, embelHshing and 
beautifying the grounds by grading, loaming and seeding and engineering services 
and contingencies in connection therewith. 

ARTICLE 22. Voted by a voice vote, that the sum of $3,050.00 be and 
hereby is raised by taxation for the purchase of one Speed-detecting equipment 
radar set; two two-way mobile radios and one recharge unit for said radios, said 
units to be for the use of the Cohasset Police Department, and that 
reimbursement from the Federal Government, when recieved, be credited to 
Surplus Revenue. 

ARTICLE 23. Moved that the Board of Selectmen be and hereby is 
authorized to raze and remove the vacant shack from Government Island and 
that the sum of $575.00 be and hereby is raised and appropriated by taxation to 
accompHsh same. 

Voice vote was in doubt. After further discussion the Moderator called for 
another vote. 

Voted by a voice vote in the negative. Motion defeated. 

ARTICLE 24. Voted unanimously by a voice vote, that the sum of 
$200.00 be and hereby is appropriated, this being the sum received from the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Department of Natural Resources for Shellfish 
Propogration, said sum to be applied to the Shellfish Constable Salary & Wage 
Budget. 

ARTICLE 25. Voted unanimously by a voice vote, that the Town accept 
Section 65 of Chapter 44 of the General Laws (Ter. Ed.) of the Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts which section relates to advances to Town Employees for 
vacation pay. 

ARTICLE 26. Voted by a voice vote, that the sum of $5,000.00 be and 
hereby is appropriated from available funds in the treasury for the furnishing, 
delivering and installation of four (4) school zone speed limit signals to be 
located at the Deer Hill School, Sohier Street and at the High School, Pond 
Street, and that the reimbursement, when received, be returned to Surplus 
Revenue. 



39 



ARTICLE 27. To see if the Town will raise and appropriate a sum of 
money for the purpose of reprinting the Narrative History of Cohasset, 1898 
Edition, F. Victor Bigelow, or act on anything relating thereto. 

Voted unanimously by a voice vote, that no action be taken under this 
article. 

ARTICLE 28. Voted by a voice vote, that the Town accept Section 20C of 
Chapter 90 of the General Laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts which 
provides along with procedures for handling parking violations, that the Board of 
Selectmen shall, from time to time, establish by rule or regulation a schedule of 
fines for parking violations committee within the Town of Cohasset. 

ARTICLE 29. Moved that the Town vote: 

1. To establish a Board of Tree and Park Commissioners, the members of 
which shall be members of the then Board of Selectmen, the duties of which 
shall be as follows: 

Beginning in March of the year 1971 it shall after consultation with the 
Conservation Commission appoint for a term of up to three years a 
superintendent of Trees and Parks and who shall, under said Board's direction, 
perform the duties of the Tree Warden, Caretaker of the Town Commons, Parks 
and Lands, and upon the appropriate authorization of the General Court of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts there shall be added to said duties the duties 
and responsibiHties of the Superintendent of Insect Pest Control. The 
Superintendent of Trees and Parks shall receive such salary as shall be established 
by the Cohasset Personnel Committee. 

2. To abolish the elective office of Tree Warden upon the expiration of the 
present term for Tree Warden. 

3. To abolish the appointive position of Superintendent of Insect Pest 
Control upon the enactment of the appropriate enabling legislation. 

4. To instruct the Board of Selectmen to petition the General Court of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts for the passage of a special law authorizing the 
elimination of the position of Superintendent of Insect Pest Control by 
transferring his functions and duties to the Superintendent of Trees and Parks 
with the provision no person shall be appointed to a second term as 
Superintendent of Trees and Parks unless such person is the holder of a valid 
supervisory license, issued under the rules and regulations of the Pesticide Board 
of the Massachusetts Department of Public Health., 

Voted by a voice vote in the affirmative. 

Seven citizens questioned the Moderators decision and a hand vote was 
ordered. 

Hand vote was Yes, 181, to No, 92 to uphold the Moderators decision. 

ARTICLE 30. Voted by a voice vote, that the Town approve a petition for 
the enactment by the General Court of a special law authorizing the Cohasset 
Town Treasurer to be the Treasurer of the Cohasset Free Public Library and 



40 



f-Vf T^vfv.-Tf^^s-'-''*^^ 



•ft be T-Me I n!*^».'^v'i 



further authorizing, at the request of the Directors of the Paul Pratt Memorial 
Library 'and further authorizing the Town Treasurer to accept and administer 
funds which shall be transferred to him by the Treasurer of the Cohasset Free 
Public Library and the Treasurer of the Paul Pratt Memorial Library, and further 
authorize the Treasurer to pay proper charges for the establishment, 
maintenance or increase of a library to which the inhabitants have free access 
and of which they have the use, which maintenance shall include but not be 
restricted to payment of insurance premiums and capital expenditures and for 
establishing and maintaining a pubhc reading room in connection with and under 
the control of the managers of such library. 

ARTICLE 3L Voted unanimously by a voice vote, that the Selectmen be 
and hereby are authorized to investigate the possibility of purchasing the land 
situated in Cohasset owned by the Perm Central Co., formerly owned by the 
New York, New Haven and Hartford Railroad. 

ARTICLE 35. Voted unanimously by a voice vote, that the Town assume 
the obligation to pay medical expenses incurred as a result of injuries sustained 
by the PoHce and Fire Department personnel suffered while in the line of duty, 
payments to be authorized and administered by the Board of Selectmen and 
with the further provision that said medical expense payments shall not exceed 
those which would be paid under the Blue Cross and Blue Shield coverage for an 
individual Town employee as set forth in the Blue Cross and Blue Shield group 
insurance poKcy carried by the Town. 

ARTICLE 36. Voted by a voice vote, that the Town accept Chapter 872 
of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts Acts of 1969 which is an act relative to 
compensation for overtime service by regular poHce officers of cities and towns 
and members of the Police force of the MetropoHtan District Commission, and 
that the sum of $3,000.00 be and hereby is raised and appropriated by taxation 
therefore, which sum shall be added to Salaries and Wages Account of the PoHce 
Department. 

ARTICLE 38. Voted by a voice vote, that the Town amend the Town of 
Cohasset, Massachusetts Personnel Classification & Compensation Plan By-Law 
by adding at the end of the classification of Police Department the following 
paragraph: 

Members of the Pohce Department who work the 4:00 P.M. to midnight 
or midnight to 8:00 A.M. shifts shall be granted a shift premium of five per cent 
of their regular rate of pay; said amendment to be effective as of January 1, 
1970. 

And that the sum of $4,000.00 be and hereby is raised and appropriated 
by taxation therefore, which sum shall be added to the Salaries & Wage Account 
of the Police Department. 

ARTICLE 39. Voted by a hand vote Yes, 243, to No, 3, that the sum of 



41 



$74,000.00 be and hereby is appropriated to be expended by the Board of Water 
Commissioners for engaging engineers and others to prepare plans and 
specifications to construct a reservoir, control structure and treatment plant as 
outlined in a "Report on Surface Water Augmentation" prepared by Sanitary 
Engineering Associates, Inc. of Boston; to meet said appropriation that 
$10,000.00 be and hereby is raised and appropriated from surplus Water 
Department revenue and that the Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen 
be and hereby is authorized to borrow the sum of $64,000.00 in accordance 
with General Laws Chapter 44, Section 7, clause 22 and to issue a note or notes 
therefore. 

ARTICLE 40. Moved that the sum of $22,483.04 be and hereby is raised 
and appropriated by taxation for payment of a subsidiary or additional rate in 
addition to the payment of fifty per cent of a premium for contributory group 
life and health insurance for employees in the service of the Town and their 
dependents in the event that the Town shall vote in the Annual Election to pay 
such subsidiary or additional rate. In the event the Town does not vote to pay 
the subsidiary or additional rate, then any funds appropriated hereunder will be 
added to the Surplus Reserve Fund. 

Motion defeated by a voice vote. 

Voted unanimously by a voice vote, that this meeting be adjourned at 
11:45 P.M. until March 11, 1970, at 8:00 P.M. at the Joseph Osgood School 
Auditorium. 



WEDNESDAY, MARCH 11, 1970 

The Moderator opened the meeting at 8:25 P.M. The number of voters 
present as checked on the incoming voting lists was 257. 

ARTICLE 41 was still before the voters for a vote. After further discussion 
the following vote was passed. 

Voted by a voice vote, that the School Facilities Committee, estabHshed 
under Article 42 of the Annual Town Meeting held March 5, 1960 be and hereby 
is authorized to build a pathway from the intersection of Reservoir Road and 
Pleasant Street to the intersection of Reservoir Road and Pleasant Street to the 
site of Deer Hill School, and that the sum of $3,000.00 be and hereby is raised 
and appropriated by taxation therefore. 

ARTICLE 42. Voted unanimously by a voice vote, that this article be 
indefinitely postponed. 

ARTICLE 43. la & 11. Voted by a hand vote Yes, 241, to No, 3, that 
$380,550.00 is appropriated for constructing sewers, sewerage systems and 
sewage treatment and disposal facilities; that to raise this appropriation the 



42 



Treasurer with the approval of the Selectmen is authorized to borrow 
$380,550.00 under Chapter 65 of the Acts of 1962, as amended; and that the 
Board of Sewer Commissioners with the approval of the Selectmen is authorized 
to contract for and expend State and Federal grants for the project, provided 
that the total authorized borrowing shall be reduced by the amount of any state 
or federal construction aid. 

ARTICLE 43. lb. Voted that the town shall not pay the whole cost of the 
system or systems of sewerage and sewage disposal and that the portion to be 
paid by the town shall be determined by assessments to be fixed by the Sewer 
Commissioners. 

ARTICLE 43. Ic. Voted unanimously by a voice vote, that assessments 
shall be made upon abutters and upon owners of land or upon those who by 
more remote means receive benefit from said system of sewerage, drainage 
and/or sewage disposal by a fixed uniform rate by any and all methods 
permitted by the General Laws including provisions of Chapter 65 of the Acts of 
1962, as amended and Chapter 80 and Chapter 83 of the General Laws and 
otherwise and that the sewer commissioners be and hereby are authorized to fix 
the uniform rate. 

ARTICLE 43 Id. Voted unanimously by a voice vote that a just and 
equitable annual charge for the use of common sewers, based upon the benefits 
derived therefrom, be established by the sewer commissioners. 

ARTICLE 44. To see if the Town will vote to raise and/or appropriate a 
sum of money for the construction and operation of all or any part of a system 
or systems of sewage and sewage disposal as provided in Chapter 65 of the Acts 
of 1962 as amended, including the right to use said money for the settlement of 
any takings by right of eminent domain, and to determine how said money shall 
be raised, whether by transfer from available funds, taxation, by borrowing or 
otherwise, said amount raised or appropriated hereunder is to supplement the 
appropriations provided under Article 24 voted at the Annual Town Meeting 
held on March 4, 1967 and at the Special Town Meeting held on June 4, 1968, 
or act on anything relating thereto. 

Voted unanimously by a voice vote, that the article be indefinitely 
postponed. 

ARTICLE 46. Voted unanimously by a voice vote, that the sum of 
$133.65 be and hereby is raised and appropriated by taxation to pay the 
following unpaid bill for 1969: 

Hingham Water Co. - $133.65 for hydrant service. 

ARTICLE 47. (Inserted by the Board of Selectmen at the request of the 
Building Code Committee, Charles T. Patrolia, Chairman and others) To see if 
the Town will vote to amend the Town By— Laws by inserting an article 

43 



numbered 23 which shall read as follows: 

BUILDING CODE 
OF THE TOWN OF COHASSET, MASSACHUSETTS 

SECTION 100 
GENERAL PROVISIONS 

100.1 This By-Law shall be know as the Building Code of the Town of 
Cohasset. Its intent is to provide for the safety, health and welfare of the 
inhabitants of the Town and the protection of their property from fire and 
accident insofar as these hazards are dependent upon building construction. 
Except as noted in Section 100.4 below, no structure, building, or part thereof 
shall hereafter be built, constructed, razed, moved, altered, added to, or changed 
in type of use or occupancy unless it conforms to the provisions of this code, or 
unless a valid building permit is presently outstanding. 

100.2 The laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts affecting buildings 
or structures, excluding permissive legislation relating thereto not accepted by 
the Town of Cohasset, shall be as fully complied with as though herein written. 

100.3 No provision of the Zoning By-Law shall be nullified by this code. 

100.4 The following shall be excepted from the provisions of this code: 

(a) Buildings belonging to the United States of America or to the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 

(b) Public bridges, quays and wharves. 

(c) Buildings not over 8 feet in length, width or height which are not to be 
used for human occupancy. 

(d) Temporary structures to be used for storage or offices during 
construction operations, provided such structures are removed at the completion 
of such operations. 

SECTION 101 

BUILDING DEPARTMENT 

101.1 A Building Department under the administration of a Building 
Inspector responsible to the Selectmen is hereby established. 

101.2 The Selectmen shall appoint a Building Inspector who shall also 
serve as Zoning Officer, and who shall be qualified by training and experience in 
the supervision of building operations. He shall have had at least 10 years 
experience in responsible charge of building construction and shall be a 
registered professional engineer, a registered architect, or a qualified builder. He 
may be appointed either for part time or full time duty and his hours of work 
and term of office shall be at the discretion of the Selectmen. His compensation 
shall be fixed by the Selectmen and the Personnel Board. During temporary 
absence or illness of the Building Inspector the Selectmen may appoint and 
authorize payment to a substitute who shall serve until the return of the 
Building Inspector. Clerical or technical assistants to the Building Inspector may 



44 



be authorized by the Selectmen at their discretion. 

101.3 The Building Inspector shall be provided by the Selectmen with 
office or desk space and with the necessary furniture, equipment and supplies to 
carry out his work. 

101.4 A budget for the operation of the Building Department shall be 
drawn up by the Building Inspector and approved by the Selectmen and the 
Advisory Committee. 

101.5 The Building Inspector shall administer the Building Department 
and enforce the provisions of this code, He shall require conformity with the 
regulations of the Zoning By-Law, the Planning Board, the Board of Health, the 
Plumbing Inspector, the Superintendent of Wires, the Fire Chief, and any other 
boards or officials of the Town of Cohasset or the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts having jurisdiction over building operations. He shall inform the 
above mentioned officials, boards and departments of any matters within their 
jurisdiction. He shall establish appropriate rules or procedure, keep records of 
the business of the department, make all returns required by law, render an 
annual report to the Selectmen and such other reports as they may request. He 
shall issue all building permits and examine buildings or structures for which 
they have been issued. He shall require that materials and workmanship shall be 
of good quality and that types and methods of construction shall be in 
accordance with generally accepted standards of engineering practice and not 
inconsistent with law. He shall order the suspension of any work being done in 
violation of any provision of this code. He shall examine all buildings or 
structures reported to be insecure, dangerous, or damaged from any cause, and if 
he believes a building or structure to be unsafe he shall notify the owner or 
occupant to make it safe or vacate it. Where necessary to protect the occupants 
or the public he may order that an unsafe building or structure by removed or 
demolished. 

101.6 In the performance of his duties, the Building Inspector shall have 
the right to enter property or buildings at any reasonable hour and upon proper 
identification. He shall not be personally liable while acting for the Town, and 
he is hereby relieved from personal liability for any damage that may accrue to 
persons or property as a result of any act required or permitted in the discharge 
of his official duties. 

SECTION 102 
PERMITS 

102.1 Except as provided under Section 102.2 below, a property owner or 
his agent shall file an application for a Permit with the Building Department 
before erecting, altering, moving, razing, adding to, or changing the use or type 
of occupancy of any building, swimming pool, or structure not specifically 
excluded under Section 100.4. No work shall be started until a permit is granted. 
The Building Inspector may, if he finds it proper to do so, issue a permit for a 
part of the work while the application is being examined. 

102.2 Ordinary repairs or minor alterations to buildings or structures may 



45 



be made without a Permit providing the work does not include changes in 
structural supports, stairways, required exits, plumbing systems, electric systems, 
necessary light and ventilation, or anything that might affect the health and 
safety of the occupants or the public. A small accessory sign permitted under the 
Zoning By-Law as of right in Residence districts may be erected without a 
permit. Any work erected without a permit shall conform in all other respects 
with the provisions of this code. Any doubt or uncertainty regarding the 
application of any part or provision of this section shall be referred to the 
Building Inspector for his decision and it shall be the legal responsibility of both 
the owner of the property and the person or company performing the work to 
insure that this is done. 

102.3 Two copies of a plot plan drawn tq scale shall be filed with each 
application for a permit. The plot plan shall show lot area, boundaries and 
dimensions, the size and location of the proposed building(s) or structure(s) and 
of any existing building(s) or structure(s) on the lot. When, in the opinion of the 
Building Inspector, an application for a Permit does not adequately describe the 
proposed work, there shall be filed 2 copies of sufficient plans and specifications 
and other data as may be directed. When a Permit is issued, 1 copy of the plans 
and specifications stamped with the Building Inspector's approval will be 
returned to the owner or builder and these shall be kept at the work and made 
available for reference. 

102.4 Except as provided below in this Section, plans and specifications 
filed with an application for a Permit shall have been prepared by and shall be 
stamped with the seal of an architect or professional engineer registered by the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts. This requirement shall not apply to plans and 
specifications for any building or structure exempted under Chapter 11 2 of the 
General Laws as amended, including the following: 

(a) Any single or 2 family residence or accessory building. 

(b) A private swimming pool. 

(c) Any building used for farm purposed. 

(d) Any building containing less than 35000 cubic feet of space. 

102.5 The Building Inspector shall require changes in plans or 
specifications necessary to bring them into conformity with this code or with 
any other laws, ordinances, or regulations which are appHcable. He may order 
such changes either before or after a permit is granted and, during the course of 
construction, he shall require variations from the plans or specifications if 
necessary to satisfy the law or to insure the safety of persons or property. 

102.6 Permits shall be issued within 15 days after receipt of application 
providing the requirements of this code have been complied with. If 
requirements have not been complied with the Permit shall be denied or 
withheld until compliance has been established. Permits shall be denied or 
withheld until compliance has been estabHshed. Permits shall become void if 
operations thereunder have not commenced within six months or, having 
commenced, have been discontinued for six months or longer. In either case a 
new Permit or a renewal of the old one must be obtained before work is started 
or continued. Permits and applications for them shall be on forms issued by the 



46 



Building Department. 

102.7 Applications for Permits shall be accompanied by fees payable to 
the Town of Cohasset as follows: $2.00 for each $1,000.00 or fraction thereof 
of the reasonably estimated cost of the work contemplated, excepting that the 
maximum and minimum fees for each indicidual building or structure shall be 
$2,000.00 and $5.00 respectively. Reasonably estimated costs shall be subject to 
the agreement of the Building Inspector. The above fees are exclusive of any 
supplementary fees required by other Municipal Departments in connection with 
their required permits or inspections. 

SECTION 103 

USE AND OCCUPANCY 

103.1 A Permit to erect or alter any building or structure shall be deemed 
a permit to occupy or use such building or structure when it is completed in 
accordance with this code. The permitted use or occupancy shall be restricted to 
the purposes specified in the permit, or to other appropriate uses permitted 
under the Zoning By-Law for the Zoning District concerned providing such 
other uses do not endanger the health or safety of the occupants or the public, 
and do not conflict with any of the provisions of this code. 

SECTION 104 
VIOLATIONS 

104.1 It shall be unlawful for any person or corporation to erect, use, 
occupy or maintain any building or structure in violation of any provision of this 
code, or to cause, permit or suffer any violation to be committed. 

104.2 Whoever willfully violates any of the provisions of this code shall be 
liable to a fine for each offense of not less than $10.00 or more than $50.00 as 
the court may direct. 

104.3 Violations shall be corrected in the manner and within such time 
limits as may be directed by the Building Inspector. 

SECTION 105 

BUILDING BOARD OF APPEAL 

105.1 A building Board of Appeal is hereby estabHshed and shall consist of 
three voters of the Town who are quahfied by experience and training to pass 
upon matters pertaining to building construction and one of whom shall be an 
attorney-at-law. Members of the Building Board of Appeal shall be appointed by 
the Selectmen. In the beginning, one member shall be appointed for 1 year, one 
member for 2 years and one member for 3 years. Thereafter, appointments shall 
be for 3 years except that if a member is unable to complete his term a 
substitute shall be appointed for the unexpired balance of that term. No member 
shall act in any case in which he may have a personal or financial interest. In that 
case, a temporary substitute shall be appointed by the Selectmen. 



47 



105.2 The Building Board of Appeal shall establish rules andregulationsfor 
its own procedure not inconsistent with the provision of this Code and in 
conformity with the powers provided in the General Laws of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 

105.3 Any person aggrieved by act or decision of the Building Inspector 
with respect to any matter within the primary concern of this Building Code 
may appeal therefrom within 10 days of filing with the Building Inspector an 
application for a hearing before the Building Board of Appeal. Within 3 days of 
receipt of the Application, the Building Inspector in consultation with the Board 
shall set a time and place for the hearing, and notify all interested parties. 

105.4 After a public hearing, the Building Board of Appeal may alter or 
reverse the ruling of the Building Inspector, or vary the application of any 
provision of tliis Code to any particular case when, in its opinion, the 
enforcement thereof would do manifest injustice, or would be contrary to the 
spirit and purpose of this Code or to the public interest. 

105.5 The Building Board of Appeal shall reach a decision in every case 
without unreasonable or unnecessary delay. Every decision shall be in writing 
and shall specify the reasons for the decision and the final vote on it by the 
members. A signed copy shall be sent at once to the appellant and to the 
Building Inspector and the Town Clerk. 

105.6 If the original order or ruling of the Building Inspector shall be 
affirmed by the Building Board of Appeal it shall have full force and effect, if 
modified or anulled, the Building Inspector shall issue directions or take action 
in accordance with the decision of the Board. 

105.7 Any person aggrieved by a decision of the Building Board of Appeal 
whether previously a party to the proceeding or not, or any officer or Board of 
the Town of Cohasset, may appeal to the Superior Court, providing such appeal 
is filed within 20 days after the decision by the Building Board of Appeal has 
been filed in the offices of the Town Clerk. 

SECTION 200 
DEFINITIONS 

ADDITION, as applied to a building or structure, means any construction 
which increases the area or the height of any portion of the building or 
structure. 

ALTERATION, as applied to a building or structure, means any change or 
modification in construction, exit facilities, or permanent fixtures or equipment. 

APARTMENT - See "Dwelling unit." 

AREA means the maximum horizontal projected area of the building or 
structure. 

APPROVED, as applied to a material, device or mode of construction, 
means approved by the Building Inspector in accordance with the provisions of 
this code, or by other authority designated by law to give approval in the matter 
in question. 

ATTIC means the space between the ceiling beams of the top habitable 



48 



story and the roof rafters. 

BASEMENT means a story of a building or structure having one-half or 
more of its clear height below grade. Also see "Story." 

BUILDING means a structure intended for or adapted to the shelter, 
support, or enclosure of persons, animals, or property. The term "building" shall 
be construed as if followed by the words "or portion thereof." For the purposes 
of this code each portion of a building separated from other portions by a fire 
wall shall be considered as a separate building. 

CAR PORT means a partially enclosed building or structure used or 
intended for use for the same purposes as a Garage. 

CELLAR — See Basement. 

CONCRETE means a mixture of portland cement, aggregates and water, 
reinforced concrete means concrete in which reinforcement other than that 
provided for shrinkage or temperature change is embedded in such a manner that 
the two materials act together in resisting forces. 

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY means that depearment of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 

DWELLING UNIT means one or more rooms arranged for the use of one 
or more persons as a single housekeeping unit with cooking, living, sleeping, and 
sanitary facilities. 

EXIT DOORWAY means a doorway opening: directly to the exterior; to a 
horizontal exit; to an exit stairway; or to a similar place of safety. 

FIRE DOOR means a door and its assembly, so constructed and assembled 
in place as to give protection against the passage of fire. 

FIRE WALL - see under Walls. 

FIRESTOP means a solid tight closure placed so as to restrict the spread of 
fire and smoke in concealed spaces. 

FOOTING means that part of a foundation resting directly on the ground. 

GARAGE means an enclosed building or structure or portion thereof, in 
which a motor vehicle containing a flammable fluid or gas in its fuel storage tank 
is stored, housed, kept, repaired or serviced. 

HABITABLE SPACE means a room or enclosed floor space intended for 
human occupancy. 

MASONRY means a built-up construction or combination of building 
units of such materials as clay, shale, concrete, glass, gypsum or stone set in 
mortar. 

(a) Hollow masonry units means a masonry unit whose net cross-sectional 
area in any plane parallel to the bearing surface is less than 75 per cent of its 
gross cross-sectional area measured in the same plane. 

(b) Reinforced masonry means unit masonry in which reinforcement is 
imbedded in such a manner that the two materials act together in resisting 
forces. 

(c) Solid masonry means masonry consisting of soHd masonry units laid 
contiguously in mortar. 

OCCUPIED, as applied to a building, shall be construed as though 
followed by the words "or intended, arranged or designed to be occupied." 

49 



PARTY WALL means a wall used or built to be used in common by two 
or more buildings. 

REPAIR means the replacement of existing work with equivalent materials 
for the purpose of its maintenance; but not including any addition, change or 
modification in construction, exit facilities, or permanent fixtures or equipment. 

SPAN of a structural member means the distance between supports 
measured horizontally. 

STORY means the space in a building between a floor and the floor or 
roof next above. 

HALF STORY means usable space within the general contours of a sloping 
roof, or a usable pent house above a flat roof. 

STRUCTURE means anything constructed or erected which requires 
location on or in the ground, or is attached to something having location on or 
in the ground, including among other: buildings, stadiums, reviewing stands, 
platforms, stagings, observation towers, broadcasting towers, water or gas tanks 
or towers, tressels, private bridges, private piers and wharves, sheds, bins, 
shelters, fences, billboards, signs, and swimming pools. 

WALLS; 

(a) Bearing Wall means any wall which supports a vertical load in addition 
to its own weight. 

(b) Fire Wall means resistive wall which sub-divides a building or a space so 
as to restrict the spread of fire and in which openings are protected by fire 
doors. 

(c) Foundation Wall means a wall below the floor nearest grade, serving as 
a support for a wall, pier, column, beam, floor, or other structual element. 

(d) Non-Bearing Wall means a wall that supports no load other than its 
own weight. 

(e) Retaining Wall means a wall which primarily supports horizontal 
forces. 

(f) Veneered Wall means a wall having a facing material securely attached 
to a structural backing but not bonded to the backing so as to exert a common 
reaction under load. 

SECTION 300 

CONSTRUCTION CLASSIFICATIONS 

For the purposes of this code the construction of buildings and structures shall 
be classified as listed below: 

300. 1 Class 1 , Fire Resistive Construction — Buildings and/or portions of 
buildings within this classification shall be constructed with enclosure walls of 
masonry, concrete, or other approved incombustible materials with a fire 
resistive rating of not less than 2 hours, with Class A or Class B roof covering, 
and with floors, roofs, interior walls, partitions, exitways, and structural 
elements built and protected with incombustible materials all of which shall have 
a fire resistive rating of not less than % hours, excepting that doors (exclusive of 
fire doors), windows, trim, decorative features, and miscellaneous items of 



50 



millwork and cabinet work may be of wood, or other materials approved by the 
building inspector in cases not contrary to Massachusetts Law or to Section 
300.6 below. 

300.2 Class 2, Incombustible Construction — Buildings and/or portions of 
buildings within this classification shall be constructed entirely of steel, 
concrete, or other approved incombustible materials without specified fire 
resistive rating except that exitways shall have a fire resistive rating of not less 
than Ya hour and roof coverings shall be Class A or Class B. 

300.3 Class 3, Masonry Wall Construction — Buildings and/or portions of 
buildings within this classification shall be constructed with enclosure walls of 
masonry or other approved incombustible materials with a fire resistive rating or 
not less than 2 hours, with Class C or better roof covering, and with roofs, 
floors, partitions, and the framing for these built wholly or partly of wood or 
other approved materials. 

300.4 Class 4, Frame Construction — Buildings and/or portions of 
buildings within this classification shall be constructed with walls, partitions, 
floors and the framing for these wholly or partly of wood or other approved 
materials. 

300.5 Fire resistive ratings for building materials shall conform to the 
standards established by the Department of Public Safety of the Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts and pubHshed in the current edition of the Board of Standards 
Building Code. Fire resistive classifications for roof coverings shall conform 
generally to the standards recommended by the American Insurance Association 
and published in the current edition of the National Building Code. In addition, 
wood shingles 16 inches or longer will be accepted as Class C coverings where 
laid with exposure of 4 inches or less on roof pitches of 3 in 12 to 6 in 12, or 
with exposures of 5 inches or less on roof pitches of more than 6 in 12. 

300.6 Openings in enclosures separating different construction 
classifications or different occupancy classifications, shall be protected with 
doors or windows having a fire resistive rating of not less than ^/4 hour. 

SECTION 400 

OCCUPANCY CLASSIFICATIONS 

400.1 For the purpose of this code occupancies of buildings or portions 
thereof are classified as follows: Assembly, Business, Educational, High Hazard, 
Industrial, Institutional, Mercantile, Residenntial, Storage, and Farm use. 

400.2 Definitions of these classes of occupancy and of the various uses 
comprehended under each class shall be as published in the current edition of 
the National Building Code, published by the American Insurance Association. 

400.3 Any Classification problem, any use not specifically provided for, or 
any uncertainty as to a classification shall be refered to the Building Inspector 
for decision and resolution. 



51 



SECTION 500 

GENERAL RESTRICTIONS 

Buildings or structures or parts thereof hereafter built or altered shall 
conform as noted below to the construction classification described in Section 
300. 

500.1 Class 1, Fire resistive Construction shall be used for the following 
Occupancy Classifications: Assembly (except churches) if for more than 100 
persons or if located above the first floor, Educational (except libraries) or 
Institutional, if over one story high exclusive of basement; Residential, if other 
than a one or two family house with customary accessory uses, and if more than 
two and one half stories high exclusive of basement, or if containing more than 
twelve dwelling units, or more than twenty hotel, motel, club or lodging house 
sleeping rooms, or dormitory rooms for more than twenty-five persons. 

500.2 Class 2, Incombustible Construction (or Clas 1 optionally) shall be 
used for the following Occupancy Classifications: High Hazard; Industrial, 
Mercantile, or Storage, if over 4000 square feet in area. 

500.3 Class 3, Masonry Wall Construction (or Class 1 or Class 2 optionally) 
shall be used for the following Occupancy Classifications: Assembly (other than 
churches) if for not more than 100 persons and not located above the first flor. 
Educational (other than libraries) or Institutional, if not over one story high 
exclusive of basement; Churches and libraries if over 5000 square feet in area or 
if over one story high exclusive of basement; Industrial, Mercantile or Storage, if 
not over 4000 square feet in area; Business if over two stories high exclusive of 
basement, or if over 4000 square feet in area. 

500.4 Class 4, Frame Construction (or Class 1, Class 2, or Class 3 
optionally) may be used for the following Occupancy Classifications: Business, if 
not over two stories high exclusive of basement and not over 4000 square feet in 
area; Churches and Libraries if not over 5000 square feet in area and not over 
one story high exclusive of basement; one and two Family Residences with 
customary accessory buildings and uses; other Residential buildings if not over 
two and one half stories high exclusive of basement and containing not over 
twelve dwelling units, or not over twenty hotel, motel, club, or lodging house 
sleeping rooms, or dormitory rooms for not more than twenty-five persons; 
Farm buildings. 

500.5 Current regulations for the construction of buildings established by 
the Department of Pubhc Safety of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts are 
supplementary to the restrictions noted herein and shall govern wherever 
applicable. 

500.6 Swimming Pools shall be constructed in accordance with accepted 
standards as approved by the Building Inspector. They shall be enclosed with a 
fence or barrier, or otherwise as may be directed. 

SECTION 600 

FIRE SAFETY & PREVENTION 



52 



600.1 All buildings hereafter erected shall be made reasonably fire safe in 
accordance with acceptable building standards. 

600.2 Except as noted below, buildings located within ten feet of any 
other building, or within five feet of a property line other than a street boundary 
line, shall have any wall so exposed built of fire resistive construction and 
openings shall be suitably protected. In buildings where frame construction is 
otherwise permitted, any wall exposed as described above may have a 
non-fireproof weather surface backed by a fire resistive wall. The above 
requirements do not apply to adjacent walls of Residential occupancies and their 
customary accessory buildings where Class 4 construction is permitted under 
Section 500.4 and where all the buildings are located on the same lot, but do 
apply to any walls of such buildings that are within five feet of a property line 
other than a street boundary line. 

6G0.3 Walls, partitions, furring, and spaces between joists resting on walls 
or partitioiis shall be fire-stopped with incombustible material designed to form 
effective barriers against the spread of fire between stories and sub-divisions of 
every building. Stair stringers if enclosed shall be fire stopped at least once in the 
middle portion of each run. Fircstops shall be placed at fioors around all 
chimneys. In buildings of Class 3 and Class 4 Construction fire-stopping may be 
of wood not less than two inches in nominal thickness. 

600.4 Fire-stopping shall not be covered or concealed until approved by 
the Building Inspector. 

600.5 Party walls shall be of masonry, concrete, or other approved fire 
resistive material and openings in such walls shall be protected with approved 
self-closing fire doors. 

600.6 Fire walls separating occupancies of area divisions shall be of 
masonry or concrete from the basement fioor to the first floor. From first floor 
to roof, fire walls may be masonry, concrete, wood studs filled with SVi inches 
or more of masonry, or other approved construction, depending on construction 
and occupancy restrictions set forth under Section 500. 

600.7 Except as noted below, ceilings in all buildings shall have a fire 
resistive rating of at least Ya hour. This requirement shall not apply to Farm 
buildings or to Residential occupancies with customary accessory buildings and 
uses whe/e Class 4 construction is permitted under Section 500.4, excepting in 
the specific cases set forth under Sections 600.12, 600.15, 600.17 and 600.18. 

600.8 In buildings of mixed occupancy where any portions are to be used 
for Residential or institutional purposes, walls and ceilings surrounding 
stairways, and floors, walls, and ceilings separating Residential or Institutional 
uses from other uses shall have a fire resistive rating of at least % hour. 

600.9 Basements in all buildings except one and two family houses and 
Farm Buildings shall be provided with suitable means of egress directly to the 
outside in addition to any interior access stairs. All crawl spaces shall have at 
least one means of access. 

600.10 Chimneys and smoke pipes connected with high pressure steam 
boilers or other equipment producing similar flue temperatures shall be located 
and constructed in a manner approved by the Fire Chief and the Building 



53 



Inspector. 

600. 1 1 Chimneys, smoke pipes and vents used for removal of heat and the 
products of combustion at normal or low stack temperatures, shall be of 
masonry construction or of insulated metal of a type approved by the Fire Chief 
and the Building Inspector. (See Section 903). 

600.12 Combustible materials within eighteen inches of smoke pipes, 
breechings, boilers, furnaces, or major heating or incinerating equipment, shall 
be covered with lath and plaster or other approved fire resisting materials. Floors 
under such equipment shall be heat and fire resistant. 

600.13 In one-pipe furnaces the space between casing and register boxes 
shall be not less than four inches. Warm air furnaces shall have at least one 
register outlet without valve or closure device. All boilers, furnaces and firing or 
heating apparatus shall be equipped with approved safety devices and controls 
including a high limit control. 

600.14 All equipment or apparatus requiring combustion shall be provided 
with adequate outside air supply. 

600.15 Rooms housing boilers, heaters, or heat producing equipment, 
excepting in one and two family residences, shall have walls of concrete or 
masonry at least eight inches thick, concrete or masonry floors and ceilings with 
a fire resistive rating of at least % hour. Doors to such rooms shall be at least 1% 
inches thick, covered on faces and edges with metal or asbestos board, and hung 
in metal covered frames with closers. 

600.16 Exhaust systems shall have continuous close fitting ducts 
discharging outside the building or in to an otherwise unused smoothly lined 
chimney opening to the exterior air. Bath room exhausts from one or two family 
residences only may discharge into an attic that is unoccupied and properly 
ventilated. If ducts are installed in inaccessible spaces they shall be of sheet 
metal or other approved fire resistive material and the spaces through which they 
pass shall be firestopped. Nothing in this Section shall prohibit the use of 
properly designed ductless hoods in one or two family houses, or in other 
locations approved by the Building Inspector. 

600.17 Private garages or car ports located underneath one or two family 
residences or farm buildings shall have floors, walls, and ceilings constructed of 
not less than % hour fire resistive material. The common wall or walls of private 
garages or car ports that are attached to one or two family residences or farm 
buildings, or adjacent walls of such structures that are within five feet of such 
occupancies, shall have a fire resistive rating of at least ^ hour. Openings from all 
such garages or car ports to any other part of a residence shall be protected by 
fire doors with closers. These doors shall be not less than 1% inch solid core 
flush wood construction. 

600.18 PubUc or private garages or car ports above, beneath, or within five 
feet of any building other than a one or two family residence or a farm building 
shall be constructed in accordance with the requirements set forth in Section 
500 for the buildings to which they relate providing, however, that in no case 
shall walls, floors, or ceilings, or any opening into adjoining spaces, be protected 
with less than % hour fire resistive materials. 



54 



600.19 Garage or car port floors shall pitch toward vehicle entrances and 
away from doors connecting with any other space. Such floors shall be at least 
four inches below adjoining floors or, alternatively, thresholds at doors 
connecting with other spaces shall be raised on curbs fo ur inches or more high 
above the garage or car port floor. 

600.20 Assembly, Industrial, and Merantile Buildings shall have glass plates 
about 15 inches square and spaced about 20 feet apart installed in aisles or open 
spaces in floors directly above basements or crawl spaces. Exact locations shall 
be determined in consultation with the Fire Chief. The glass used shall be 
capable of safely supporting the loads specified for floors in Section 900. 

600.21 Except as noted below, all buildings shall have glazed doors or 
glazed windows, or other openings suitable for access in case of fire, in each wall 
of each floor facing on a street, public place, or pubHc or private way. This 
requirement shall not apply to one or two family houses or their accessory 
buildings, to farm buildings, or to any units on the roof. These units shall consist 
of metal hatchways with covers which are automatically opened by heat sensors 
located within the building. The size, location, and design of the units shall be 
subject to approval by the Fire Chief and the Building Inspector. 

600.22 Approved automatic sprinkler systems shall be installed in the 
following locations: basement or attic storage rooms over 2500 square feet in 
area between firewalls, except in one or two family houses and their accessory 
buildings or in farm buildings; places of Assembly for more than 400 persons, or 
for more than 100 persons if located above or below the first floor; stage and 
back- stage areas, scene lofts, storage rooms, work shops, projection booths, and 
dressing rooms in theatres and auditoriums; places of High Hazard Occupancy; 
places of institutional occupancy if located above or below the first floor, or on 
any floor if housing more than 15 persons; places of industrial, mercantile, or 
storage occupancy if over one story high exclusive of basement, or if over 5000 
square feet in area between fire walls. 

600.23 Where sprinklers are required, the system shall be equipped with an 
automatic alarm system directly connected to the Fire Department 
Headquarters. Arrangement and locations of the sprinklers and alarms shall be 
subject to approval by the Fire Chief and the Building Inspector. 

600.24 Smoke and heat detectors with inside and outside alarms shall be 
installed in sleeping areas in all Residential and Institutional occupancies 
excepting in one and two family houses or farm buildings. Type, arrangement, 
and locations of this equipment shall be subject to approval by the Fire Chief. 

600.25 Excepting as noted below, attics or spaces between ceilings and 
roofs in all buildings shall be divided into areas of 3000 square feet or less by 
tight draft stops. These shall be constructed as follows: studs with plaster two 
sides; or studs with ^/i inch sheet rock with taped joints on two sides; or ^h inch 
plywood with joints backed; or two thickness of \ inch lumber with joints 
broken; or such other types of construction as may be approved. Draft stops 
shall be equipped with tight closing access doors. These requirements shall not 
apply to one or two family houses or their accessory buildings, or to farm 
buildings. 



55 



600.26 All attics shall have a suitable means of access. 

600.27 Metal siding or roofing on any building shall be grounded so as to 
dissipate properly any accumulating electrical charges. 

SECTION 700 
MEANS OF EGRESS 

700.1 Every building or structure or part or division thereof hereafter 
erected, or materially altered in use or size, shall have two or more adequate 
exitways providing safe and continuous means of egress to a street or to a safe 
open space with access to a street. Exits shall be as far apart as possible. The 
primary exit shall be an exterior door or a stairway. In Residential buildings the 
secondary exit may be a door or a suitable window with sill not over three feet 
above the outside grade, or opening on to a stair or an approved fire escape 
leading directly to the outside grade. See Section 700.6 for exits in 
non-residential buildings. 

700.2 Risers in Exit stairs shall be not more than 8 inches high and treads 
not less than 9 inches wide including nosing. Winders or odd shaped treads, 
circular stairs, cellar stairs, attic stairs, and fire escapes, shall be subject to the 
approval of the Building Inspector. There shall be no more than 15 risers 
between landings in any flight of stairs. 

700.3 Headroom at stairs shall be not less than 6 feet 6 inches measured 
vertically from tread to ceiling or obstruction above it, and on a Hne projected 
from the face of the riser directly below the tread. 

700.4 In one and two family houses and farm buildings one exit stairway 
shall be not less than 32 inches in width with continuous wall or hand railing 
projecting not more than SVi inches in to the required width, and one exit door 
shall be not less than 32 inches wide. 

700.5 In all Residential buildings other than one or two family houses, 
approved exitways shall be provided and located so that the maximum length of 
travel to an exit door opening on to the exterior, or to a stairway or fire escape 
leading to the exterior, is not more than 75 feet in buildings of Class 1 
Construction and not more than 50 feet in buildings of other types of 
construction. The interior primary stairway shall be not less than 3 feet in width 
with continuous wall or hand railing projecting not more than SVi inches in to 
the required width, and one exit door shall be not less than 3 feet wide. Exit 
corridors or passageways shall be not less than SVi feet wide. Where stairs and 
exitways serve more than four family units or more than twelve persons, they 
shall be increased in width as directed by the Building Inspector. 

700.6 In buildings used for other than Residential occupancies, exits shall 
be designed in accordance with the requirements of the Department of Public 
Safety of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts as set forth in the General Laws. 
In any instances where the requirements are not specifically set forth, exits shall 
be equivalent at least to the minimums described in Section 700.5 above, or 
otherwise as directed by the Building Inspector. 



56 



SECTION 800 

LIGHT, VENTILATION AND SANITATION 

800.1 Every habitable space shall be so located in respect to grade level 
and so lighted and ventilated as to provide healthful and safe environment. Light 
and ventilation may be natural and/or artificial as provided herein. However, 
artificial light shall be provided in all cases in addition to natural Hght. 

800.2 Natural Hght shall be provided through windows, skylights, 
transparent or translucent panels, or any combination of these. Artificial light 
shall be provided by electric outlets and fixed or portable electric ftxtures or by 
other approved means. 

800.3 Habitable space shall be provided with ventilation by either of the 
following means: (A) natural ventilation through openable parts of windows or 
other opensing in exterior waUs that face on suitable open spaces above the 
adjoining fmished grade or above a roof, or through openable parts of skylights; 
clear ventilation area shall equal not less than 5 per cent of the floor area of the 
ventilated space; or (b) mechanical ventilation providing at least two air changes 
per hour of either outdoor air, or a mixture of outdoor and recirculated air in 
such proportion that a minimum of one air change per hour shaU be outdoor air. 

800.4 Floor levels of habitable spaces shall be no more than 4 feet below 
the average adjoining finished outdoor grade unless the spaces are provided with 
specially designed light and ventilation approved by the Building Inspector. 

800.5 Kitchens and kitchenettes shall have adequate light and ventilation 
for the maintenance of sanitary conditions, the safe and sanitary preparation and 
service of food, the safe use and proper operation of apphances and equipment 
therein, and for removal of accumulated heat, moisture and odors. 

800.6 Bathrooms and toilet rooms shall have provisions for privacy, 
lighting, maintenance of sanitary conditions, and ventilation sufficient to remove 
odors and excessive vapor. 

800.7 Ventilation shall be provided in attics, spaces below flat roofs, and 
crawl spaces. Location and net areas of ventilation openings shall be such as to 
minimize deterioration of the structual members from condensation or other 
causes, in conformity with generally accepted standards. (See also Section 
901.2) 

800.8 All dwelling units and every building or division of a building where 
people live, work, or assemble shall have a supply of pure water, a drainage and 
sewerage system, and at least one wash basin and one room containing a water 
closet. 

Institutional buildings, hotels, motels, lodging houses, clubs, and dormitories 
shall provide the equivalent of the above minimums for each group of six 
persons or less accommodated. Wherever cooking and food preparation facilities 
are provided, they shall be independent of and segregated from bathing and 
toilet facilities. 

800.9 Requirements listed above in Sections 800.1 through 800.8 apply 
generally to Residential occupancies. Light, ventilation and sanitation 
requirements for other types of occupancy shall conform, in addition, to the 

57 



Board of Standards Building Code and to all other regulations of the Department 
of Public Safety of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 

SECTION 900 

CONSTRUCTION REQUIREMENTS 

900.1 All materials shall be sound and of such quaHty as to insure ample 
safety and security to persons and property and to support all loads to which 
they may be subjected, without stressing beyond the allowable unit working 
stress. Twisted, bent or otherwise unsound construction elements must be 
replaced. 

900.2 All buildings shall be designed to support imposed dead and live 
loads. 

900.3 The dead loads in a building shall include the weight of walls, 
partitions, framing, floors, ceilings, roofs, fixed equipment, and all other 
permanent stationary construction entering into the building. 

900.4 Live loads shall include all loads except dead loads. All framed 
floors and stairs shall be of sufficient strength to safely support the uniformly 
distributed superimposed unit loads prescribed in the table below in addition to 
all dead loads of the structure and service equipment. For occupancies not listed, 
the Building Inspector shall establish the live load. 

MINIMUM LIVE LOADS POUNDS PER 

SQUARE FOOT 

Assembly 100 

Class Rooms — Fixed Seats 60 

Class Rooms - Removable Seats 100 

Dwwellings - Floors (except uninhabitable attics) 40 

Habitable Attics 40 

Uninhabitable Attics 20 

Exitways (other than dwellings) 100 

Garages (Private passenger automobiles) 100 

Garages (Trucks and public or commerical vehicles) 250 

Offices 100 

Light Manufacturing 1 20 

Storage (Light) 120 

Storage (Heavy) 120 

Stores and Markets 100 

900.5 Flat roofs or roofs with a pitch of less than 3 in 12 shall be designed 
for a live load of not less than 40 pounds per square foot. Roofs with a pitch of 
at least 3 in 12 but not over 6 in 12 shall be designed for a live load of not less 
than 30 pounds per square foot. Roofs with pitches greater than 6 in 12 shall be 
designed for a live load of at least 20 pounds per square foot. Live loads shall 
apply to areas of horizontal projection. Special consideration shall be given to 
the design of roofs subject to any unusual loading conditions. 



58 



SECTION 901 

EXCAVATIONS AND FOUNDATIONS 

901.1 All loam, peat, stumps and other organic material under buildings 
must be removed. At least 24 inches of space must be left between the remaining 
earth and the undersurface of wood or steel floor framing members. 

901.2 Ventilation: in basement or crawl spaces there must be at least two 
openings for ventilation, each not less that 128 square inches. An access door 
shall be provided (See also Section 800.7). 

901.3 Excavations shall be properly guarded and protected by the persons 
causing them to be made, so as to prevent danger to Hfe and limb, or to prevent 
adjoining soil from moving or caving, or to preserve or protect any wall, 
building, or structure from injury. 

901.4 Buildings or portions of buildings hereafter built or altered shall 
have :u. ^^ate foundations which shall extend at least 3 feet below any adjoining 
surfaces exposed to frost unless they rest on solid rock. They shall extend in all 
cases to undisturbed sub-soil or to carefully compacted gravel. No foundation or 
footing shall be constructed on frozen ground. 

901.5 Properly designed slab construction on well compacted adequate fill 
will be permitted. 

901.6 Waterproofing: A basement or cellar which is surrounded or 
supported by water-bearing soil shall be waterproofed up to a grade that is at 
least 2 feet above the normal ground water found. Drains or sump pumps shall 
be used where effective. 

901.7 Surface-bearing Values: Mud, organiz silt or unprepared fill shaU be 
assumed to have no bearing capacity unless approved by test. 

901.8 Unless otherwise approved by test the maximum allowable unit 
pressures under footings shall not exceed the following values: Tons Sq. Ft. 
Hard sound rock 60 
Medium hard rock 40 
Soft or broken bedrock 8 
Compacted gravel or sand and gravel 6 
Compacted coarse sand and hard dry clay 4 
Loose coarse sand (confined) 3 
Loose medium sand (confined) 2 
Firm or stiff clay 1 .5 
Soft broken shale or soft clay 1 

901.9 Bearing walls, retaining walls, foundation walls, piers, posts, and 
columns, shall rest upon footings or upon solid rock except as noted below. 
Footings shall be designed to support and distribute all loads and to avoid any 
possibility of unequal settlement. They shall be not less than 8 inch thick 
concrete and shall be at least 8 inches wider and longer than the walls or piers 
resting on them. Under piers, posts, and columns, footings shall be not less than 
2 feet square. Concrete foundation walls 10 inches or more in thickness and 
stone walls 16 inches or more in thickness will require no footings unless the 
unit bearing value of the soil is exceeded. Non-bearing wall and partitions shall 

59 



be adequately supported on footings, floor construction, or as otherwise 
directed by the Building Inspector. 

901.10 Foundations and retaining walls shall be designed with proper 
consideration for the amount of earth retained and the unsupported length of 
the wall. 

901.11 Where necessary because of inadequate soil bearing capacity or 
other special conditions, piles, caissons, or other foundation systems approved 
by the Building Inspector shall be used. 

SECTION 902 

WOOD CONSTRUCTION 

902. 1 Wood framed buildings shall have braced frames, balloon frames, or 
platform frames, but balloon frames shall be allowed only for residence buildings 
and private garages not over two and one-half stories high, or for farm buildings. 

902.2 Lumber Grades and Sizes: Minimum sizes of members required in 
this Code refer to nominal sizes. American Standard dressed lumber sizes shall be 
accepted as the minimum net sizes conforming to nominal sizes. Computations 
to determine the required sizes of numbers shall be based on the net dimensions 
(actual size) and not the nominal sizes. For convenience, nominal sizes may be 
shown on the plans. If rough sizes or finish sizes exceeding American Standard 
dressed lumber sizes are to be used, computations may be predicted upon such 
actual sizes if they are specified on the plans. The species and grade or the stress 
grade of all lumber used for load bearing purposes shall be shown on the plans 
filled with the Building Inspector and all such lumber shall be grade-marked by 
the Lumber Association manufacturing that species of lumber. When the grade 
of the lumber is not so marked, the maximum allowable working stresses for the 
species of lumber used shall not exceed the lowest stress values for that species. 

902.3 Beams and girders shah be designed for each specific case with due 
regard to the loads to be supported, the length of the member, and the allowable 
unit stress value of the species and grade of material used. In one and two family 
houses and their customary accessory buildings 6x8 wood beams or girders 
having an allowable unit stress value of 1200 pounds or more per square inch 
and carrying a uniformly distributed load of not more than 5000 pounds may be 
used on spans up to 8 feet. Under similar circumstances, built up beams or 
girders consisting of three 2 x 8's shall be limited to spans of not more than 7 
feet. Members carrying concentrated or eccentric loads, or uniformly distributed 
loads greater than 5000 pounds, shall be subject to individual design 
computations. 

902.4 Frame buildings shall have sills not less than 2 x 6 or 4 x 4 corner 
posts not less than three 2 x 4's, bearing wall plates not less than two 2 x 4's, 
and diagonal corner braces not less than 2 x 4's or 1 x 6 boards cut in. Corner 
braces may be omitted where plywood sheathing is used and thoroughly nailed 
Garages, porches, and minor accessory buildings may have 2x4 sills where these 
are located above concrete floor slabs. Except as otherwise directed by the 
Building Inspector, all sills shall be bolted to slabs or foundation walls with not 
less than Vi inch bolts located near each corner and not over 10 feet apart 



60 



elsewhere. Bolts shall be bedded at least 4 inches in to concrete or masonry 
below sills. 

902.5 Balloon frames shall have ledger boards not less tiian 1 x 6 inches 
notched into studs. Studs shall run in one continuous length from sill to plate 
and floor beams shall be spiked to them. 

902.6 Studs in exterior walls and bearing partitions shall be not less than 2 
X 4's spaced not over 16 inches on centers except that: (a) in porches, private 
garages, car ports, minor accessory buildings and farm buildings, stud spacing 
and size and arrangement of framing members may follow other reasonable 
customary standards; and (b) properly designed post and beam construction will 
be permitted. 

902.7 All openings shall have double studs for the full height of the 
opening with double headers or lintels bearing on jack studs. Lintels shall be 
designed to meet each specific case. The following schedule lists minimum 
requirements for lintels where no unusual conditions such as heavy concentrated 
loads occur: 

Spans less than SVi feet two 2 x 4's 

Spans SVi feet to 6 feet two 2 x 6's 

Spans 6 feet to 8 feet two 2 x 8's 

Spans 8 feet to 10 feet two2xl0's 

Spans over 10 feet - specially designed to meet the particular condition. 

902.8 Cross partitions shall rest on a wood shoe 2 inches thick by the 
width of the studding. Shoes shall be used with any partition not resting on a 
beam or where studs do not pass down on to plate of partition below. 

902.9 Bearing partitions over 10 feet high shall have at least one row of 
horizontal bridging of the same sized material as the studs. 

902.10 The floor of any attic whether finished or unfinished that can be 
used for storage or future habitation shall be designed for a 40 pound live load. 
(See Section 902.11). Unfinished attics having not over 5 feet of headroom at 
any point, and not readily capable of enlargement for future habitation or 
storage, may have floors designed for a 20 pound live load. Ceiling joists carrying 
only their own weight and a ceiling weight of not over 10 pounds per square 
foot, and if in locations where it would be impossible or extremely difficult to 
subject them to any kind of live load, may be designed without live load in 
accordance with the table under "No live load" in Section 902.1 1. 

902.1 1 The following table shows maximum spans in feet and inches for 
wood joists and rafters under ordinary conditions of use and uniform loading. 



61 



MAXIMUM SPANS FOR JOISTS AND RAFTERS 

(See Sections 900.4 and 900.5 for live loads.) 











Attic Floor 












Floors & Flat Roofs 


201b. 


Ceiling 


Rafters 






40 Lb. Live Load 


live load 


Joists 


over 3 in 


12 pitch 


Size 


Spacing 


Plastered 


No 


Plastered 


No 


301b. 


201b. 


Inches 


Inches 


Ceiling 


Ceiling 


Ceiling 


Live Load 


Live Load Live Load 




12 






6-10 


10-0 


9-6 


11-2 


2x4 


16 






6-4 


9-2 


8-3 


9-9 




24 






5-6 


8-0 


6-9 


8-0 




12 


9-8 


10-5 


10-8 


15-0 


14-6 


17-0 


2x6 


16 


8-10 


9-7 


9-9 


13-10 


12-9 


14-10 




24 


7-9 


8-5 


8-6 


12-5 


10-6 


12-4 




12 


12-10 


13-10 


14-2 


19-8 


19-3 


22-4 


2x8 


16 


11-8 


12-8 


13-0 


18-3 


16-9 


19-8 




24 


10-2 


11-2 


11-5 


16-4 


13-10 


16-4 




12 


16-0 


17-4 


17-9 


24-4 


24-0 


27-9 


2x10 


16 


14-9 


15-10 


16-4 


22-9 


21-2 


24-8 




24 


13-0 


14-0 


14-5 


20-4 


17-6 


20-6 




12 


19-4 


20-10 


21-4 


28-10 


28-10 




2x 12 


16 


17-9 


19-2 


19-6 


27-0 


25-4 


29-6 




24 


15-8 


16-10 


17-4 


24-5 


21-0 


24-6 




12 


22-6 


24-4 










2x 14 


16 


20-9 


22-5 






29-6 






24 


18-4 


19-10 






24-7 


28-8 




12 


11-3 


12-0 






18-2 


21-0 


3x6 


16 


10-3 


11-0 






15-9 


18-4 




24 


9-0 


9-9 






13-0 


15-6 




12 


14-10 


15-10 






23-8 


27-4 


3x8 


16 


13-6 


14-8 






21-0 


24-4 




24 


12-0 


12-10 






17-4 


20-4 




12 


18-6 


20-0 






29-6 




3x 10 


16 


17-0 


18-4 






26-0 


30-0 




24 


15-0 


16-4 






21-10 


25-4 




12 


22-3 


23-10 










3x 12 


16 
24 


20-6 
18-2 


22-0 
19-6 











The above table is based on grades and species of lumber having an 
allowable working stress value in bending of 1400 pounds per square inch and a 
medulus of elasticity of 1 200,000 pounds per square inch. Structural members 
for conditions, spans, and loads other than these Usted, or grades and species 
having different values, shall be designed in accordance with accepted practice 
and as approved by the Building Inspector. Tables showing allowable spans for 
some other common sizes, loads, and stress values are on file in the office of the 
Building Inspector and are available in most recognized structural handbooks. In 
the last two columns of the above table, the bending strength only of the rafters 
has been considered in the design. If deflection is a factor to be considered in 



62 



any uses of these rafters, the spans must be reduced in accordance with standard 
engineering formulas for deflection. In all other columns of the table the spans 
show will result in deflection of not over 1/360 of the span. 

902.12 All floor, ceiling, and flat roof framing shall have not less than one 
row of bridging for each 8 feet of span. Bridging shall be not less than 1x3 
strapping crossed and double nailed at each end, or an approved type of metal 
bridging. A row of bridging shall be required in any case where adequate lateral 
stiffness is not otherwise provided, and under any partitions resting on joists at 
right angles to them. Bridging shall not be omitted in two or more contiguous 
bays for the installation of pipes, ducts, or any other purpose. 

902.13 Cutting and Notching: In girders, beams or joists, cuts and bored 
holes for any installation shall not be deeper than 1/5 of the beam depth or 
more than 2 inches in diameter. Holes shall be located approximately at the 1 /3 
point of the span. 

902.14 Headers and Trimmers. All headers more than 4 feet long and their 
trimmers shall be doubled. Headers with 4 or more tail beams shall be supported 
on approved metal joist hangers. 

902.15 Roof rafters shall be adequately supported and shall be securely 
fastened at the plate and at the ridge. Wherever possible they shall be trussed or 
tied together with not less than 1x6 collar beams spaced not more than 4 feet 
on centers. 

902.16 Multiple Joists and Rafters: Floor joists under partitions running in 
the same direction shall be doubled and spiked together or, where separated for 
pipes or ducts, they shall be joined by solid bridging 16 inches on centers. 
Dormer windows and other openings in roofs shall be framed with double rafters 
and headers. Valley rafters on spans over 12 feet measured horizontally shall be 
doubled. 

902.17 Bearing and Anchorage: Floor beams or joists framing into girders 
shall be anchored, tied and nailed for positive connection. The ends of all beams 
or joists resting on girders or plates shall bear not less than 3 inches. Beams or 
joists framing from opposite sides shall lap not less than 4 inches and be securely 
spiked together or, when framing end to end, shall be secured together by ties, 
straps or dogs. 

902.18 Subflooring shall be 5/8 inch exterior glue type plywood or 3/4 
inch boards. 

902.19 Exterior wall and roof sheathing shall be 3/4 inch boards nailed at 
least twice at each bearing, or exterior glue type plywood at least 1/2 inch thick. 
Other types of sheathing may be used when approved by the Building Inspector. 

902.20 Asphalt impregnated felt or approved building paper shall be 
applied on all wall and low slope roofs before the outside covering is applied. 
This material shall be lapped 2 inches on horizontal joints and 6 inches on 
vertical joints. 

SECTION 903 

MASONRY CONSTRUCTION 

903.1 Regardless of any other guidelines outlined herein, the strength and 

63 



dimensions of masonry construction shall be sufficient to keep unit stresses 
within the hmits set forth in Sections 903.5 and 903.6 below. Unless otherwise 
specifically provided in this Code, all mason work shall conform to the 
requirements set forth in Article 6 of the current edition of Schoolhouse 
Structural Standards of the Department of Public Safety of the Commonweahh 
of Massachusetts. 

903.2 Brick for load bearing masonry or for fire protection shall be Grade 
A or Grade B. Brick for other purposes may be Grade C or better. Classifications 
shall conform to the following table: 

Grade Compressive strength in lbs. per sq. inch Water Absorption 

Average for Minim un for Average for 

5 bricks 1 brick 5 bricks 

A 4500 or over 3500 10% 

B 3000 or over 2500 16% 

C 2000 or over 1500 no limit 



903.3 Concrete Masonry Units shall meet the following specifications: (1) 
Load bearing units ASTM C90-59 or C 145-59 requirements. (2) Non load 
bearing units ASTM CI 29-59. 

903.4 Mortars shall be mixed with ingredients and proportions as noted 
below. Measures shall be by volume. 

TYPE A — For all high load bearing construction. One part of Portland Cement 

and not more than three parts of sand. Added lime not to exceed 15% of cement 

volume is permitted. 

TYPE B — For low load bearing or non-bearing construction. One part of 

Portland Cement to one part of hydrated lime (or thoroughly slaked lime putty) 

and sand equal to not more than three times the combined volume of cement 

and Hme. 

TYPE C — Prepared Mortars having strength equal to Type B and used in 

accordance with manufacturer's directions, may be used for the same purposes 

as Type B. 

903.5 Thickness of Masonry Walls — The unsupported portion of any wall 
or part of wall shall not exceed 20 times the thickness of such unsupported part 
in height or 30 times in length unless reinforced by adequate cross walls, 
buttresses, columns, or other approved means. 

Table as a guide for thickness of brick or concrete block bearing walls: 

Stories 

1 
2 
3 
4 

Interior non-bearing walls, or walls supporting only steps, stairs, landings, or 

64 



Basement 


1 


2 


3 


12" 


8" 






12 


12 


8 




16 


12 


12 


8 


16 


16 


12 


12 



Grade A 


250 


Grade B 


175 


Grade C 


125 


Solid Masonry Units 


150 


Hollow Masonry Units 


120 


Rubble Stone 


120 


Stone: 




Sandstone 


400 


Limestone or granite 


500 



platforms, may be 4 inches less in thickness than above minimums. 

903.6 Unit Bearing Values shall conform to the following table: 

Minimum Bearing Capacity of Masonry Walls (psi): 

Masonry Portland Cement 

Brick Cement Mortar Lime Mortar 

200 
140 
100 
120 
90 
110 

320 
400 

903.7 Masonry in Tension shall not exceed 50 psi in mortar or masonry 
unless properly reinforced. 

903.8 Minimum bonding for brick bearing walls shall be 1 course of 
alternate full headers and stretchers in each 6 courses or 1 course of full headers 
in each 7 courses. Where masonry units are used in combination with brick the 
same requirement applies if the brickwork is counted as part of the bearing wall 
thickness. 

903.9 In veneered walls, cavity walls, or mechanically tied walls the 
veneering units shall not count as part of the required wall thickness. 

903.10 CORBELLING: No masonry wall less than 8 inches thick shall be 
corbelled except to support fire-stopping. The maximum projection of any single 
course of masonry shall be not more than 1 /3 of the width or the thickness of 
the masonry unit whichever is less. Corbelling shall be designed so as to avoid 
any possible danger to the stability of the structure and where necessary, it shall 
be reinforced and/or supported or restrained by steel or reinforced concrete 
structural members. 

903.11 Chimneys more than 10 feet from a ridge or roof structure shall 
extend at least 3 feet above the point at which they pass through the roof. 
Chimneys within 10 feet of a ridge or roof structure shall be at least 2 feet 
higher than the ridge or structure. 

903.12 Except where metal flues are specifically approved by the Building 
Inspector, chimneys shall be constructed of solid masonry and shall have fire 
clay flue linings not less than 5/8 inch thick. Flue linings shall be installed ahead 
of the construction of the chimney and shall be bedded in mortar with full 
close-fitting joints left smooth on the inside. 

903.13 Flue linings shall be not less than 8x8 inches nominal size and 
shall start from a point not less than 8 inches below the intake or, in the case of 
fireplaces, from the throat of the fireplace, and shall extend as nearly vertically 
as possible for the entire height of the chimney. Flues shall be of sizes adequate 
for the equipment that they serve. Each flue in a chimney shall have 1 smoke 
connection only excepting that 2 pieces of gas fired equipment may be 
connected to a single flue used only for that purpose. 

65 



903.14 Masonry chimney walls shall be at least 4 inches thick and where 
built against wood sheathing (as on the exterior of a frame building) the wall 
nearest to the wood shall be at least 8 inches thick. 

903.15 All chimney walls inside a building that are less than 8 inches thick 
shall be smoothly plastered on the outside from the cellar or basement floor to 
the underside of the roof boarding, so as to be gas and weathertight within the 
building. 

903.16 No chimney or fireplace shall be supported on wood and no 
structural wood members or concealed wood sheathing shall be closer than one 
inch. 

903.17 Except as provided in Section 903.19, the backs and sides of 
fireplaces shall be of solid brick or other approved masonry not less than 8 
inches tliick. Where used, linings of fire brick or other approved materials if less 
than 4 inches thick shall be in addition to the above minimum. Fireplaces shall 
be build with sloping backs, smoke shelves, and smooth parget tapered smoke 
chambers. Flues shall have a cross sectional area of not less than 1/12 of the area 
of the fireplace opening. 

903.18 Fireplaces shall have hearths of non-combustible material, 
supported on a fireproof slab or brick trimmer arches. Hearths shall extend not 
less than 16 inches outside the chimney breast and not less than 6 inches beyond 
each side of the fireplace opening. The combined thickness of the hearths and 
supporting structures shall be not less than 6 inches. 

903.19 Prefabricated metal fireplaces and metal or ceramic stoves may be 
used where methods of support, insulation from adjoining combustible 
materials, and the type of chimney, are approved by the Building Inspector. 

903.20 No wood shall be within 5 inches of a flue pipe unless such flue 
pipe is properly insulated. 

903.21 Thimbles: A thimble shall be provided for each inlet. Thimbles 
shall be mortared into chimney masonry. 

SECTION 904 
REINFORCED CONCRETE 

904.1 General: Unless otherwise specifically provided in this code, all 
work shall conform to "Building Code Requirements for Reinforced Concrete", 
current edition, published by the American Concrete Institute. This code is on 
file at the Building Inspector's office. 

904.2 Concrete for principal elements (footing, piers, columns, walls, 
slabs, beams, etc.) of construction shall have a minimum stress value of 2,500 
pse at 28 day test. 

904.3 Cold Weather concreting shall be permitted only when the 
recommendations of the ACI are followed. This is essence requires any concrete 
placed in temperatures under 40 F to be specially controled by heating the 
materials, by protecting forms, and taking all other necessary precautions. 

904.4 Prestressed and Post-Tensioned Concrete may be used when 
engineered by a quaHfied professional engineer. 



66 



SECTION 905 
STRUCTURAL STEEL 

905.1 General: Unless otherwise specifically provided in this code, all 
work shall conform to the current edition of "Specifications for the Design, 
Fabrication, and Erection of Structual Steel for Buildings" of the American 
Institute of Steel Construction. This code is on file at the Building Inspector's 
Office. 

905.2 Steel for principal members of construction shall be a minimum of 
ASTM A7 quality. Used steel may be permitted provided the section is straight 
and free of holes, cutouts, etc. at critical points. 

905.3 Steel Joists shall conform to the "Steel Joist Institute Code of 
Standard Practice." 

905.4 Steel Deck shall conform to the "Metal Deck Institute Code of 
Standard Practice." 

905.5 Temporary bracing, shoring, etc. shall be installed in structual steel 
erection and remain in place until permanent framing is completed. 

SECTION 1000 

PLUMBING & GAS FITTING 

1000.1 Plumbing work shall conform to the requirements of the 
Massachusetts State Plumbing Code. 

1000.2 Gas fitting shall be done in accordance with the requirements of 
the Code covering the installation of gas piping and appliances of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 

SECTION 1100 
ELECTRIC WORK 

1100.1 Electric wiring and equipment shall conform to the requirements 
of the Electric Code of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, and to the 
directions of the Superintendent of Wires. 

SECTION 1200 
VALIDITY 

1200.1 If any article or paragraph, or portion of either, contained in this 
By-Law is invalid, the validity of the remainder thereof shall not be affectec 
thereby. 

and to see if the Town will raise and/or appropriate a sum of money foi 
the purpose of effectuating said By-Lay, or act on anything relating thereto. 

ARTICLE 47. Moved that the town vote to amend the Town By-Laws by 
inserting an article numbered 23 which shall read as follows: 

SAME AS PRINTED ABOVE) 
and that the sum of $5,000.00 be and hereby is raised by taxation to effectuate 
said By-Law. 



67 



AMENDMENT TO ARTICLE 47. Moved to delete from Section 102.7, 
line 4, "Maximum and", line 5, "$2,000.00 and" and the word "respectively". 

Voted unanimously by a voice vote to accept this amendment. 

Voted by a voice vote in the affirmative to accept the main motion on 
Article 47 as amended. 

ARTICLE 48. Voted by a voice vote, that the Town amend the Town 
By-Laws by striking section 10 of Article 4 which reads as follows: 

"There shall be charged and the Board of Selectmen shall collect a fee, in 
accordance with the following schedule, for each permit issued as required by 
the Zoning Law 

Projects costing under $ 1 ,000. 1 .00 

Projects costing $1,000 to 5,000. 5.00 

Projects costing $5,000 to 25,000 15.00 

Projects costing $15,000 to 25,000. 25.00 

Projects costing $25,000 to 50,000. 50.00 

Projects costing 50,000. and over 100.00 

ARTICLE 49. Voted by a voice vote, that the sum of $1,330.00 be and 
hereby is appropriated from available funds in the custody of the Treasurer, War 
Memorial Fund and that the sum of $5,170.00 be and hereby is raised and 
appropriated by taxation to obtain and set in place a bronze honor roll to be 
located at the Veterans' Memorial Park, so called, and to remove the honor roll 
presently located at the Town Common. 

At 11:30 P.M. a motion was made, seconded and so voted that this 
meeting be adjourned until Saturday, March 14, 1970 at 8:00 A.M. for the 
Election of Town Officials. 

ATTEST: 

Charles A. Marks, Town Clerk 

ELECTION OF MARCH 14, 1970 

The Town Clerk read the Warrant. 

To cast and/or give in their votes upon the official ballot for the following 
officers: 

One Selectman for three years; One Assessor for three years; Town 
Treasurer for three years; Town Collector for three years; Tree Warden for one 
year (to fill vacancy); Two Members of the School Committee for three years 
each; One Member of the Board of Health for three years; Three Trustees of the 
Cohasset Free Public Library for three years each; One Member of the Planning 



68 



Board for five years; One Member of the Planning Board for one year; One Water 
Commissioner for three years; One Member of the Recreation Commission for 
three years (to fill vacancy); One Member of the Recreation Commission for five 
years; Four Members of the Cohasset Housing Authority — One for four years; 
One for three years; One for two years and one for one year; and to cast and/or 
give in their votes upon the following question: 

QUESTION: "Shall the town, in addition to the payment of fifty per cent 

of a premium for contributory group life and health insurance for employees in 
the service of the town and their dependents, pay a subsidiary or additional 
rate?" 



Yes 
No 



The Polls were opened at 8:00 A.M. by Moderator David E. 
Proceeded to vote for Town Officers on the Official Ballot. 



Place. 



At 6:00 P.M., a motion was made, seconded and voted that the polls be 
kept open until 6:30 P.M. at which time the polls were closed. 

Ballot box registered 2384. 

The Warden declared that there were 2384 ballots cast, and that 2235 
names were checked on the incoming voting check list and 2235 names checked 
on the outgoing check list. There were 149 absentee ballots, one ballot was 
spoiled and 1448 ballots not used. 



SELECTMAN FOR THREE YEARS 

Mary Jeanette Murray .... 1579 

Helen E. Scripture 759 

Blanks 46 

ASSESSOR FOR THREE YEARS 

Eustis A. James 898 

Michael C. Patrolia 1398 

Blanks 88 

TREASURER FOR THREE YEARS 

David E. Trusdell 2041 

Blanks 343 



TOWN COLLECTOR 
FOR THREE YEARS 

Gordon E. Flint 2044 

Blanks 340 

TREE WARDEN FOR ONE YEAR 

(to fill vacancy) 

Louis C. Bailey, Jr 844 

Samuel F. Esposito 73 

Lawrence A. Figueiredo .... 492 

Peter G. Laugelle 815 

Salvatore V. Sestito 108 

Blanks 52 



69 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 
FOR THREE YEARS 

Daniel C. Cotton ...... 1163 

Alfred B. Haskell 352 

Peter C. Murray 207 

Uoyd W. Prescott 343 

William H. Reardon, Jr 929 

David C. Whipple 1141 

Blanks 633 

TRUSTEES COHASSET FREE 

PUBLIC LIBRARY 

FOR THREE YEARS 

John Bishop 1710 

EUzabeth F. Eaton 1240 

Richard D. Leggat 1436 

Richard B. Singer 1407 

Blanks 1359 

BOARD OF HEALTH 
FOR THREE YEARS 

Rene G. Chiasson 2020 

Blanks 364 

PLANNING BOARD 
FOR FIVE YEARS 

Henry R. Hidell, III 1843 

Blanks 541 

PLANNING BOARD 
FOR ONE YEAR 

(to viU vacancy) 

Julian Rifkin 1804 

Blanks 580 

WATER COMMISSIONER 
FOR THREE YEARS 

Rocco F. Laugelle 1982 

Blanks 402 

RECREATION COMMISSION 
FOR FIVE YEARS 

Arthur P. McCarthy 1944 

Blanks 440 



RECREATION COMMISSION 
FOR THREE YEARS 

(to fill vacancy) 
Robert L. Pennington .... 1820 
Blanks 564 

COHASSET HOUSING 
AUTHORITY 

W. Chester Browne 1724 

James R. DeGiacomo .... 1 777 

Samuel Hassan 1718 

Margaret A. Lynch 1720 

Blanks 2597 

QUESTION NO. 1 

"Shall the town, in addition to the 
payment of fifty per cent of a 
premium for contributory group life 
and health insurance for employees in 
the service of the town and their 
dependents, pay a subsidiary or 
additional rate?" 

Yes 518 
No 1593 

The vote was declared at 10:50 P.M. 
At 10:55 P.M., a motion was made, 
seconded and so voted that this 
meeting be dissolved. 

CHARLES A. MARKS 
TOWN CLERK 



70 



TOWN OF COHASSET 
RECOUNT 

April 1,1970 

The recount of votes for Tree Warden was held at the Town Hall at 7:00 
P.M. 

At 9:00 P.M. the following vote was declared: 

Louis C. Bailey, Jr ^^^ 

Samuel F. Esposito '^ 

Lawrence A. Figueiredo ^^^ 

Peter G. Laugelle ^^^ 

Salvatore V. Sestito ^^^ 

Blanks ^^ 

Total 2384 

STATE PRIMARY 

SEPTEMBER 15, 1970 

At 8:00 P.M., the polls were closed by the Warden. The ballot box 
registered 1615, the ballot check list at Entrance had 1615 names checked, and 
the ballot check list at Exit had 1615 names checked. 

The Town Clerk delivered 2177 Republican ballots to the polls. There 
were 1073 RepubHcan ballots cast and 1104 were unused. There were 1707 
Democratic ballots delivered to the polls, 542 were cast and 1164 were unused. 
There was one (1) spoiled - Democratic. All ballots were counted and tallied as 
required by law. 

The following vote was declared: 

DEMOCRATIC PARTY 
Five hundred and forty-two ballots cast. 

SENATOR IN CONGRESS 

Edward M. Kennedy 378 

Blanks 164 

GOVERNOR 

Maurice A. Donahue 131 

Francis X. Bellotti 104 

Kenneth P. O'Donnell 35 



71 



Kevin H. White 261 

Blanks H 

LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR 

Michael S. Dukakis 279 

Rocco J. Antonelli 33 

John J. Craven, Jr 24 

Kathleen T. Ryan Dacey 75 

James S. McCormack 78 

Blanks 53 

ATTORNEY GENERAL 

Robert H. Quinn 424 

Blanks 118 

SECRETARY 

John F. X. Davoren 398 

Blanks 144 

TREASURER 

Robert Q. Crane 405 

Blanks 144 

AUDITOR 

Thaddeus Buczko 408 

Blanks 134 

CONGRESSMAN - TWELFTH DISTRICT 

John J. Franey 32 

Robert M. Hunt 4 

Gordon J. O'Brien 39 

Gerry E. Studds 430 

Blanks 37 

COUNCILLOR 

Nicholas W. Mitchell 183 

Peter J. Cummings 73 

John A. Langlois 121 

Blanks 165 

SENATOR 

Raymond E. Buchan 127 

Allan R. McKinnon 260 

Blanks 155 



72 



REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 

Francis P. Gilman 2 

Joseph W. MacDonald 2 

Blanks 538 

DISTRICT ATTORNEY 

George G. Burke 387 

Blanks 155 

CLERK OF COURTS 

John P. Concannon 370 

Blanks 172 

REGISTER OF DEEDS 

Barry T. Hannon 370 

Blanks 172 

COUNTY COMMISSIONER 

Thomas K. McManus 363 

Blanks 179 

REPUBLICAN PARTY 

One thousand and seventy three ballots cast 

SENATOR IN CONGRESS 

Josiah A. Spaulding 645 

John J. McCarthy 351 

Blanks 77 

GOVERNOR 

Francis W. Sargent 961 

Blanks 112 

LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR 

Donald R. Dwight 920 

Blanks 153 

ATTORNEY GENERAL 

Donald L. Conn 893 

Blanks 180 

SECRETARY 

Mary B. Newman 907 

Blanks 166 

TREASURER 

Frederick D. Hannon 887 

Blanks 186 

73 



AUDITOR 

Frank P. Bucci 886 

Blanks 187 

CONGRESSMAN 

Hastings Keith 170 

William D. Weeks 889 

Blanks 14 

COUNCILLOR 

Allen E. Days 18 

Edward E. Tower 2 

Blanks 1053 

SENATOR 

Charles W. Mann 858 

Blanks 215 

REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 

George C. Young 938 

Blanks 135 

DISTRICT ATTORNEY 

Ralph Farrell 1 

J. Blake Thaxter, Jr 1 

Blanks 1071 

CLERK OF COURTS 

John H. Winters, Jr 1 

Blanks 1072 

REGISTER OF DEEDS 

James A. Shannon 777 

Phyllis Godwin 1 

Blanks 295 

COUNTY COMMISSIONER 

George H. Feran 3 

Benjamin LeClair 1 

Edward Tower 1 

Blanks 1068 



74 



STATE ELECTION 
NOVEMBER 3, 1970 



The Warden opened the polls at 
8:00 A.M. after examining the ballot 
boxes. Ballot boxes number one and 
two registered 0000. Proceeded to 
vote on the official ballot. 

At 1:30 A.M., the following vote 
was declared: 

SENATOR IN CONGRESS 
Edward M. Kennedy . . . . 1271 

Josiah A. Spaulding 1636 

Lawrence Gilfedder 12 

Mark R.Shaw 16 

Blanks 113 

LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR 

Sargent and Swight 2066 

White and Dukakis 812 

Albert E. Bates 8 

Francis A. Votano 1 

Blanks 161 

SECRETARY 

John F. X. Davoren 1000 

Mary B. Newman 1943 

Murvin A. Becker 5 

Edgar E. Gaudet 9 

Blanks 91 

AUDITOR 

Thaddeus Buczko 1465 

FrankP. Bucci 1440 

Raymond J. Gray 13 

Roger I. Williams 4 

Blanks 126 

COUNCILLOR 

Nicholas W. Mitchell .... 1790 

Roy Fitzsimmons 1 

Blanks 1257 



REPRESENTATIVE IN 

GENERAL COURT 

SECOND PLYMOUTH DISTRICT 

George C. Young 2359 

Wm. E. Spink 1 

Blanks . 688 

CLERK OF COURTS 

John P. Concannon 1839 

Blanks 1209 

COUNTY COMMISSIONER 

Thomas K. McManus .... 1743 
Blanks 1305 

GOVERNOR 

Sargent and Dwight 2066 

White and Dukakis 812 

Henning A. Blomen 1 

John Charles Hedges 7 

Blanks 162 

ATTORNEY GENERAL 

Donald L. Conn 1610 

Robert H. Quinn ...... 1339 

Willy N. Hogseth 8 

Blanks 91 

TREASURER 

Robert Q. Crane 1359 

Frederick D. Hannon . . . . 1541 

John B. Lauder 6 

Roy K.Nelson 14 

Blanks 128 

CONGRESSMAN 

Hastings Keith 1522 

Gerry E. Studds 1486 

William Weeks 2 

Blanks 38 



75 



SENATOR 

Charles W. Mann 1789 

Allan R. McKinnon 1094 

Blanks 165 

DISTRICT ATTORNEY 

George G. Burke 1922 

Blanks 1126 

REGISTER OF DEEDS 

Barry T. Hannon 1111 

James A. Shannon 1600 

Blanks 337 

QUESTION NO. 1 

YES 860 

NO 1835 

BLANKS 353 

QUESTION NO. 2 

YES 2138 

NO 580 

BLANKS 330 

QUESTION NO. 3 

YES 1602 

NO 1139 

BLANKSd307 



QUESTION NO. 4 

YES 1537 

NO 906 

BLANKS 605 

QUESTION NO. 5 

A 270 

B 1673 

C 854 

BLANKS 251 

QUESTION NO. 6 

A. Yes 2237 

NO 435 

BLANKS 376 

B.Yes 2087 

NO 400 

BLANKS 561 

C. YES 2144 

NO 361 

BLANKS 543 

D. YES 2145 

NO 345 

BLANKS 558 



TOWN OF COHASSET 
RECOUNT 

November 23, 1970 

The recount of votes for the office of Congressman, Twelfth District was 
held at the Town Hall at 7:00 P.M. 

At 10:00 P.M. the following vote was declared: 

Hastings Keith 1522 

Gerry E. Studds 1485 

William Weeks 1 

Blanks 40 

Total 3048 



76 



At 10:00 P.M., the meeting was dissolved. 
ATTEST: 

CHARLES A. MARKS 

Town Clerk 

VITAL STATISTICS 

Records of Births, Marriages and Deaths Recorded in 1970 

BIRTHS 

Total number of births recorded was ninety-nine, of which eight were 
delayed returns and corrections of past years. Of the ninety-one born in the year 
1970 all the parents were residents of Cohasset. There were fifty-four males and 
thirty-eight females. 

PARENTS, BE SURE TO RECORD THE BIRTH OF YOUR CHILD WITH 
GIVEN NAME IN FULL. 

"Parents within forty days after the birth of a child and every 
householder, within forty days after a birth in his house, shall cause notice 
thereof to be given to the Clerk of the Town where such child is born." 

Many times returns are made by doctors and hospitals, before a child has 
been named. Make certain your child's name is recorded. 

MARRIAGES 

Total number of marriages was ninety-three, including those where both 
parties were non-residents of Cohasset. Fifty-three were solemnized in Cohasset 
during the current year. 

DEATHS 

Total number of deaths was one hundred and twenty-two, including 
residents of Cohasset who died elsewhere and non-residents who died in 
Cohasset. Of the seventy who were residents of Cohasset, thirty-five were males 
and thirty-five were females. There were two delayed returns of deaths, two 
males. 



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89 



DEATHS FOR THE YEAR 1970 



Date 



Name 



Y. 



M. 



January 

4 

4 

9 
12 
15 
16 
18 
20 
20 
22 
23 
23 
24 
24 
26 

February 

3 
11 
13 
19 
20 
28 

March 

6 

7 

9 
13 
13 
13 
16 
16 
19 
19 
20 
21 
31 

April 

3 

5 
21 
21 
25 
25 
25 
26 
27 
27 



Charles W. Orcutt 


84 


3 


21 


Theresa (Herrick) McNulty 


35 


11 


16 


Manuel Perry Silvia 


69 


2 


3 


EUa J. Vinal 


93 


7 


20 


John H. Levis 


87 








Helen Elizabeth Buckley 


82 


9 


9 


William H. Taylor, Jr. 


50 


11 ' 


22 


Mary C. Leonard 


75 


6 


6 


Gladys H. Myers 


67 


11 


22 


Percy M. Hendrie 


83 


1 


4 


Mildred (Thayer) Browne 


81 


4 


24 


Don W. Freeman 


80 








Benjamin Lewis Kelley 


76 


9 


22 


Marguerite (Courtney) Sharbell 


72 


7 


29 


Leonard Cotton 


77 


7 


29 


Daniel O'ConneU 


72 


2 


11 


Joseph Glynn 


51 


3 


21 


Florence Simas 


85 


4 


28 


Margaret A. Gately (Kirby) 


83 


4 


13 


Joseph H. Sherman 


86 


7 


6 


Bernice R. (Reilly) Hetue 


73 


5 


27 


Jennie (MacKenzie) Bates 


88 


10 


16 


Eva (Sampson) O'Hearn 


72 


10 


26 


Harry Whitin Brewer 


55 


2 


9 


Andrew McGoldrick 


78 


4 


19 


Vincent Nardo 


45 


10 


16 


Catherine Whitney 


88 


5 


15 


Judson Kernen 


60 


7 


26 


Rose E. Lyons 


84 


1 


20 


Elizabeth M. Hall (McGuiness) 


68 








Merle Davis 


68 








Edwin Frank Egan 


62 








Walter W. Parker 


62 


9 


4 


Katherine Kennedy 


87 


7 


28 


Catherine (Merlino) Rando 


82 








EUiot F. Magoun 


84 


2 


9 


J. Otis Hall 


73 








Fred M. Dellorfano 


67 








Julio Lopes 


80 


1 


10 


Anna (Ware) Williams 


88 


11 


9 


William S. O'Hearn 


71 


9 


8 


Ada C. (Kirby) Noble 


81 


7 


15 


Katherine M. Finn 


78 


9 


19 


Natalie C. Virgin 


77 


5 


16 



90 



27 
29 
30 
30 

May 
6 
11 
11 
18 
25 
26 
26 
30 

June 
4 

7 
11 

16 

17 

July 

2 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

9 

18 
18 
26 
30 

August 

3 

7 

7 

7 

7 

16 
16 
16 
16 
17 
20 
24 
26 

September 
2 
3 
4 



Helen Gertrude (Hall) Sellers 


79 


2 


8 


Edith A. Tourtellotte 


86 





2 


Katherine J. Keefe 


96 


11 


4 


Edith Cavanagh 


90 


9 


1 


Lottie (Warren) Beckley 


85 


9 


21 


Mary H. Overton 


85 


11 


20 


George W. Kautz 


55 


9 


29 


Gertrude H. Wilson 


83 


1 


29 


William C. Cox 


64 


7 


6 


George W. Morse 


87 


5 





William Gillies 


84 


8 


21 


Wallace Carlton Jones 


96 


3 


19 


Chfford E. Studley 


73 


3 


10 


Ethel L. (Sproule) Lemoine 


90 


3 


14 


Bernard A. Dwyer 


64 








Ahce M. King 


51 


11 


2 


Frederick A. Thayer 


76 


4 


19 


Wilham Francis McAuliffe 


65 


9 


15 


Abbie R. (Bates) Coy 


96 


11 


11 


Genevieve Crosby 


72 


8 


30 


Muriel (Morton) Hunt 


72 


10 


28 


Esther (Thayer) Bloomfield 


85 


10 


18 


Stephen M. Cone 


16 


7 


13 


James D. Mercurio, Sr. 


67 








Edward Shepard 


79 


1 


26 


Joseph A. Locke, Jr. 


53 





7 


Ruby E. (White) Ritter 


67 


8 


16 


Florence A. Cortez 


72 


2 


6 


Agnes L. Watson (McCarty) 


80 


2 


20 


Baby Boy Fhnt 




Five 


(5) Min. 


Mary LiUian (Ainslie) Martell 


88 


11 


16 


Effie B. Whittet 


88 


6 


8 


Olive A. Turner 


81 


3 


15 


Richard T. Linnehan 


25 





6 


Robert J. Rowley 


59 


5 


3 


Victoria Penney 


89 


6 


1 


Arvind Kumar L. Shah 


26 


5 


18 


Nitin Kumar L. Shah 


17 


8 


1 


James A. Wright 


90 


1 


14 


Leo R. Muldoon 


63 


8 


10 


Neil F. Cadigan 


86 


11 


27 


Frederick W. Epple 


57 


8 


3 


Marjorie Fay 


82 


9 


19 


John J. Oliver 


85 


10 


2 


John J. O'Brien 


82 


1 






91 



8 
10 

15 
16 
16 
19 
21 
22 
27 
30 
30 

October 

5 

8 
10 
14 
15 
24 
25 
29 

November 

8 
24 

27 

December 

2 

4 

5 

7 

9 

10 
12 
15 
27 
29 
29 



Helen E. (Leighton) Dolan 


74 


6 


22 


Leon B. Garfield 


77 


7 


18 


Ruby Smith (Abercombie) 


88 


5 


24 


Raymond F. Finnegan 


66 


4 


24 


Shirley A. (Ainslie) Tibbetts 


41 


.2 


18 


Philip S. Russ 


62 


1 


8 


Emma Mae (McCully) Deuchler 


86 


3 


12 


Madeleine (Rainsford) Brigham 


84 


6 


1 


Marion MacLean 


43 


9 


7 


William Driscoll 


79 








Mildred Safford Barnard 


77 


2 


16 


Mae Munn Silvia 


85 


6 


22 


Mary T. Manning (Harrington) 


78 








Celia G. Ferguson 


86 


2 


7 


Lydia Garwood DeCamp Ross 


75 





17 


Mary McQuaid (McCarthy) 


77 








Raymond R. Andrews 


85 


3 


11 


Alice Burke 


85 


9 


2 


Mable Souther 


84 


4 


9 


Grace R. McWalker 


86 


10 


1 


Austin L. Freeman 


72 


9 


12 


Marie J. (Simpson) McLellan 


59 


3 





Olivia Gavin Cooney 


81 


11 


31 


Charles B. Marshall 


60 


5 


21 


Margaret Vartanian 


94 


2 


4 


Bertha 0. Maynard 


87 


1 


19 


Bernice S. (Barney) Bradbury 


79 


10 


6 


Peter Lauer 


87 


4 


4 


Eustace D. Cavanagh 


60 


3 


2 


LiUian (Reilly) Hurwitz 


80 


1 


28 


William P. Luscombe 


74 


2 


15 


Alice (Williams) Ring 


95 


1 


1 


Arthur L. Linscott, Jr. 


64 


3 


7 



Date 

1969 

December 
5 
14 



DEATHS NOT BEFORE REPORTED AND CORRECTIONS 
Name Y. M. 



Alphonse M. Wilson 
Edward W. Davis, III 



65 
26 



2 
10 



D. 



92 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF REGISTRARS 

Number of registered voters of January 1 , 1 970 3704 

Removed from voting list because of removal to other towns, 357 
death and marriage 

Added to voting list by registration, etc. 492 

Total number of registered voters on January 1 , 1971 3839 

ENROLLED TOTALS 

Republicans 1622 

Democrats 930 

Unenrolled 1287 

Any resident not listed in the Census taken by the Board of Registrars 
during January and February should inform the Registrars before May 1st. 

Meetings for the registration of voters arc held at stated times during the 
year. Notices of these meetings are posted in the Post Offices of the Town and in 
many other public buildings. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CLARENCE M. GRASSIE, CHAIRMAN 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 
ANNUAL REPORT 

I hereby submit my report as Sealer of Weights and Measures for the year 
ending December 31, 1970. 

A total of one hundred and thirty two (132) weighing and/or measuring 
devices have been tested and sealed. Operation of one (1) liquid measuring 
device temporarily not in use, was not sealed. One (1) liquid measuring device 
was condemned. 

The amount of one hundred and ninety two dollars and seventy five cents 
($192.75) for sealing fees was collected and paid to the Town Treasurer, 
Cohasset, Massachusetts. 



Respectfully submitted, 

Benjamin F. Curley, Jr. 
Sealer of Weights and Measures 



93 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE TO SURVEY 

THE ADMINISTRATIVE FUNCTIONING OF THE VARIOUS 

TOWN OFFICES, BOARDS, AND DEPARTMENTS 

During the past year this committee has addressed itself to several issues 
on which we feel the Town could realize either improved service, administrative 
or fiscal benefits. While most of these issues are still under active study and 
hence inappropriate for report at this time, one item has been adequately 
evaluated to call for consideration at Town Meeting. This issue is that of 
centralizing town purchases of goods and services required to operate the town. 
By this we mean such items as paper and stationery products, fuel, heating oil, 
maintenance and repair, and other goods and services common to all town 
departments. The possibility of regionalizing such activities with surrounding 
towns should be evaluated and explored. To properly evaluate the benefits 
and/or debits accruing from any action of this character will require in our mind 
a detailed study of the impact on present methods, expHcit determination of the 
nature of such a centralized service, and a reasonable extrapolation of its future 
character. To implement this study we recommend the establishment of a special 
committee composed of 5 citizens of the town having an appropriate balance of 
talents and time to insure that the subject will receive the level of detailed study 
we believe it deserves. This committee should report at the earliest possible time 
with specific recommendations and appropriate Warrant articles if indicated. 

The above recommendation will be presented for action at the March 1971 
Town Meeting. We believe acceptance of this resolution is in the Town's best 
interest. 

Your committee regards our charter and deliberation as an important and 
desirable town function. We, therefore, ask that this report be accepted as a 
Report of Progress and that the committee be continued. 

(Mrs.) Francis E. Charles 

Richard D. Leggat 

Stewart D. Sargent 

Edwin A. Young 

Philip N. Bowditch — Chairman 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL FACILITIES COMMITTEE 
FOR 1970 

The main thrust of the committee's work this year has been directed 
towards consideration of the lack of space existing at the elementary school level 
and alternative solutions to this problem. 



94 



This year all six sections of the kindergarden (three morning and three 
afternoon) are being housed in Trueblood Hall and the Carriage House at the 
First Parish Church, but this is not a permanent solution. In addition, space for 
music, art, guidance, and expanded learning diabilities program is inadequate. 

A space utilization study has shown that all the rooms at both Deer Hill 
and Joseph Osgood are being used essentially 100 percent of the school day. A 
study of projected school population for the next five years indicates the 
probability of Httle change in total enrollment. 

The committee has cooperated with the School Committee in sponsoring 
and directing the study of the Extended School Year as one possible solution to 
the space problems. Also under consideration are: (1) additions or modifications 
to present facilities, (2) relocatable or pre-engineered classrooms, and (3) a new 
building. The School Facilities Committee is aware that the School Committee 
and school administration are alert to all possible methods and techniques that 
promise more effective utilization of the available space. 

When the committee has finished its investigations of these various 
possible solutions, the results of the studies will be presented to the town so 
that, by some form of public expression, the town may take part in the ultimate 
decision. 

Several other items are worthy of note. At the 1970 March Town Meeting 
the committee sponsored an article in the warrant for the construction of a path 
across the recently acquired land between Deer Hill School and Old Pasture 
Road. This was to permit more students to walk to school and save on busing 
expenses. This article received affirmative action and the path was completed for 
the opening of school in September. 

The new playing field north of the High School was completed with the 
erection of backstops and the laying out of a baseball diamond and a softball 
diamond. 

All accounts for the addition to the High School have been closed and 
forwarded to the State Department of Education for their certification. 

Respectfully submitted, 

David C. Whipple, Chairman 

Lot E. Bates, Jr. 

Barbara W. Bliss (Mrs. Charles) 

Sheila S. Evans (Mrs. Donald) 

John F. Keane 

Barbara M. Power (Mrs. Jeffrey) 

Sumner Smith, Jr. 



95 



REPORT ON THE CONSERVATION COMMISSION 1970 

In 1970 a major accomplishment of the Conservation Commission was to 
engage the services of Henry R. Hidell Associates to prepare " A Comprehensive 
Plan for Conservation, Open Space and Recreation in Cohasset." This plan is 
probably the most important document to be prepared for use by groups in 
town; both public and private since the Benjamin Report in 1961. Since the plan 
was published in September, we and the Water Commissioner's are planning to 
sponsor an article at the next regular Town Meeting to create a new Flood Plain 
and Water Protection Zone around Cohasset's water shed area. 

We strongly recommend that interested citizens study the Hidell Report, 
copies of which are in the Library and at the Selectmen's Office. 

We are continuing in an effort to make sure that our Town will regain the 
position which existed when the late Howard Bates was Tree Warden of 
providing professionalism to this most important job. The new position of 
Superintendent of Trees and Parks, which will become effective in May 1971, 
provides the means for this to occur. Early in 1971, we will forward to the 
Selectmen our recommendation from over 30 applicants for this position. 

Because of our concern at the loss of sand from wind action at Sandy 
Beach, we have consulted with the Army Engineers to determine a solution to 
the problem. Their recommendation to erect a snow fence in the winter along 
the beach has been passed along to the Sandy Beach Association. 

A news letter containing information on the dangers of pecticides in 
addition to other conservation topics was prepared by the Commission and 
distributed to citizens through the school children, the public library and various 
stores. 

Resignations were regretfully received from John Barrett and Mary Jane 
McArthur. Penelope Place and John Chase were appointed to fill the vacancies. 

Penelope Place 

John Chase 

George W. Benedict 

Herbert Marsh 

Edward Woods 

John Bryant 

John Hubbard, Chairman 



REPORT OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT 

I herewith submit the Armual Report of the Fire Department for the year 

96 



ending December 31,1 970. 

As 1970 started a new decade ... it also was the start of a new era for the 
fire service. 



"Regulations for the Control of Air Pollution in Metropolitan Boston Air 
Pollution Control District" which were adopted by the Massachusetts 
Department of Public Health under provisions of Section 142 D, Chapter 1 1 1 of 
the General Laws are the basis for formation of this new era. Effects of these 
regulations were no doubt felt by all the townspeople in one form or another. 
They either prohibit or limit all outside burning ... the burning of leaves, grass 
and brush is prohibited, burning at the Town Dump is prohibited. 

These regulations and restrictions are going to increase the workload of the 
fire department ... to what extent remains to be seen. Response and hours 
spent at the dump have quadrupled in just six months under these regulations. 

Another segment of the new era for the fire service is the adoption of the 
building code and formation of a building department. The effects of this is not 
going to be as immediate as the air pollution regulations . . . but in years to come 
the benefits of safer and better construction will be apparent. 

In the year 1970 the Fire Department responded to a total of 325 alarms. 

The apparatus and equipment of the department is in good condition, with 
the repairs completed to Engine 2 a 1954 Pirsch pumping engine. The age of the 
apparatus ranges in age from 9 years to 23 years. Replacement of overage 
apparatus and equipment should continue on a systematic basis. The present 
stabilization fund was started for this purpose in 1959 . . . two years prior to the 
purchase of our newest pumping engine. 

Training of fire personnel is a continuing process involving both permanent 
and call firefighters. New materials, techniques and equipment are tried as funds 
permit. 

I would like to express my thanks and appreciation to all who have 
assisted this department in the past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Charles Piepenbrink 
Chief of Fire Department 



97 



MOSQUITO CONTROL, TOWN OF COHASSET 

To the Citizens within the Project's Control: 

Submitted herewith is the report of the South Shore Mosquito Control 
Project's activities for the year December 1, 1969 to November 30, 1970. 

The Project is a year round cooperative effort embracing the City of 
Quincy and Towns of Braintree, Cohasset, Duxbury, Hingham, Hull, Marshfield, 
Norwell, Scituate and Weymouth, covering a total area of 172.21 square miles, 
serving a population in excess of 225,000. 

The Project is authorized and acts under the provisions of Massachusetts 
General Laws, Chapter 252, Section 59, Mosquito Control Provisions, and 
Chapter 112, Acts of 1931 , pertaining to maintenance of ditches put on the salt 
marshes. 

The Project continued to base its program on three recommended 
approaches to a community mosquito control, giving priority in this order: 

A. Mosquito Source Reduction by use of two track crawler backhoes and 
scavels properly placed and maintained ditches on the coastal salt marshes, the 
cleaning of blocked brooks and streams wherever necessary, the clearing of brush 
and growth along swamps and stream edges, the filling in of small wet areas and 
grading of all fill removed from excavated ditches. 

B. Mosquito larval and pupal reduction, by use of helicopter and fixed 
wing aircraft, power sprayer mounted on trucks and Jeeps, pack power and 
pump sprayers, spray all noted breeding sites. 

C. Mosquito adult reduction, by use of power mist blowers, thermal 
foggers, treat areas of mosquitoes resting and emerging 

Accomplished in report period: 
39,955 cu. feet of new ditch 
435,600 cu. feet of reclaimed ditch 
2,400 cu. feet ditches, streams, creeks, cleaned 
40,205 sq. feet brushing 

13,967 gallons of insecticide at approximate rate of one gallon to the acre 
for larval control - " 

2,340 gallons of insecticide treated 25,614 storm catch-basins. 
1,061 man hours were spent checking for mosquito breeding 
3,805 gallons of insecticides applied for adult control 

Eastern Equine Encephalitis, a serious virus diesase affecting both man and 
horse, transmitted by the mosquito from birds, reached an epidemic rate in 



98 



horses this past summer. There were 53 horse cases and 1 human case in 
Massachusetts, 7 of these horse cases were recorded in this Project's area. A 
step-up spray operation was made to all horse areas of the project. 

The insecticides used by the Project, the formulation and the dosage rates 
are in accord with the recommendation of the University of Massachusetts 
Extension Service "1970 Review of Insecticides for Mosquito Control," and 
approved by Massachusetts D.P.H. Pesticide Board. D.D.T. and other related 
materials are not used. 

The Project wishes to acknowledge all assistance it received from the 
officials and departments of the communities it serves and give notice that it 
shall always remain ready with its personnel and equipment to continue to serve 
these wherever and whenever it is called upon. 



REPORT OF THE SOUTH SHORE REGIONAL 
SCHOOL DISTRICT COMMITTEE 

This year we expanded our offerings to eleven trades by the addition of a 
course in Automotive Light Repair. This will provide instruction for students 
who will be placed in smaller garages and service stations. 

The additional course in Combination Welding we estabHshed two years 
ago has received a Federal Aid committment of $11,468 for equipment and 
salaries. From this course were sent out our first cooperative plan students. They 
will alternate, one week in industry, with one week in school. 

Our outside carpentry project this year is a large building to house the 
South Shore Natural Science Center in Norwell. This is a fine example of youth 
serving youth since our young men will erect a project dedicated to the 
education of South Shore youth in the natural sciences. Our electrical 
department will provide the wiring and electric heating for this project. The mill 
carpentry department will eventually furnish the display cases, built-in case 
work, etc. 

In our drafting department, we are providing instruction for several 
students with physical handicaps. This is in addition to our regular drafting 
program. 

We have continued to upgrade shop equipment with the addition of a 
drum Sander and straight line rip saw in the mill carpentry department. A larger 
spot welder and several wire feeders were added to the metal department. In the 
machine shop, a larger surface grinder and two metal-working lathes were 
replacements for obsolete government surplus property. 



99 



There were 55 graduates in the class of 1970. The high quality of 
graduates is reflected by the fact that all of the students desiring to be placed 
were placed at a time when the employment rate in the area had risen sharply. 
The median hourly rate for the class of 1970 was $2.52 per hour. Most of the 
young men have received increases since being placed because they have been 
able to prove their worth. 

Of these graduates, three have entered the armed forces and four have 
continued their education on a full time level. Colleges selected were 
Northeastern University, Massachusetts Maritime Academy and Wentworth 
Institute. 

There were two graduates from Cohasset 

The October 1, 1970 enrollment was 324. With the opening of the new 
Auto Light Repair program, enrollment increased to 340. Regretfully, only nine 
Cohasset boys are enrolled. 

As of this year, facilities are being provided by the South Shore Regional 
School District for Vocational Teacher Training classes conducted by the 
Massachusetts Department of Education on Monday through Thursdays. This is 
a service to provide a source of trained vocational instructors. There are 
approximately 50 people involved. 

Respectfully submitted, 

John A. Geary 
Cohasset Representative 

REPORT OF THE MOTH SUPERINTENDENT - 1970 

Insect damage and Dutch Elm disease were very heavy all over the Town 
this past year. 

Oak Leaf Skeletonizer was very damaging, but use of the Mist Blower 
controlled them. 

Elm trees were sprayed with Methoxchor and Sevin to control the Elm 
Leaf beetles. 

Oak Leaf Skeletonizer hit the Town again in September and at that time 
the Mist Blower had broken down. 

POISON IVY CONTROL 

We have continued to spray all Poison Ivy Plants and Ragweed visible from 

100 



the street, or reported to us, with a mixture of 24D. 

DUTCH ELM DISEASE 

Methoxchor, a comparatively safe insecticide to humans and wildhfe, was 
used as a dormant spray to all Elm trees that could be reached by truck. 

There were 52 Elm trees neglected from 1969 that were badly infested. 
These trees had to be removed with the help of the Brockton Edison Company 
and the New England Telephone Company. These companies removed most of 
the infested trees. 

In 1970 there were 40 Elm trees and 20 Maple trees removed. These were 
in addition to the 52 Elm trees. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Lawrence Figueiredo 
Moth Superintendent 



REPORT OF BUILDING INSPECTOR & ZONING OFFICER 

The Building Department is pleased to submit the following Report of 
activities for the Period of Aug. 1 thru Dec. 31, 1970: 

This new department and my position was estabHshed as a result of the 
vote of the Town Meeting of March 7, 1970 adopting Article 47 — Building 
Code of the Town of Cohasset. 

I was appointed Building Inspector and Zoning Officer on August 1, 1970. 

As this was a new department it was necessary that specific procedures be 
established for the issuance of Building Permits and subsequent building 
inspections. 

Our procedures are as follows: 

A. Application for Permits: application forms. Building Codes and 
instructions are available at the Office of the Board of Selectmen. 

B. Acknowledgement of Application: after proper and complete 
apphcation is received, we acknowledge same by letter indicating that action will 

101 



be taken within 15 days and at the same time we notify the following other 
Town Departments of this application so that they may offer any comments or 
objections prior to the issuance of any Building Permit: Board of Health, 
Planning Board, Water Dept., Wire Dept., Conservation Commission, and Fire 
Dept. 

C. Issuance of Building Permit: if there are no objections and all other 
requirements are met, a Building Permit is issued along with a detailed 
instruction sheet which describes inspections required by the Health, Electrical, 
Plumbing, Gas, Fire, and Building Departments. All Permits are required to be 
Posted at the job site. When a Permit is issued all of the aforementioned Town 
Departments are notified in writing. 

D. Inspection of Work: during the course of construction the Building 
Dept. will make whatever inspections are appropriate, but in general will make 3 
inspections; one of foundation prior to backfilling, one of framing prior to 
lathing, and one at completion of all work and prior to occupancy. All other 
Town Departments will make their inspections at proper times and record same 
on the Permit posted on the job. 

From the period of August 1, thru December 31, 1970 this Department 
issued 24 Building Permits for various structures and alterations and collected 
$500.50 in fees which were paid to the Town Treasurer. Field inspections were 
made as required. 

I would like to express my thanks to the personnel of all Town 
Departments for the considerable assistance and cooperation given me during the 
past 5 months. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Maurice H. O'Donnell 

Building Inspector 

Zoning Officer 



REPORT OF VETERANS' MEMORIAL COMMITTEE 

The Veterans Memorial Committee was appointed in January 1 970 by the 
moderator as directed by a resolution passed by the December 1969 Special 
town meeting. The purpose of the committee to study and propose to the town 
a fitting and lasting memorial to the Veterans of Cohasset. 

The Committee met regularly during January and February studying 
proposals from various sectors, as well as surveying memorials in other areas. 
After much careful consideration it was the unanimous conclusion of the 



102 



committee that a proposal calling for a memorial constructed of field stone with 
bronze tablets to be constructed at Memorial Park would be presented to the 
town. 

The proposal also called for the transfer of available funds ($1,330.) in the 
custody of the Treasurer, Memorial Park fund to offset the amount to be raised 
by taxation. 

The March Town meeting approved the proposal and raised $5,170 
through taxation to meet the expected $6,500 construction cost. 

The Committee worked in the following weeks to finalize design, prepare 
specifications, advertise for bids and sign contracts to assure completion of the 
project for a Memorial Day Dedication. 

On May 25, 1970 the Committee dedicated to the Veterans of Cohasset a 
permanent memorial. The monument is located at Memorial Park at the harbor 
and is constructed of field stone with Bronze Plaques Memoralizing those 
Cohasset men who died in WW I, WW II, Korea, and Vietnam. The memorial is 
lighted at night and two American Flags fly 24 hours a day over the Memorial. 

The Committee is arranging for the Garden Clubs to maintain Annual 
Planting so as to assure no continuing cost to the town for plantings. 

The Committee in addition to the Memorial Construction, painted the 
Main Flag Pole at the park, had four park benches installed, an electric 
receptacle was also installed near the Memorial. Bumper posts were installed in 
September behind the Memorial to prevent automobiles from hitting the wall. 

Total cost of the project was less than the amount appropriated, remaining 
funds were turned back to the Treasury. 

The Committee received from Mr. and Mrs. C. David Strout of Arizona, 
the family of Cohasset's only Korean fatality, the flag used at their son's services 
in 1951. It was their desire that the flag be used in conjunction with the 
Memorial in some way. The flag has been turned over to the Selectmens' office. 

It is with deep appreciation that we thank the many town officials who 
were so co-operative in our endeavor. A special thanks is extended to the 
personnel of all the town departments for their help and to the department 
heads for their co-operation. The assistance and co-operation of the untold 
numbers of townspeople was also greatly appreciated. 

I would like to personally thank those committee members who 
work so long and hard on the project. 



103 



It is recommended that this Committee be continued indefinitely. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Glenn A. Pratt, 
Chairman 

REPORT OF THE SHELLFISH CONSTABLE 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen and 
Citizens of Cohasset: 

During the past year a total of two hundred forty nine (249) clam permits 
were issued, clear indication that many of our residents desire to occasionally dig 
clams for family consumption. 

As our population grows we can expect that requests for clam permits will 
also increase thus putting greater demand on our limited clam resources which as 
of now are rapidly being depleted. 

Of particular concern is the fact that I have been unable to obtain any seed 
clams from the State Department of Natural Resources for the propogation of 
our clam beds. 

In view of these circumstances I feel the Town should take steps to 
conserve our limited clam resources. BeHeving that the present limited supply 
should be conserved for the individual citizen who desires to dig clams for his 
own household use, I recommend that the Board of Selectmen discontinue 
issuing commercial permits for an indefinite period. Meantime I shall continue 
my efforts to obtain our rightful share of any seed clams available from the 
Division of Marine Fisheries. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Ellery C. S. Sidney 
Shellfish Constable 



1970 REPORT OF PLANNING BOARD 

In addition to the regularly scheduled meetings the Board voted to 
conduct a third meeting to be held on the 4th Wednesday evening of each month 
to- 

1: Update Cohasset Rules and Regulations for subdivision of a lot or lots. 

104 



2: Discussions and plan of action concerning the growing problem of 
covenant control of previously approved subdivisions. 

3: Town Planning. Details of a new procedure for the submission of a plan 
of any type are being developed. 

This meeting while open to the public is considered an Administrative 
session. 

The cooperation of Town Officials, Department Heads, the Building 
Inspector, and Board of Health Agent has been greatly appreciated. 

G. Scott Steeves, Chairman 

Henry R. Hidell, III, Secretary 

Nathan Bates 

Lawrence Ainslie 

Julian Rifkin 



REPORT OF THE COHASSET HOUSING AUTHORITY 

In 1970 action by the Cohasset Housing Authority consisted of a 
continuation of our efforts of the preceeding year. Meetings were held regularly 
on a monthly and semi-monthly basis in the resolution of our formal appHcation 
for funding. Unfortunately, a rather complete reorganization of the govermental 
agencies involved with housing has occasioned substantial delays in our 
programming and progress. 

It is hoped that the processing of the "paper work" will be completed in 
the near future and that our efforts will be evidenced in a more positive manner 
to those desirous of this housing. 

Respectfully submitted, 

W. Chester Browne, Chairman 
Mary Jeanette Murray, Vice Chairman 

Margaret A. Lynch, Secretary 

Samuel Hassan, Treasurer 

James R. DeGiacomo, Asst. Treasurer 



105 



BOARD OF SEWER COMMISSIONERS 

REPORT OF 1970 

The new waste water treatment plant is now being manned by a full time 
experienced operator. In addition to the High School complex, Fire & Police 
Station and the Bates Building, several dwelling units are now connected to the 
sewer line. All abutters of the Phase 1 line have been officially notified to 
connect to the system in accordance with rules and regulations adopted by the 
last Town Meeting. 

The system now has become a community service and will soon realize a 
revenue to the Town, through assessments and usage charges. 

The Board has approved several local contractors as qualified drainlayers. 
These contractors are so licensed and may perform all work necessary to connect 
buildings to the pubHc sewerage system. 

Our Engineering firm of Fay, Spofford & Thorndike have completed all 
necessary updating of plans and specifications for extensions authorized by vote 
of the Town. The long process of layout and title search for easements is now 
being carried out. Applications for Federal Grants have been filed with the 
Department of Housing & Urban Development. Hopefully, construction should 
begin by mid 1971. 

We would like to take this opportunity to thank the various Town 
officials, Boards and Committees for their cooperation and assistance and Water 
Department personnel who have operated the plant most of the year on their off 
duty time, also our Superintendent and new plant operator for their interest and 
untiring efforts. All of these people have helped to make our job a Httle easier. 

BOARD OF SEWER COMMISSIONERS 

Rocco F. Laugelle, Chairman 

Henry W. Ainslie, Jr., Secretary 

Alan S. Murphy, Jr. 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS 

REPORT OF 1970 

Your Board of Water Commissioners have this year proceeded with plans 
to augment our water supply. After interviewing several engineering firms, it was 
unanimously decided to have Sanitary Engineering Associates, Inc. continue as 
Consulting & Construction Engineers for the Dam, Reservoir and Treatment 



I 



I 



106 



Plant Project. At this writing, plans and specifications are being drawn. Land 
survey of the reservoir site is completed and application for Federal Grant has 
been filed with the Department of Housing & Urban Development. 

Regular preventive maintenance projects have been carried out by 
department personnel, but system expansion and capital improvements have 
been curtailed this year in lieu of the above project. 

Again this year, a record volume of over 240 million gallons of water was 
treated and distributed despite a total ban on outside use during July and 
August. This represents an increase of 15 million gallons over 1969, yet is 
somewhat less than the increase of the previous year. These yearly increases 
continue to strain our faciUties far beyond their designed capacities. 

Thirty six new accounts were activated this year, of which eleven were 
installed by the department and the remainder by private developers, bringing 
the total active accounts to approximately 1900, excluding all Town owned 
buildings and properties. Two hydrants dating back to the eighteen hundreds 
were replaced with modern type hydrants, one of which was relocated. Six old 
services were renewed and twenty leaks repaired. Approximately 1250 feet of 8" 
main and two hydrants were installed by private developers and connected to 
the system. 

With continuing growth of the Town and greater demands for a good 
quality water supply, your Commissioners are greatly concerned with the 
protection of the supply. We are combining our efforts with those of the 
Conservation Commission, Planning Board and the Board of Health to meet this 
problem. An amendment to the Zoning By-Law to create a water shed 
protection zone is the only practical approach. We strongly recommend the 
adoption of such an amendment in the interest of a continued safe water supply. 

The Board would like to express its thanks to all Town officials, 
Department Heads and Committees for their cooperation throughout the year, 
and to the Superintendent and Department personnel for their continued loyal 
and untiring efforts. 

BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS 

Alan S. Murphy, Jr., Chairman 

Henry W. Ainslie, Jr., Secretary 

Rocco F. Laugelle 



107 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

The Bicentennial year of the Town saw the enactment of a Building Code 
and the appointment of a Building Inspector who is also the Zoning Officer. 
Maurice H. "Bud" O'Donnell, who has assumed this office is administering these 
by-laws most effectively. 

During the year, our long time and devoted Administrative Secretary, 
Estelle Fandel had to resign from her position for personal reasons. We will miss 
her efficient services very greatly although the office is being capably handled by 
Mrs. Eileen Jacome. 

We have met many times during the year with the Conservation 
Commission, the Recreation Commission, the Personnel Committee, the "Baby 
Hoover" Committee and the Advisory Board with respect to carrying out the 
provisions of Article 29 of the 1970 Annual Town Meeting relative to the 
appointment of a Superintendent of Trees and Parks and estabHshing the 
responsibilities of that office. In trying to economize and increase 
communication among Town Departments the Selectmen held several meetings 
during the year with these department heads. 

The celebration of the Bicentennial year and the many events of the year 
were managed excellently by the Bicentennial Committee to whom go the 
thanks of the entire town. 

We also take this opportunity to express our gratitude to all Town 
employees, to committee, commission and board members and to all who have 
evidenced their interest in our town during the year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

George W. McLaughHn, Chairman 

Arthur L. Clark 

Mary Jeanette Murray 



REPORT OF THE PERSONNEL COMMITTEE 

The Committee met regularly at the Town Hall on the second Tuesday of 
each month. Additional meetings were held at frequent intervals during the 
months of November and December, and just prior to the closing of the Warrant 
for Town Meeting. The Committee is available for consultation with employees 
and other citizens of the Town upon request as well as at our regular meetings 
which are all open to our citizens. 

The Personnel Committee was again appointed by the Selectmen to be the 

108 



Bargaining Agents of the Town. The Committee is authorized to bargain with 
any and all employees who are organized to bargain for wages and working 
conditions under the rules and regulations of the Commonwealth. Most of the 
Committee's time and effort during this year was spent in negotiating with the 
Police Association members and their legal representatives in order to estabhsh a 
written contract between the Town of Cohasset and the PoHce Association. As 
of January 9, 1971, when this report was written, these negotiations were still in 
progress. 

The Consumers Price Index for the Metropolitan Boston Area was used to 
show the effect of inflation on the purchasing power of wages for the past 
twelve months, and the Municipal Salary Survey of 190 Massachusetts Cities and 
Towns was used to compare wages and fringe items with these Cities and Towns. 
The Committee also made special personal inquiries in neighboring towns 
concerning conditions of employment. This information was used to assist the 
Committee to determine its recommendations for the Warrant of 1 97 1 . 

Cohasset continued to rank high in comparison with other Towns of the 
State on all phases of employee compensation. 

We wish to thank all who have assisted the Committee in our work for this 
year of 1970. 

Respectfully submitted, 

G. H. Howkins, Chairman 

ANNUAL REPORT OF THE COHASSET POLICE DEPARTMENT 

To: Board of Selectmen 

As directed by the By-Laws of the Town of Cohasset, Article 3, Section 3, 
I herewith submit my report for the Cohasset Police Department for the year 
ending December 31, 1970. 

ARREST REPORT 



Males Females Total 

Assault and battery 1 1 

Attaching plates 4 1 5 

Breaking and entering, daytime 2 2 

Breaking & entering, nighttime 9 4 13 

Default 3 3 

109 



Disturbing the peace 

Drunkenness 

Failing to keep right 

Faihng to obey traffic sign 

Faihng to obey traffic signal 

False alarm of fire 

Failing to slow for intersection 

Having obscured plates on 

motor vehicle 

Habitual school offender 

Habitual truant 

Hunting on Sunday 

Hunting too close to highway 

Illegal possession of 

hypodermic syringe 

Knowingly present where 

narcotic found 

Larceny 

Minor in possession of 

alcoholic beverage 

Neglect of family 

No inspection sticker 

No Hcense in possession 

No registration in possession 

Not properly Hcensed 

Operating motor vehicle after 

hcense suspended 

Operating motor vehicle after 

license revoked 

Operating motor vehicle 

to endanger 

Operating motor vehicle under 

influence of intoxicating liquor 

Operating motor cycle after sunset 

on learner's permit 

Operating motor vehicle after 1 A.M. 

on junior Hcense 

Operating motor cylce with learner's 

permit carrying passenger 

Operating uninsured motor cycle 

Operating unregistered motor cycle 

Operating motor vehicle without 

hcense 

Operating uninsured motor vehicle 

Operating unregistered motor 

vehicle 



6 




6 


59 


5 


64 


13 


1 


14 


2 




2 


3 




3 



2 


1 


3 


12 


5 


17 


8 




8 


3 




3 


5 




5 


6 




6 


3 




3 


3 




3 


3 




3 


2 




2 


6 




6 


18 


2 


20 


2 




2 


1 




1 


1 




1 


2 




2 


2 




2 


2 




2 


4 


1 


5 


4 


1 


5 



110 



Receiving stolen property 1 2 

Refusing to stop for 

Police Officer 2 2 

Speeding 80 6 86 

Using motor vehicle without 

authority after license revoked 2 2 

Uttering forged prescription 

for narcotic 1 1 

Total 284 28 312 

DISPOSITION OF CASES 

Arrested on warrant 4 

Arrested without warrant 97 

Summoned by Court 148 
Released, Chapter 272, Section 45, 

Gen. Laws 36 

Guilty 197 

Not Guilty 17 

Continued 18 

Filed by order of the Court 1 1 

Dismissed 23 

Appealed to Superior Court 9 

Held for Grand Jury 3 

Arrested for other departments 10 

Total fined $4,155.00 



SUMMARY OF WORK DONE BY THE DEPARTMENT 

Accidents investigated, automobile 165 

Building found open and locked by police 288 
Complaints received at Headquarters and 

investigated by this Department 5260 

Duty calls from boxes 3495 

Fire alarms answered 83 

Firearms identification cards issued 49 

Hackney licenses issued 2 

Hackney operator licenses issued 6 

Mileage of patrol cars 1 23,040 

Mileage of ambulance 5,858 
Parking permits issued to Cohasset 

residents for parking area at Sandy Beach 2,978 

Licenses to carry firearms issued 63 



111 



Firearms dealer licenses issued 3 
Permits to perform work on 

Lord's Day issued 32 
Persons transported to hospitals and 

Doctor's offices in ambulance 175 

in police cars 60 
Special attention requested by owners 

of closed homes 443 
Street lights reported out to 

Brockton Edison Co. 434 

Special police details 985 

Summonses served for other departments 213 
Stolen property recovered by department, 

value $5,080.00 

Violation citations issued. Chapter 90C 363 
Temporary Guest permits for parking area 

at Sandy Beach issued 402 

Tags issued for parking violations 675 

I take this opportunity to thank all for the cooperation given the Cohasset 
Police Department during the past year. I hope that the year 1971 will be a 
better one for all. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Randolph A. Feola 

Chief of Police 

Cohasset, Massachusetts 

REPORT OF THE HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT 

Submitted herewith is the report of the Highway Surveyor for the year 
ending December 31, 1970. 

This year the Highway Department installed 31 standard catch basins and 
laid 2851' of 10", 12", 15", 18" and 24" pipes. One and one-half miles of 
mix-in-place was laid on various streets and private ways throughout the Town. 
7,851' of Type I Bituminous concrete was put down on four streets. 8,000 
gallons of liquid asphalt was used in sealing the following streets: Gushing Road, 
Hill, Norfolk, Ash, and Pleasant Street. 

The sand was picked up with the street sweeper and used later on to mix 
with salt for winter use. 

4,000' of sidewalks were resurfaced. $2500.00 was spent on pipe, labor, 
machinery to clean some of the brooks and streams. These projects will 



112 



continue. The Department also worked for the School, Board of Health, and the 
Government Island Committee. 

In a period of 15 years the Department has installed 395 standard catch 
basins, laid 40,211' of drain pipe and resurfaced 37 miles of roads and private 
ways. 

The streets were swept, street lines painted, catch basins, cleaned and 
drains repaired. During the winter months the men of the Department worked 
on street drainage and repaired equipment. 

One of the automatic sanders was rebuilt, thus adding two additional years 
to its use fullness. 

Chapter 90 Construction & Maintenance Funds were applied for. The 
Construction Funds to be applied to Elm Street, and the Maintenance funds for 
Cunningham Bridge; to sand blast and repaint the steel girders. 

The Highway Depa-tment has kept in mind the ever-increasing cost of 
materials and other inflationary items, as far back as 1968, as the Town Report 
will show. This year the Department has picked up one item for $1,000, and has 
combined two others. In doing so there is a $225.00 cut in the Highway Budget. 

The Department has six men who perform these duties throughout the 
year. 

I thank the men of the Department, Town officials, and citizens who have 
helped me during the year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Louis C. Bailey, Jr., 
Highway Surveyor 



113 



SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 

SECTION II 

A little over a century ago, Abraham Lincoln said "the dogmas of the quiet past 
are inadequate to the stormy present." That observation is as appropriate today 
as when it was stated, for the times in which we find ourselves do indeed demand 
thinking which anticipates the future, rather than that which relies on the past. 
If our schools are to be a relevant force in the shaping of individuals who will be 
productive members of their social environment, then we must develop flexible 
programs which anticipate the future. Recognizing that we do not know the 
world in which our children will live, today's educational program must neces- 
sarily be an enabling process rather than simply an instructional one. It is towards 
that goal that efforts to change the form and substance of our program are di- 
rected. 

During the past year the staff of your school system has been busy appraising 
existing programs and implementing changes where desirable. Work currently 
underway or completed during the past year includes: 

- A major study to determine the feasibility of an extended school year as 
a means of improving the quality of education, using existing facilities 
more efficiently and creating a more viable employment situation for 
teachers; 

- Pilot programs in differentiated staffing and cooperative teaching, devel- 
oped to explore ways of better utilizing teachers' expertise; 

- Development of an ungraded reading program which emphasizes levels of 
achievement rather than arbitrary grade level assignments; 

- Expansion of the program for children with disabilities, such as perceptual 
handicaps that prevent them from achieving their full learning potential; 

- Introduction of a drug education program which emphasizes the preven- 
tion of drug abuse and which supplements the instruction already taking 
place through the science and social studies programs; 

- Expansion of the high school work-study program to provide opportuni- 
ties for a larger number of students to participate; 

- Revision of the high school English curriculum to provide seniors with a 
more varied program; 

- Employment of additional guidance personnel in the elementary schools 
to meet increased demands for service at that level; 



114 



In addition, two positions were created to coordinate and initiate activities and 
services on a system-wide basis. A Director of Special Services supervises activi- 
ties and personnel in the areas of guidance, health, speech therapy, special educa- 
tion and learning disabilities. A Curriculum Coordinator is now available to work 
on the development of curriculum and instructional resources and to assume re- 
sponsibility for federal programs. 

During the past year, the school department received valuable assistance from 
several sources, and it seems appropriate to conclude this brief report with a 
word of acknowledgement and appreciation. The space which the First Parish 
Church has provided to accommodate our kindergarten program has provided 
much-needed relief to the problems which have been experienced during recent 
years as a result of overcrowding in the elementary schools; 

Some 75 volunteer aides who have been working in our school performing a va- 
riety of tasks have been of great assistance to teachers at all grade levels. The 
cooperation received from the Highway Department in constructing the foot- 
path at the rear of Deer Hill School and resurfacing parking areas at two build- 
ings have saved the town a great deal of money. Similar cooperation received 
from the Wire Department has also resulted in savings. The contributions of 
individuals and organizations such as the P. T. 0., too diverse and numerous 
to mention specifically, have also had a positive impact on our schools. I know 
I speak for the principals, teachers and School Committee in expressing ap- 
preciation. 

Nelson J. Megna 
Superintendent of Schools 



115 



COHASSET COUNCIL ON AGING 

1970 

ANNUAL REPORT 

I am pleased to submit the Second Annual Report of the Council on 
Aging. 

The Board has been meeting the first Wednesday evening of every month 
to continue to assess the needs of our Senior Citizens and to upgrade and expand 
our services. 

We are working closely with the Town Departments and organizations so 
that existing services are expanded, not dupHcated. 

The Information and Referral Service is now located at the Community 
Center and is in operation five days a week, eight hours a day, Monday through 
Friday, 8 A.M. to 5 P.M. 

The Drop-in Center at the First Parish has been used on Friday throughout 
the year for cards, knitting, needle work and conversation. 

We work closely in cooperation with the 60 Plus Club and their 
recreational program. 

Again this year, our group was invited to take advantage of the Flu 
Immunization Clinic that was held by the Public Health Department and the 
Social Service League. 

The Friends of the Library has seen to it that Large Print Magazines have 
been added to the Large Print Book Collection. 

The Recreation Committee has appointed a laison to attend our Board 
Meetings. 

Periodic Open Meetings were held including: a dietician who spoke on the 
nutritional needs of this age group; two lawyers, one who is a tax expert and 
spoke on the Income Tax return and the tax deductions available to our Senior 
Citizens and an expert on Wills and Trusts. A craft demonstration was held and 
our Senior Citizens had a wonderful exhibition of some of there own work. We 
had films, mostly travelogues and a luncheon. The luncheon turned out to be so 
successful, we were asked to repeat it. 

Many of our people are taking advantage of the events open to them 
through the School Department including concerts, lectures, films and sporting 
events. 



116 



At this time my Board joins me in extending our thanks for the courtesy 
and cooperation we have received from the Town Officials and the Town 
Boards. Our very special thanks is extended to Police Department for the use of 
their Conference Room for board meetings. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Arlene Cline, Chairman 

Frances Antoine 

Thomas Twitchell 

Kathleen Conte 

Edward Atkinson 

Elinor Kennedy 

Elizabeth Alemian 

Karl Kristiansen 

Albert Livingston 



REPORT OF GOVERNMENT LAND COMMITTEE 

1970 

As years go on the recreational use potential of Government Island 
becomes more apparent. 

Each year more residents, and non-residents, visit and enjoy this unique 
spot, to the point where the traffic and parking conditions are becoming very 
acute. 

The Blessing of the Fleet, sponsored by the Cohasset Bicentennial 
Committee, clearly brought out the tremendous asset of Government Island: - 
with a band playing on the Minot Light templates, a combination arts and trade 
show on the pier, the Harbor Master's office used as the radio control point 
accomodations of many hundreds of observers who thoroughly enjoyed the 
finest spectacle shown within recent memory in Cohasset Harbor. 

Through the good offices of the Selectmen and the Highway Surveyor a 
wood curb has been installed to protect the stone posts surrounding the Minot 
Light Memorial. 

We respectfully request that this report be accepted as one of progress and 
the Committee be continued. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Gerard J. Stanton, Chairman 



117 



Edward Figueirido 

Richard C. Tousley 

Frederic Wood, Jr. 

Mary Jane E. McArthur 

Prescott T. Cumner 

Clifford J. Dickson 

John H. Barrett 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

TOWN OF COHASSET 

Massachusetts 



For the Year Ending December 31, 1970 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

T. Gerard Keating Term Expires 1971 

John P. Reardon Term Expires 1971 

Sumner Smith, Jr., Chairman Term Expires 1972 

Ellen Smith, Clerk Term Expires 1972 

David C. Whipple Term Expires 1973 

Daniel C. Cotton Term Expires 1973 

SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 

Nelson J. Megna 

Helen Mitchell Bookkeeper 

Ruth Bacigalupo Secretary 

Agnes Brighton Secretary (part time) 

REGULAR MEETINGS OF THE COMMITTEE 

First and Third Monday of Each Month - 8 P. M. - High School 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

1970 

From 1960 through 1970 Cohasset Schools have changed considerably. 



118 



Our student population has grown from 1427 to 1910 and our professional staff 
from 75 to 120. 

To provide space the School FaciHties Committee established in 1960, 
made additions to Deer Hill School in 1962 and the High School in 1968. This 
year the First Parish Church has given the Town a license for the use of 
Trueblood Hall and the Carriage House for three kindergarten teaching stations 
for 138 pupils. The committee is grateful to the First Parish for sharing its 
facihties to help reduce overcrowding in the elementary schools. 

During this decade the minimum salary for a starting teacher with 
bachelors degree has risen from $4100 to 7200, and the highest paid teacher on 
the staff from $6300 to $13,788. These increases in pay rates were brought 
about by recognition of the value of teachers in comparison to other professions, 
to mandatory minimums set by the General Court, and bargaining by teachers 
associations in negotiations with school committees started in 1968. 

With the increase in number of students and teachers, higher pay rates, 
additional new space as well as older buildings to maintain and a cost-of-living 
increase of some 40% it is no wonder that school committees have been hard put 
to keep budgets tolerable. Thus the Cohasset budget for school operation has 
gone from $572,895 in 1960 to $1,843,565 in 1970. We are pleased that 
Superintendent Megna, by establishing closer controls and through prudent 
spending, was able to return approximately $50,000 at year end. 

During the early '60's the School Committee usually met without visitors. 
In later years visitors became usual and one or more newspaper reporters 
attended and reported on proceedings. In addition, frequency of meetings 
increased to cover the added work of teacher negotiations, reports from teacher 
curriculum study groups, and budget sessions. This past year meetings were held 
with the School Facilities Committee, the Cohasset Drug Committee, the 
Advisory Committee and some parent groups. There are regional meetings of 
many educationally oriented groups that committee members could attend on 
practically a weekly basis and a deluge of mail from similar organizations and the 
state's Department of Education further burden a committee member. 
Nevertheless, our main purpose is to provide quality education within our 
means. 

Looking over this period of the 60's educationally, the trend has been 
toward greater individualization. More guidance and other speciaUsts are 
available to help students overcome various learning problems. Increased use of 
audio-visual techniques and a computer have become aids to easier learning. 
Differentiated staffing on an experimental basis in Grade 2 this year appears to 
be a successful way to blend professionals and teacher aides for better education 
without increased cost. In Cohasset nearly 50% of the teachers have over 10 or 
more years experience, a plus for a good educational system and a prime reason 



119 



for a higher per pupil cost than surrounding towns. 

The report on the year round use of schools requested for October of 
1970 proved to need additional research. Therefore the committee will not be 
able to offer alternatives to relieve overcrowding in the elementary schools until 
mid 1971. 

The committee wishes to congratulate Superintendent Megna on the fine 
work he has done during his first full year in Cohasset. His leadership has been 
an inspiration throughout the schools and town. 

As the year closes with a considerable decrease in the economy along with 
increased unemployment and rising town taxes, already high state and federal 
taxes, quality education is at the crossroads. It is indeed difficult to make 
reductions without hurting the quality of education which has progressed so 
painfully through the 60's. We look forward to your continued support. 

Sumner Smith, Jr., Chairman 

T. Gerard Keating 

John P. Reardon, Jr. 

Ellen P. Smith (Mrs. Robert M.) 

David C. Whipple 

Daniel C. Cotton 

STAFF DIRECTORY 

ITINERANT STAFF 
(Persons Providing Services to More Than One Building) 

Name and Position Year Elected 

Gordon Bowman, Instrumental Music 1966 

Eleanor Croan, Speech Therapist 1966 

Paul Emanueho, Chief Custodian 1951 

Randolph Feola, Attendance Officer 1967 

Ethel Gormley, Head Nurse 1955 

Margaret Manners, 

Elementary Guidance Counselor 1969 

William McCallum, Jr., 

Director of Special Services 1956 

Nancy Peterson, Elementary Music 1969 

Harry Rodgers, Music Supervisor 1962 

Dr. Robert Sceery, School Physician 1962 

John Shaw, Curriculum Coordinator 1961 

Patricia Wunschel, Lunchroom Supervisor 1953 

Jeanne Viola, Secretary 1968 



120 



JOSEPH OSGOOD SCHOOL 

Catherine Mulcahy, Principal 1936 

Ay ers, Florence, Grade 3 1938 

Basiliere, Ruth, Grade 1 1966 

Bates, Rachel, Grade 2 1970 

Chumbley, Vivian, Librarian 1968 

Clark, Ruth, Grade 2 1967 

Colleton, Susan, Kindergarten 1970 

D'Angelo, Marilyn, Learning Disabilities 1970 

Degnan, Edith, Grade 3 1963 

DiBenedetto, Delia, Grade 2 1957 

Grigas, Gloria, Grade 1 1970 

Hall, Dorothy, Grade 1 1957 

Hibbard, Dorothy, Grade 1 1965 

Manna, Shirley, Transitional Class 1963 

Montuori, Dorothy, Grade 3 1969 

O'Quin, Violet, Grade 1 1951 

Piepenbrink, Harriet, Grade 3 1963 

Power, Marilyn, Reading 1968 

Reardon, Rosamond, Reading Supervisor 1952 

Rohrbach, Mary, Grade 2 1969 

Rucker, Mary Lynne, Kindergarten 1970 

Russell, Jane, Kindergarten 1970 

Terry, Rosamond, Grade 1 1946 

White, Nancy, Physical Education 1965 

Winiarz, Mary, Grade 1 1970 

Wyman, Lisbeth, Art 1967 

Other Staff 

Ainslie, Donald, Custodian & Bus Driver 1966 

Brennock, Henry, Head Custodian 1958 

Other Staff — Joseph Osgood 

Chase, Gertrude, Teacher Aide 1968 

Coe, Marcia, Secretary 1970 

Curley, Anne, Teacher Aide 1969 

Davis, Mary, Teacher Aide 1968 

Fink, Jeanne, Teacher Aide 1970 

Hernan, Margaret, Lunchroom 1970 

LaugeUi, Josephine, Teacher Aide 1970 

McLellan, William, Custodian 

(retired 7-1-70) 1959 

Piepenbrink, Shirley, Lunchroom 1969 



121 



Simeone, June, Teacher Aide 1970 

Stoddard, Florence, Lunchroom 1969 

DEER HILL SCHOOL 

John H. Creamer, Principal 

Archibald, Jane, Grade 5 1968 

Becker, Joseph, Grade 6, 

Science Supervisor 1968 

Chase, Patricia, Grade 4 1965 

Daunt, Alice, Grade 4 1953 

Deakin, Frank, Grade 6, Social Studies 1969 

Donovan, Mary, Grade 5 1955 

Harney, Nancy, Grade 3 1969 

Hartwell, Mrs. Everett, 

Aubudon Society Consultant 1970 

Henderson, Denise, French 1962 

Kent, Genevieve, Special Education 1969 

Kozodoy, Marilyn, Grade 6 1970 

Kuntz, Dennis, Physical Education 1964 

Maeder, Margaret, Grade 6 1968 

McArdel, Susan, Grade 5 1970 

MnCulty, Doris, Librarian 1969 

Mullen, Mary, Grade 6 & Reading 1953 

Murphy, Rosemary, Grade 3 1953 

Natkie, Joan, Grade 5 1969 

O'Malley, Jean, Art 1967 

Rega, Bette, Learning Disabilities 1966 

Russell, Gertrude, Reading Consultant 1961 

Searles, Susan, Grade 6 1969 

Shanahan, Elizabeth, Grade 5 1970 

Shaw, Leslie, Grade 4 1969 

Shultz, Lawrence, Grade 5 1967 

Til den, Lynn, Grade 5 

(resigned 12-31-70) 1968 

Tower, Doris, Grade 4 1956 

Trusdell, Eunice, Grade 6, Mathematics 1955 

Whiton, Ruth, Grade 4 1956 

Other Staff 

Arnold, Helen, Teacher Aide 1968 

Conte, Barbara, Secretary 1954 

Donovan, Alexandria 

Lunchroom Manager 1 963 

Hernan, Donald, Custodian 1963 



122 



MacDonald, Stella, Lunchroom 1966 

O'Neil, Helen, Teacher Aide 1968 

Prendergast, Shirley, Secretary 1969 

Sinopoli, Elizabeth, Lunchroom 1969 

Sladen, Nancy, Lunchroom Cashier 1967 

Smullen, Louise, Teacher Aide 1970 

Sorrentino, Louis, Head Custodian & 

Transportation Officer 1959 

Stover, James, Custodian 1969 

COHASSET HIGH SCHOOL 

Instructional Staff 

Richard T. Streeter, Principal 1970 

Gino Digirolamo, Assistant Principal & 

Mathematics 1959 

Kearin Dunn, Assistant Principal & 

Mathematics 1959 

Almeida, Frank, Science 1969 

Babaian, Mary, Guidance Counselor 1965 

Baltrushunas, John, Art 1969 

Bates, Dorothy, Mathematics 1962 

Beatson, Elizabeth, Mathematics 1969 

Buck, Margaret, Reading 1970 

Burbank, Virginia, English 1970 

Byrne, Juneanne, Special Education 1970 

Campbell, James, Science 1967 

Chatterton, Clark, Physical Education 1968 

Cisneros, Kenneth, Mathematics & Science 1970 

Collins, Curtis, English 1965 

Coultrip, Patricia, English 1964 

Davis, Charles, Chairman Mathematics 

Department 1961 

Dorr, Everett, Director of Athletics 1949 

Emmons, Ronald, English 1967 

Erbe, Samuel, Science 1963 

Erickson, Arne, Chairman Social Studies 

Department 1970 

Federico, Joseph, Spanish 1968 

Fortin, George, French 1970 

Franey, James, Science 1961 

Giffen, Marjorie, Learning Disabilities 1969 

Gilmartin, Stephen, Science 1967 

Girard, Maryann, Mathematics 1970 



123 



Glover, Hope, Home Economics 1957 

Gray, Carolyn, French 1961 

Hart, Stephen, Guidance Counselor 1970 

Hogan, Paul, Mathematics 1967 

Holman, Marjorie, Librarian . . 1966 

Incerto, Frances, Social Studies 1970 

Kelly, Donald, Social Studies 1962 

Kelm, Kathy, Art 1969 

Kittner, Nance^ Social Studies 1970 

Klee, Bonnie, Music 1970 

Lahage, Doris, Business Education & 

Mathematics 1967 

Leach, Edwin, English 1961 

Leary, John J., Coordinator of Guidance 

Services 1959 

Leonard, Laura, English 1937 

Lucas, Thomas, Chairman Art Department 1954 

MacDermott, Edward, Social Studies 1963 

MacDonald, F. Allen, English 1960 

Maclntyre, Marie, Social Studies 1970 

Mastico, Robert, Science 1970 

McCue, Louise, Social Studies 1970 

McGowan, Mary, Mathematics 1970 

Mika, John, Science 1970 

Narkiewicz, Paul, Chairman 

Foreign Language Department 1968 

Nash, Richard, Science 1962 

Nelson, Mildred, Business Education 1938 

O'Neil, Thomas, Latin 1966 

Plante, Patrick, Chairman Industrial 

Arts Department 1 959 

Pratt, Helen, Physical Education 1967 

Raccuia, John, Social Studies 1953 

Reade, Donald, English 1964 

Ring, James, English & Social Studies 1970 

Schleiff, Marie, English 1970 

Sheehan, Edward, Social Studies 1959 

Sullivan, Marion, Chairman of 

English Department 1931 

Thompson, Robert, Chairman of Science 

Department 1955 

Vernold, Vaughn, Industrial Arts & 

Mathematics 1970 

Walsh, Dennis, Mathematics • • • 1969 

Watson, Marilyn, Physical Education 1970 

Winquist, Priscella, French 1968 



124 



Wunschel, Frank, English 1955 

Wunschel, Patricia, Home Economics 1953 

Other Staff 

Ainslie, Cora, Lunchroom 1968 

Ainslie, M. Isabelle, Lunchroom Manager 1957 

Anderson, Nancy, Secretary 1965 

Barrow, Robert, Head Custodian 1953 

Brennock, Mary, Secretary 1969 

Casey, Dorothea, Secretary 1962 

Enders, Betty, Secretary 1959 

Harris, Ann, Lunchroom 1970 

Infusino, Albert, Custodian 1970 

Kelley, Margaret, Lunchroom 1968 

MacNeill, Andrea, Lunchroom 1970 

McNeil, Jeanette, Lunchroom 1968 

Ripley, Elizabeth, Lunchroom Bookkeeper 1968 

Salyards, Mildred, Lunchroom 1968 

Sandberg, Edward, Custodian 1968 

Sands, Louise, Secretary 1964 

Sargent, Kenneth, Custodian 1968 

Soule, Eleanor, Lunchroom 1970 

Soule, Kevin, Custodian & Bus Driver 1967 

Stover, Charles, Custodian & Bus Driver 1963 

Thompson, Jean, School Nurse 1963 

Waaser, Virginia, Lunchroom Cashier 1960 

Woomer, Mildred, Library Assistant 1965 

Bus Drivers (not listed above) 

Figueirido, Janet 1968 

Geddes, Nancy 1968 

Marks, Manuel 1950 

Pape , Charles 1966 

Pape, Maria 1960 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 

SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 

To the School Committee and 
Residents of Cohasset: 

It is a pleasure to submit my second annual report as your Superintendent 

125 



of Schools. For purposes of clarity, the report is divided into two sections. 
Section I contains enrollment information and other statistical data of a general 
nature; Section II summarizes significant developments in the educational 
program which have taken place during the past year and concludes with 
recommendations for future improvement of the school system. 

SECTION I - STATISTICAL DATA 

A comparison of enrollments on October 1 for the school years 1966-1967 
through 1970-1971 (current) is provided by the following table: 

Table 1 — Comparative Enrollments, Five-Year Survey 
Grade Year 

Level 

K 

1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

Spec. CI. 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

TOTALS 

** Grade 3 - Joseph Osgood School - 91 
Grade 3 - Deer Hill School 47 

*** Reported at performance grade level 

Table 2 provides a comparison of the enrollments in each of the three 
schools over a five year period: 

Table 2 - Enrollment Data Drouped by Schools - Five Year Survey 

Year Building 

School 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 Capacity 

J.O. - - 497 481 531* 425 

D.H. 534 560 557 553 521 500 



126 



1966 


1967 


1968 


1969 


1970 


110 


120 


123 


135 


138 


151 


129 


149 


142 


143 


141 


160 


121 


135 


159 


154 


149 


167 


**127 


**138 


161 


154 


157 


164 


131 


129 


163 


156 


164 


173 


146 


142 


176 


162 


165 


*** 


*** 


*** 


5 


5 


117 


141 


149 


176 


170 


115 


118 


141 


146 


183 


124 


108 


121 


146 


142 


102 


127 


104 


128 


150 


107 


101 


128 


108 


115 


86 


100 


99 


116 


98 


1643 


1712 


1791 


1854 


1910 



High 


651 


695 


742 


820 


858 


TOTALS 


1643 


1712 


1791 


1854 


1910 



1000 



*Kindergarten (138 students) is temporarily housed at the First Parish House. 

October 1 enrollment figures provide a means for comparing the school 
system's enrollment at a comparable time during any school year, but they do 
not provide an accurate description of the overall enrollment pattern. A more 
precise representation can be obtained by using a statistic called the Average 
Daily Membership (ADM). This is obtained for any given year by adding the 
aggregate number of days of attendance of all students to the aggregate number 
of days of absence of all students and dividing that sum by the total number of 
days that school was in session. The ADM for the two preceding school years are 
provided in Table 3. These figures include both resident and non-resident 
(METCO) students. 

Table 3 — Average Daily Membership: Two-Year Comparison 



Category 


1968-1969 


1969-1970 


NetC 


hange 


Elementary 


1,055.0 


1,056.0 




+1 


Secondary 


747.0 


820.0 




+73 


TOTALS 


1,802.0 


1,876.0 




+74 



In addition to those enrolled in the public schools, there are 201 school 
age children residing in Cohasset who attend school outside of the community. 
Table 4 summarizes the distribution of these students by the type of school 
which they attend. 

Table 4 - Resident Students Attending Other Schools: 1970-1971 

Type of School Number Enrolled 

Parochial 31 

Private Day or Boarding 1 5 1 

So. Shore Regional Vo-Tech 9 

TOTALS 191 

Table 5 summarizes student progress for the preceding school year. 
Table 5 - Student Progress: 1969-1970 

Category Joseph Osgood Deer Hill High School 

Completions — — 116 

Promotions 499 563 693 



127 



Non-Promotions 
Transfers 
Drop-Outs 
Deaths 


9 

17 






TOTALS 


525 



3 12 

11 36 

9 



577 866 



Activities of the students who graduated from Cohasset High School in 
June, 1970 are summarized in Table 6. 

Table 6 - Survey of CHS Graduates: Class of 1970 

Category 
Continuing Education 

Four- Year College 

Junior College 

Nursing Education 

Other Schools 
Armed Services 
Employed 

Business (Trade) 

Clerical 

Manufacturing 
Homemaking 
Undecided 
Travel 

Services provided to students through the school health program during 
the preceding school year are summarized in Table 7. 

Table 7 - Summary of School Health Program Activities 
1969-1970 

Type of Service Osgood School Deer Hill School High School Total 

Physical Exams 279 165 456 900 

Vision Testing 508 562 850 1920 

Hearing Testing 508 562 850 1920 

Immunization 1337 



Referrals for remedial care of vision defects — 75 number of students 
receiving correction action — 70. Referrals for remedial care of hearing defects — 
28 — number of students receiving correction action — 25. Referrals resulting 
from physical examinations by the school physician — 42 — number of such 
referrals completed — 40. 



128 



■Jumber 


Percent 


96 


82.8 


(73) 


(62.9) 


(11) 


(9.5) 


(4) 


(3.5) 


(8) 


(6.9) 


1 • 


.8 


15 


12.1 


(6) 


(5.2) 


(6) 


(5.2) 


(2) 


(1.7) 


1 


.8 


2 


1.7 


2 


1.7 



During the preceding school year, 106 students received corrective therapy 
from the speech therapy program. Activities of the speech therapist are 
tabluated below. 

Table 8 - Summary of Speech Therapy Services: 1969-1970 

Type of 

Speech Osgood School Deer Hill School High School Total 

Stuttering 5 2 7 

Articulation 35 48 2 83 

Hearing Handicaps 3 3 16 

Other 5 2 7 

TOTALS 1 48 55 3 106 



Referrals for orthodontic evaluation — 25 

Table 9 summarizes school lunch and special milk program activities for 
the preceding year. 

Table 9 - School Lunch Program Participation: 1969-1970 

Item Quantity Served 

Type A Lunches 177,506 

Mild (Half Pints) 91,723 
Lunches for Shut-Ins 

(March - June) 524 

REPORT OF THE TREE WARDEN 

The Tree Department had a $2,600.00 maintenance budget. $1,000.00 
was spent for roadside mowing throughout the Town. $130.00 was spent for 
new trees. Expenses for contract labor and repairs to equipment were met and 
the balance turned back to the town. 

The Maple trees lining the roadside have been severely damaged by street 
drainage, utiHties, asphalt and salt. Many of these trees have been removed and 
more are marked to come down. The trees that were planted nearer the property 
lines have not been effected and are growing well. 

The Brockton Edison Company helped in cleaning dead wood and 
branches over the wires. They also topped trees that were later removed by the 
Department. 

On King Street, Pond Street, South Main Street and Bow Street the heavy 

129 



underbrush was cut back. This improved the appearance and made vision better 
for traffic. 

While in charge of this department, I have at times combined the 
equipment and work force of the Highway, Tree and Town Common 
Departments to carry on the general town work. This method seemed to 
accomplish more work at less expense to the taxpayer. 

I wish to thank the poeple of the Town for their co-operation and support. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Louis C. Bailey 
Tree Warden 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH 

Personnel 

ANTHONY W. VENTO, R.S. 

Health Agent, Inspector of Animals 

FREDDIE PETERSON, M.D. 

Pediatrician, Well Baby and Well Child Conference 

MRS. M. MEDEIROS, R.N. 

Public Health Nurse, Nursing services by contract with 
the Social Service League 

CHARLES T. PATROLIA 

Plumbing Inspector 

EARL McARTHUR 

Plumbing Inspector 

This year has been a great deal different than other years as far as our 
health board has been concerned. With the advent of consciousness of ecology as 
a new concept to be introduced, we began to have problems with the town 
disposal area. First we were stopped from burning as of September 15 th, next 
we were forced into a sanitary landfill. This latter project is just starting and we 
have found out that it is going to be quite expensive. This means with the 
general increase in expense of operation we now have the cost of bulldozing the 
area daily and providing fill to cover the trash completely. We are projecting a 
tremendous increase in our operating budget for this coming year. 



130 



I would like to again express my appreciation for faithful service to the 
members of the board, our agent, the visiting nurses and our unpaid secretarial 
workers. 

Sewage Disposal 

New construction approved 34 

Alteration & additions 32 

Subdivision Investigations 2 

Final Inspections 69 

Percolation tests witnessed 29 

Short Form Permits Issued 29 

There were four dye tests conducted of which two were positive. 

Nuisance Complaints 

Sewage overflow 62 

Drainage surface water 10 

Animals 51 

Refuse 3 

Miscellaneous 16 

Total 142 

Food Handling Establishments 

Year round restaurants 12 

Seasonal restaurants 5 

Grocery stores 6 

Water Samples taken 18 

Swab tests of utensils 79 

Milk & Oleo Licenses 36 

Total Inspections 68 

Other Health Agent Activities 

Inspections of Day Care Centers, Day Camps, 

Nursing Homes 10 

Burial Permits Issued 78 

Licenses and Permits Issued 1 68 

International Immunization Certifications 156 

Anti Rabies Clinic Innoculations 230 

Influenza Vaccine Clinic, Senior Citizens 48, 

Town Employees, 27 75 

Court Appearances for Town 1 

Dead Animals to Laboratory for Rabies Determination 



131 



Test . . 3 

Receipts to Town Treasurer $793.50 

Plumbing Inspections 

Registered Plumbers 73 

Permits, New Construction 25 

Permits, Alterations 38 

Permit Fee collected $343.00 

Fee Payment to Inspectors $328.00 

Immunization Summary 

DPT 

Grade 1 53 

D&T 

Grades 5,9 159 

SMALLPOX 

Grades 1,6, 12 233 

HEAF TUBERCULIN 

Grades 1,4, 9, 12 449 

GERMAN MEASLES 

Grades K, 1,2, 3 443 

Well Child Clinic Immunizations 

Oral Trivalent Polio 45 

Measles Vaccine 10 

Smallpox Vaccination . 4 

D.P.T 32 

German Measles 59 

Mumps 23 

Tine Tuberculin 16 

Detection Programs 

Heaf Tuberculin • • -, 409 

*Tine Tuberculin Test . 284 

*A continuing program of Tine Tuberculin Testing was iniatiated this year for all 
food handlers working in Cohasset, and residents, upon request. Tine tests are 
available through our nursing staff at the Social Service League Office. 

Tuberculosis Status 

Active 



132 



Arrested Cases 5 

Cases under supervision 3 

Visits of Supervision 38 







Public 


Health Nursing 






(by 


contract wil 


:h Social Service League) 








Mrs.M 


. Medeiros, 


R.N. 




Maternity 






Admissions 


Home Visits 


Antepartum 






4 




11 


Postpartum 






74 




111 


Health Promotion 












Premature 






5 




6 


Under 28 days 






39 




46 


28 days - 1 year 






52 




107 


1 - 4 years 






68 




143 


5- 19 years 






40 




70 


Disease Control - Supervision 








Cancer 






3 




29 


Cardiac 






7 




39 


Diabetic 






4 




10 


Communicable 






50 




54 


Handicapped Children 




8 




24 


(Mental, Physical) 













There have been five premature births reported to the Board of Health. 

Communicable Diseases Reported 

Mumps 1 

Septic Sore Throat 52 

Scarlet Fever 8 

Dog Bites 37 

Hepatitis 1 

Chicken Pox 17 

Gonorrhea 2 

Well Child Conferences 

Sessions Attendance 

Well Baby, Well Child Clinics 10 1 73 

In compliance with the Advisory Boards' recommendation, the following 
fee schedule was established at the Well Child Clinic: Physical (including 
immunization) is $2.00 for first child, each addition family member $1.00, 

133 



Immunization only is $1.00. $192.00 was collected in fees and returned to the 
town. No child was denied admission to clinic for lack of fee. Attendance 
continued to show an increase. 

Since funds were not available for the mobile X-ray Unit, Mr. Vento was 
able through the Massachusetts Department of Public Health, to get Tines for 
the tuberculin skin testing of all food handlers employed in the tov/n. Testing 
was done by the nursing staff. A program of continued testing for new personnel 
will be available at the League office. 

It is a pleasure to work with a board and an agent who share with us a 
deep concern for recognizing and safeguarding the health needs of its people. 

Casework Report - Frances P. Wright, ACSW 

Four cases were carried over from 1 969 and two of these are still being 
carried as active cases for supportive treatment. Four new cases have been 
referred by the Board of Health nurses this year; a mother of young children 
with marital and financial problems, a handicapped women in need of economic 
planning and emotional support, another young family in need of budgetary 
help, and a cardiac patient in need of possible rehabilitation and psychological 
support. Two of these have been closed, the other two are still being carried. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EDWARD A. McCarthy, M.D., Chairman 

RENE G. CHIASSON, Secretary 

WILLIAM J. MONTUORL Member 



REPORT OF THE WIRE DEPARTMENT 

The following is the annual report of the wire department for the year 
1970. 

Fire Alarm & Police Signal 

New fire alarm boxes were installed at location spots to give better 
coverage in these areas. 

Old overhead fire alarm wire was removed and replaced with new wire in 
various sections of the town. New cross arms and hardware were also replaced 

134 



where needed. 

All fire alarm boxes were tested and painted. 

New parts were replaced in traffic signal equipment because of wear and 
damage. 

Town-Owned Buildings 

All repairs of electrical equipment and wiring was done by this 
department. Electrical work done by electrical contractors was carefully 
inspected and permits were filed with the Town Accountant. 

I wish to thank the honorable board of Selectmen, all town officials, and 
the men who worked with me. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Edward P. Malley 
Superintendent of Wires 

REPORT OF THE HARBOR MASTER 

I hereby submit the annual report of the Harbor Department with an eye 
to the windward in years to come. 

There has been much time spent by the Harbor Study Committee looking 
into the long range planning of the harbor. It is pretty much accepted that what 
we have for our harbor at present is about all we can ever hope for because of its 
geographical location. Specifically the areas of ledge outcrop. Upon conferring 
with the Army Engineers it is agreed that the cost of blasting would be 
prohibited for the amount of dredged area to be gained. The most we can hope 
for is maintainance dredging so we can utilize what we have. 

It must be brought to the boatowners attention that the harbor regulations 
state a boat owner cannot increase the size of his boat without approval of the 
Harbor Master. Persons in violation of this regulation have caused many 
hardships to themselves and others in the past. 

At present, there are 432 registered moorings in the harbor, returning to 
the town around five thousand dollars in mooring fees. There is also a large 
number of applications on a waiting list, hoping for a birth in the harbor. In the 
past two years it has been possible to create thirty to forty new berths by 
relocating moorings, grouping boats of the same nature together. It is the intent 
this year to try to moor smaller boats bow and stern to create more berths. It is 
felt the harbor has pretty much reached the saturation point and it is going to 

135 



take the extreme cooporation on persons using the harbor to make it more 
beneficial for all concerned and not on an individual basis. 

It should not go without saying that this past year was a year of history. 
One of the highlights was the blessing of the fishing boats held in August. This 
was a first and aroused a lot of interest from boat owners and spectators. To the 
many persons who donated their time I wish to extend thanks to them for 
making this event such a rewarding success. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Harry H. Ritter 
Harbor Master 

REPORT OF THE LIBRARIAN 

FOR THE YEAR 1970 

My first report last year, after thirteen months on the job, outlined in 
some detail what the library's program and goals were. This report will be a brief 
sequel to that one, which continues to be an accurate statement of library 
activities. 

Development and use of the Collections 

Pur- Total Circulation 

chased Gifts Withdrawn Holdings (Home Use) 

Adult Nonfiction 
Adult Fiction 
Total Adult 

Juvenile Nonfiction 
Juvenile Fiction 
Total Juvenile 

TOTAL BOOKS 36,643 

Periodicals 187 26 

Phono-records 123 6 

Art Prints 

TOTAL CIRCULATION 89,027 

Per Capita circulation (1970 population) — 13 items; about $60 worth. 

136 



1328 


42 


866 




18,602 


528 


23 


711 




28,920 


1856 


65 


1577 


25,753 


47,522 


369 


4 


43 




8,689 


777 


4 


147 




21,796 


1146 


8 


190 


10,890 


30,485 



I 





8,580 


863 


2,396 


12 


44 



Per capita cost of public library department — $8.00. 

Twenty-six percent of the books purchased this year were paperbacks. 
Most of these paperbacks were added copies of popular titles already owned in 
hardcovers. A large number of them are children's fiction. The extensive use of 
paperbacks is useful in meeting growing demands for information. It is a 
necessary development in the face of rising book prices — 10% increase last year 
alone. 

Use of magazines is up 28% and use of adult non-fiction is up 1 7% over 
last year. Use of children's books is down 11%. There is greater use among 
students of adult materials. 

INTERDEPARTMENTAL COOPERATION 

Appreciation should be expressed to the Town Accountant's office for 
generously allowing regular use of the copy machine for library business; to the 
School Department for regular loan of a projector for library film programs; and 
again to the School Department for regular monthly meetings over the past year 
between school personnel and this department to explore ways to coordinate 
and improve media services to Cohasset pubHc school students. 

PROSPECTS 

The time has come for the citizens, and the officials of the Ubrary 
department and of the school department, to begin to develop new and clear 
definitions of the responsibilities of each department for library service to the 
entire community. For many years, public libraries have been learning resource 
centers for school children, usually without much coordination or assistance 
from school authorities. In recent years, the educational estabUshment has 
decided that every school should have its own library. The educational 
philosophy behind this argument is good. I support the development of good 
media centers for children and encourage the rapid implementation of an 
educational philosophy which will take the fullest advantage of the resources 
now available, whether in the school building or elsewhere. At the same time, 
the needs of older students overlap the growing needs of adults, and the needs of 
both groups exceed the available resources of existing libraries, whether school, 
pubhc or university. How are the library resources and services needed by all 
groups to be organized? The standards for school libraries and the ability of 
school systems to get the money and the personnel they need now surpass the 
resources and standards of most small public libraries. Yet the public library 
continues to be the most accessible, and to face the demands and expectations 
of students and their parents. It is time for the two institutions to develop a 
coordinated set of goals and plan of service; but that plan must depend 
ultimately on what the people of community — children, young people, and 
adults — think they need and want in the way of library service: what do you 



137 



want, where do you want it, when do you want it, and how do you want the 
service deHvered? If you do not plan the answers to these questions, they will 
happen to you by accident. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Richard E. Hayes 
Chief Librarian 



REPORT OF THE RECREATION COMMISSION 

The Recreation Commission has now completed its 14th year of 
operation. 

On every 3rd Wednesday of each month the five Commissioners, the 
Superintendent of Grounds and Maintenance, Eustis James, the Program 
Director, Paul Merna, and an invited teenage representative, Richard Sawyer, 
meet at 8:00 P.M. at the Community Center. 

It has been our recent policy to make each meeting as interesting and 
meaningful as possible. We invited guest speakers or discussed areas that were 
pertinent to the hindrance of a successful recreation program. 

In early October, Paul Merna reported on the summer recreation program. 

The program attracted a significant amount of children (ages 5-12) in the 
first few weeks but attendance dropped noticeably in the heat of August due to 
the natural attraction of our beaches and private pools. 

Trips to the Music Circus, Aquarium, Boston Harbor Tour, etc., were 
highly successful. 

Many of the children that attend every day are those that are searching for 
activity, friends or an image to model themselves after. 

Other meetings involved communication between our Commission and 
Mrs. Cline, Chairman of the Committee for the Aged. 

Meetings with the Conservation Commission dealt with the responsibilities 
of the new Tree and Parks Department which will take over the duties of field 
maintenance formerly held by the Recreation Department. 



138 



Projects were severely limited by a meager and exhausted budget. 
Suggestions and complaints are appreciated, since this is one way to be alerted to 
the needs of our youth. 

Meetings with the Cormnittee on Drugs to make sure, that new programs 
wouldn't overlap. 

A floodlight installation was erected on the Joseph Osgood playground for 
the purpose of a night basketball program. This project will be completed by 
April, 1971 for use this summer. 

An effort to maintain and clear the skating areas of Cohasset is desperately 
needed if money is allotted. 

If the child feels he is worth something by developing his self-image and 
his interest in his immediate surroundings he could ignore the lure of drugs. 

Let us give our youth the assistance they need. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Dennis W. Kuntz, Chairman 

Hamilton Tewksbury 

William O'Brien 

Patrick McCarthy 

Robert Pennington 



REPORT OF THE COLLECTOR OF TAXES 
January 1, 1970 to December 31, 1970 

1966 

Outstanding January 1, 1970 118.93 

Collected and Paid to Treasurer 60. 1 3 

Abated 34.65 

Outstanding December 31, 1970 24.15 

11 8.9 3 



1967 

Outstanding January 1, 1970 279.35 

Collected and Paid to Treasurer 2 1 0. 35 

Outstanding December 31, 1970 69.00 

279.35 



1968 

Outstanding January 1, 1970 10,480.32 

Collected and Paid to Treasurer 9,1 87.96 

Abated 403.16 



139 



Tax Titles 




296.40 




Outstanding December 31, 1970 


1969 


592.80 


10,480.32 


Outstanding January 1, 1970 






105,890.81 


Add: New Committments 






32,320.81 
138,211.62 


Collected and Paid to Treasurer 




117,760.19 




Abated 


13,760.54 






Refunds on abatements 


5,162.60 


8,597.94 




Tax Titles 




223.58 




Outstanding December 31, 1970 




11,629.91 


138,211.62 



1970 

Total Committments of Warrants from the Assessors 
of Personal Property, Real Estate & Motor Vehicle 
Excise: 



3,307,133.37 



Collected and Paid to Treasurer 

Abated 

Refunds on abatements 

Tax Titles 

Outstanding, December 31, 1970 



112,195.15 
21,995.35 



3,057,952.92 



90,199.80 

5,775.09 
153,205.56 



REPORT OF THE WATER COLLECTOR 

December 31, 1970 



3,307,133.37 





1968 Water Liens 






Outstanding January 1, 1970 






72.00 


Collected and Paid to Treasurer 


1969 Water Liens 


72.00 


72.00 


Outstanding January 1, 1970 






1,303.63 


Collected and Paid to Treasurer 




998.06 




Tax Titles 




None 




Outstanding December 31, 1970 


1970 Water Liens 


305.57 


1,303.63 


Total Committment of Warrant 






11,038.88 


Collected and Paid to Treasurer 




9,414.54 




Tax Titles 




81.40 




Outstanding December 31, 1970 




1,542.94 


11,038.88 



140 



1969 Water Meters, etc. 



Outstanding January 1, 1970 






21,626.61 


New Committments 






476.22 
22,102.83 


Collected and Paid to Treasurer 




11,058.81 




Abated 




5.14 




Transfer to 1970 Water Liens 


1970 Water Meters, etc. 


11,038.88 


22,102.83 


Total Committment of Warrants: 






154,065.72 


Collected and Paid to Treasurer 




134,189.39 




Abated 


389.77 






Refunds 


572.42 


182.65 




Outstanding 




20,058.98 


154,065.72 



REPORT OF THE TOWN COLLECTOR 

December 31, 1970 



Accounts Receivable Collected 

Town Hall 

Harbor Mooring Fees 

Board of Health 

Wire Department 

Police Dept. Ambulance fees 

School Department 

Misc. Income 

Cemetery Sales 





16,538.93 


210.00 




4,939.50 




100.00 




264.10 




1,455.00 




539.73 




4,620.10 




4,410.50 






16,538.93 



TOTAL COLLECTIONS SUMMARY 



Taxes Collected 

Water Collections 

Accounts Receivable 

Interest 

Lien Certificates 

Water Liens 



3,185,171.55 

145,248.20 

16,538.93 

6,521.96 

373.18 

10,484.60 



Total 



3.364,338.42 



Respectfully submitted, 

Gordon E. Flint 
Town Collector 



141 



REPORT OF THE TOWN TREASURER 

JANUARY 1, 1970 TO DECEMBER 31, 1970 

BALANCE IN TREASURY - JANUARY 1 , 1 970 $ 301 ,580. 14 

Received from Collector of Taxes 3,347,799.29 

Received from Town Collector 16,538.93 

Received from Other Sources 3,046,512.27 



$6,712,430.63 
Paid Selectmen's Warrants No. 1 - 194 Inc. - 6,318,856.07 



BALANCE IN TREASURY - DECEMBER 3 1 , 1 970 $ 393,574.56 



Rockland Trust Company $ 42, 1 84. 1 6 

State Street Bank and Trust Company 54,017.18 

South Shore National Bank 142,977.27 

New England Merchants Bank 35,897.72 

Boston Safe Deposit and Trust Company 37,341.96 

Norfolk County Trust Company 50,746.23 

First National Bank of Boston 30,3 1 0.04 

Cash in Drawer 100.00 

$ 393,574.56 



Respectfully submitted, 
David E. Truesdell 
Treasurer 



REPORT OF THE TOWN ACCOUNTANT 

To the Board of Selectmen and the citizens of the Town of Cohasset: 

Submitted herewith is the Town Accountant's Annual Report in accor- 
dance with Section 61 of Chapter 41 of the General Laws of Massachusetts, 
for the year ending December 31, 1970. 

(1) Detailed statement of receipts and expenditures 

(2) Trust funds in custody of Treasurer 

(3) Statement of Town Debt and maturity schedules for same 

(4) Summary of appropriations and other accounts 

(5) Balance Sheet - December 3 1 , 1 970, General Accounts 

Respectfully submitted, 

WILLIAM S. SIGNORELLI 
Town Accountant 



142 



Current Year: 
Personal 
Real Estate 
Recovery of Taxes 

Previous Years: 
Personal 
Real Estate 



State 



RECEIPTS 






General Revenue 






TAXES 








$ 160,409.18 

2,688,003.89 

1,779.00 


$2,850,192.07 




977.36 
90,788.81 


91,766.17 



From State: 

Valuation Basis 

Tax Title Redemptions 
Total Taxes 



57,232.33 

10,298.66 
3,009,489.23 



LICENSES AND PERMITS 



Alcoholic Beverages 

To Carry Fire Arms 

Common Victualer 

Week Day and Sunday Amusement 

Food Service 

Selling Motor Vehicles Class No. 1 

Selling Motor Vehicles Class No. 2 

Sewerage Disposal 

Plumbing 

Building 

Gasoline Registrations 

Clam Digging 

Disposal Works Installer 

Transport Offal and Rubbish 

Mooring Permits 

Firearms Identification Cards 

All Other - Miscellaneous 

Swimming Pools 

Retail Food 

Drain Layers License - Sewer Dept. 

Gas Inspections 

Wire Department 

Total Licenses and Permits 



4,175.00 
133.00 
105.00 
337.00 

65.00 
100.00 

60.00 
183.00 
343.00 
1,067.50 
272.50 
505.00 
114.00 

55.00 
4,939.50 

89.00 
178.50 
100.00 

25.00 

50.00 
188.00 
442.50 



13.527.50 



FINES 



Court Fines 



439.80 



GRANTS AND GIFTS 

Grants: 

From Federal Government: 

Police Teleprocessing Terminals 695.00 



143 



School: 






Lunches 


12,094.75 




Public Law No. 85-864 Title III 535.20 




Public Law No. 874 


11,910.00 




Public Law No. 89-10 


16,131.00 




Public Law No. 85-864 Title V 


772.65 




Public Law No. 89-10 Title II 


1,458.03 


43,596.63 


3m County: 






Dog Licenses 




835.28 


)m State: 






Schools: 






Construction 


65,169.65 




Transportation - Chapter 71 


41,090.74 




Chapter 506 Acts of 1966 






(Schools) 


17,622.12 




Chapter 70 


154,289.55 




Regional School District - 






Chap. 71 


20,159.00 




Special Education Programs: 






Chapter 69 and 71 


33,265.00 




Outside School Transportations: 




Chapter 74 


993.00 




Lunches 


11,945.97 




Tuition & Transportation - 






Chapter 76 


500.59 




Highways: 






Chapter 768, Acts of 1969 - 






Sec. 5 


23,045.28 




Chapter 768, Acts of 1969 - 






Sec. 4 


7,681.76 




Other: 






Shellfish Propagation 


600.00 




Library Aid 


1,460.00 




Council for Aging 


350.00 


378,172.66 



Gifts: 

Beechwood Cemetery Association, 

Chapter 370, Acts of 1952 2,218.66 

Directors of Paul Pratt Memorial 

Library, Chapter 36 1 , Acts of 1 97 3,839.48 6,058.14 

Total Grants and Gifts 428,662.7 1 



TOTAL GENERAL REVENUE 3,452, 1 1 9.24 



COMMERCIAL REVENUE 
Privileges: 

1 966 Motor Vehicle and Trailer Excise 60. 1 3 

1967 Motoi Vehicle and Trailer Excise 141.35 

1968 Motor Vehicle and Trailer Excise 160.33 

1969 Motor Vehicle and Trailer Excise 35,090.65 



144 



1970 Motor Vehicle and Trailer Excise 209,538.85 

Total Commercial Revenue 244,99 1.31 

DEPARTMENTAL REVENUE 

Town Collector: 

Lien Certificates 373.20 

Police Department: 

Ambulance Service 1,455.00 

Restitution 58.00 

Insurance Recovery - Motor Vehicle 113.91 1,626.91 

Sealer of Weights and Measures - Fees 192.75 

Library - Fines, etc. 1,213.27 

Wire Department: 

233.10 



292.00 



Recovery for Damage to Traffic Lights 




Board of Health: 




WeU Baby Clinic 


192.00 


Sale of Gravely Tractor 


100.00 


Civil Defense - Sale of Tank Retriever 




Highways: 




Joint Maintenance - County 


4,000.00 


Joint Maintenance - State 


4,000.00 


Chap. 90 Construction - 




State Forest Avenue 


6,244.91 


Veterans' Services - Reimbursement from 




State 




Schools: 




Lunches 


60,320.37 


Rentals 


325.82 


Athletic Receipts 


3,059.47 



50.00 

14,244.91 
5,318.90 



Evening School - Adults 1,475.00 65,180.66 

Total Departmental Revenue 88,725.70 

UNCLASSIFIED REVENUE 

Unclassified: 

North Cohasset Post Office Building - Rent 
Government Island Real Estate - Rent 
Town Hall: 

Rent of Hall 

Rent Office Space - State Welfare Dept. 
Sale of Town Maps, Histories, etc. 
Sale of Street Lists 

Total Unclassified Revenue 4,869.98 

WATER DEPARTMENT 

1968 Water Liens 72.00 

1969 Water Liens 998.06 

1970 Water Liens 9,414.54 

1969 Water Meters 10,584.12 

1970 Water Meters 109,187.36 



145 



1,620.00 


1,920.00 


210.00 


300.00 


626.98 


193.00 



1970 Water Services 




1,210.00 




1969 Water Miscellaneous 




474.69 




1970 Water Miscellaneous 




1,892.03 




Hydrant Services 1970 




21,900.00 




Tax Title Redemptions - Water Liens 




179.83 




Total Water Receipts 


CEMETERIES 




155,912.63 



Sale of Lots and Graves 1,993.50 



Taxes: 




On Deferred Taxes 


6,367.16 


Tax Titles Redeemed 


524.46 


Motor Vehicle Excises 


155.80 


Trust Funds: 




Wheelwright Park 


787.52 


Wadleigh Park 


262.52 


BiUings-Pratt Park Fund 


52.52 


Robert Charles Billings - Town Common 60.36 


Cohasset Free Public Library - Trust Funds 




Cemeteries: - Perpetual Care 




Woodside 


2,308.36 


Beechwood 


370.34 


Charles A. Perkins Cemetery _ 


400.00 



7,047.42 

1,162.92 
1,863.01 

3,078.70 



Totallnterest 13,152.05 

MUNICIPAL INDEBTEDNESS 

Temporary Loans: 

Anticipation of Revenue 1,600,000.00 

Anticipation of Highway Reim- 
bursements 4,000.00 
Anticipation of Serial Issue 131,000.00 1,735,000.00 

Debt Loans: 

Serial Issue - Land for Schools 1 3 1 ,000.00 

Premium on serial issue 284.27 131,284.27 



Total 1,866,284.27 

AGENCIES - TRUSTS - INVESTMENTS 

Agencies: 

Dog Licenses due County 1,772.50 

Federal Withholding Tax Deductions 327,376.86 

State Withholding Tax Deductions 62,726.0 1 

Retirement Deductions County 39,437.14 

Teachers' Annuity Deductions 7,490.00 

Teachers' State Retirement Deductions 62,707.83 

Teachers' Dues Deductions 2,860.00 



146 



Blue Cross - Blue Shield 37,119.66 

Life Insurance 2,632.49 

Tailings 381.97 
Trusts: 

Woodside Cemetery Perpetual Care 2,675.00 

James W. Nichols Schools Prize Fund - Transfer 50.00 

War Memorial Fund - Transfer 1,330.33 

Major WiUiam Arthur Scholarship Fund - Transfer 500.00 

Conservation Commission - Transfer 1,444.00 



Total 



550,503.79 



REFUNDS AND ADJUSTMENTS 



Various Departments: 






Sewer 


7.00 




Schools: 






Out of State Travel 1 74.2 1 






Athletic Revolving Fund 20.00 






General Maintenance 280.39 






Vocational Education 6.00 






Lunches - Revolving 30.00 


510.60 




Highway 


34.70 




Wire 


66.00 




Recreation 


12.22 




Assessors 


2.18 




Fire - Wages $67.20, Out of State Travel $18.65 


85.85 




Tax Collector - Petty Cash 


50.00 




Interest 


122.58 




1970 Motor Vehicle Excise 


66.55 




Accrued Interest - Land acquisition bonds 


837.31 




Blue Cross - Blue Shield - Dividends Prior Years 


3,494.00 




Blue Cross - Blue Shield - Other 


315.93 




Cancellation of Fire Insurance Policies - Town 


7,284.02 




Cancellation of Fire Insurance Policies - Water 


214.08 




Adjustments: 






Blue Cross - Blue Shield 


2,305.78 




Federal Withholding Taxes 


15,099.22 




Life Insurance 


156.17 




Teachers' Annuities 


298.50 




State Withholding Taxes 


785.64 




Payroll - Exchange 


432.79 




Teachers' Retirement 


116.90 




Total Refunds and Adjustments 




32,298.02 


TOTAL RECEIPTS 




6,410,850.49 



147 



EXPENDITURES 



Moderator - Salary 



150.00 



Advisory Committee 
Clerical Services 
Expenses: 

Stationery and Postage 
Dues 



70.00 
35.00 



500.00 



105.00 



605.00 



Planning Board 

Clerical Assistance 
Expenses: 

Printing, Stationery, Postage 



400.00 
132.60 



532.60 



Zoning Board of Appeals 
Expenses: 
Advertising 
Office Expenses 

Zoning By-Law Committee 
Advertising 
Printing By-Law Booklets 



280.90 
82.36 



70.40 
253.00 



363.26 



323.40 



Personnel Committee 






Expenses 






Clerical Assistance 




50.00 


Dues 




20.00 


Professional Bargaining Advisor 




1,262.50 


Conservation Committee 






Expenses: 






Dues 




50.00 


Miscellaneous 




14.30 


Selectmen 






Salaries: 






Chairman 


1,100.00 




1 Member 


1,000.00 




1 Member 


1,000.00 


3,100.00 


Office Salaries 




6,326.50 


Expenses: 






Stationery and Postage 


354.11 




Printing and Advertising 


99.77 




Telephone 


428.73 




Dues 


111.00 




Typewriter Maintenance 


11.75 




Gas Permits 


188.00 




Travel 


27.30 


1,220.66 


Town Accountant 






Salary of Town Accountant 




10,607.00 


Office Salaries 




8,620.23 


Expenses: 






Stationery and Postage 


248.85 





1,332.50 



64.30 



10,647.16 



148 



Telephone 238.01 

Travel Expenses 210.90 

Dues 27.00 

Maintenance of Machines 137.40 

Binding Ledgers 75.00 

Supplements to Annotated Laws 102.50 

Capital Outlay: Typewriter 

(1) IBM SelectricNo. 9210411 less 
trade in 
Rental of Xerox Copier: 



Capital Outlay: 

(1) Remington Typewriter No.705995 
less trade in 



1,039.66 



425.00 



Rent 


714.06 




Supplies 


19.60 


733.66 


wn Treasurer 






Salary of Town Treasurer 




8,144.00 


Office Salaries 




5,691.00 


Expenses: 






Stationery, Postage Office Expenses 


1,127.31 




Travel Expenses 


115.86 




Telephone 


214.19 




Maintenance of Machines 


252.00 




Dues 


29.00 




Certification of Notes 


85.00 


1,823.36 



21,425.55 



385.00 16,043.36 



Town Collector 

Salary of Town Collector 7,634.00 

Office Salaries 

Deputy Collector 125.00 

Clerks 2,042.30 2,167.30 

Expenses: 

Stationery, Postage and Office Supplies 667.37 

Printing and Advertising 242.83 

Telephone 177.47 

Travel Expenses 11.00 

Petty Cash 50.00 

Maintenance of Machines 68.00 

Dues 6.00 

Tax Title Takings 28.00 1,250.67 



11,051.97 



Assessors 
Salaries: 

Chairman 

1 Member 

1 Member 
Office Salaries 
Expenses: 

Stationery, Postage and Office Expenses 

Telephone 

Photostatic copies of real estate 
transfers 

Travel Expenses 

Posting Notices 



1.300.00 
1,200.00 
1,200.00 



458.40 
165.12 

107.72 
30.26 
11.00 



3,700.00 
9,091.98 



149 



Dues 36.00 




Banker & Tradesman 42.00 




Maintenance of Machines 1 14.00 




Re-valuation Contract ($21,300.00) 20,235.00 




Assessors' Plats 1,507.92 




Transfer of Deeds to Plans 774.00 


23,481.42 


Capital Outlay: 




(1) Olympia Typewriter No.7-2218136 


237.90 


Law & Legal Counsel 




Salary of Town Counsel 


5,000.00 


Expense - Telephone Allowance 


36.00 


Town Clerk 




Salary of Town Clerk 


2,345.00 


Office Salaries 


3,775.26 


Expenses: 




Recording Fees - Birth, Deaths, Marriages 506.00 




Administering Oaths 62.75 




Stationery, Postage & Office Expenses 106.45 




Telephone 189.68 




Travel Expenses 222.08 




Dues 37.00 




Typewriter Maintenance 8.50 


1,132.46 



36,511.30 



5,036.00 



7,252.72 



Elections, Registrations and Town Meetings 
Salaries and Wages: 

Election Officers 2,528.14 

Registrars 912.00 

Janitor Services 341.69 

Clerical Services 2,091.60 5,873.43 

Expenses: 

Stationery, Postage & Office Expenses 398.94 

Printing and Advertising: 
Warrants for Town 
Meeting 1,734.50 

Voting Lists 531.00 

Street Lists 380.00 

BaUots 172.00 

Other 197.00 3,014.50 

Meals 349.49 

Transporting Election Materials 60.00 

Rental of Chairs 264.00 

Posting Notices 116.00 

Maintenance of Duplicator Machine 20.00 

Travel 25.00 

(1) Olivetti Adding Machine No.55081 

less trade in of Clary No.242518 92.00 

Microphone for Moderator 71.40 

Repairs to voting booths 25.00 4,436.33 



10,309.76 



Town Hall 

Salary and Wages: 
Custodian 
Extra Janitor Services 



7,690.00 
220.07 



7,910.07 



150 



Expenses: 




Fuel 


1,373.71 


Electric Services 


860.28 


Janitor Supplies 


418.26 


Repairs 


854.05 


Rubbish Services 


118.00 


Special Hall License 


25.00 


Telephone Allowance 


36.00 3,685.30 


Capital Outlay: 




Gas Incinerator 


200.00 


Work Required by State Building 




Inspector 


600.00 800.00 


lice Department 




Salaries: 




Chief 


11,127.00 


Lieutenant 


9,982.60 


2 Sergeants 


18,507.13 


Regular Patrolmen 


93,729.20 


Intermittent Patrolmen 


851.74 


Night Shift Premium 


4,244.31 


Overtime 


16,747.46 


Paid Holidays 


5,299.24 


Detective Services 


425.58 


Harbor Patrol 


430.48 161,344.74 


Expenses: 




Equipment Maintenance: 




Equipment for Men 


1,677.79 


Radio Maintenance 


382.30 


IBM Teletype Service 


1,418.79 


Laundry 


384.95 


Maintenance of Building and Grounds: 




Repairs 


19.72 


Janitor Supplies 


174.08 


Janitor Services 


864.00 


Rubbish Services 


60.00 


Printing, Postage, Office Expenses 


518.66 


Telephones 


1,375.61 


Chiefs Expenses 


89.50 


Ammunition 


115.44 


Dues 


10.00 


Care of Prisoners 


102.25 


Advance Training 


153.70 


Camera Supplies 


63.69 


Annotated Law Supplement 


8.00 


Maintenance of Motor Vehicles: 




Repairs and Maintenance 


1,757.51 


Tires and tubes 


526.61 


Gasoline and Oil 


3.362.76 13,065.36 



Capital Outlay: 

(2) 1970 Ford Custom Ranch Wagons 

less trade in of (2) 1968 Fords 5,398.00 

Lettering, Radio Changeover and 

advertising 222.10 

Equipment for Ranch Wagons 288.00 



12,395.37 



5,908.10 



151 



Article 22, March 1970: 

Speed Detecting Equipment 2,255.00 182,573.20 



Fire Department 






Salaries and Wages: 






Chief 


11,127.00 




Deputy Chief 


10,081.00 




2 Captains 


18,594.00 




Firefighters 


118,624.81 




Call Men 


6,875.00 




Casual Labor 


1,779.42 




Paid Holidays 


6,093.32 




Overtime 


4,100.48 


177,275.03 


Expenses: 






Equipment: 






To Carry on Apparatus 


732.70 




Hose 


1,498.40 




Equipment for Men 


447.70 




Radio Maintenance 


272.25 




Other Equipment and Repairs 


822.27 




Stations 


500.78 




Maintenance of Trucks and Chiefs Car 






GasoHne and Oil 


751.34 




Tires and Tubes 


386.06 




Repairs and Maintenance 


4,257.37 




Fuel 


519.42 




Lights 


458.68 




Maintenance of Buildings and Grounds: 






Repairs-Painting 






Beechwood 






Station 900.00 






Other 343.70 


1,243.70 




House and Janitor Supplies 


414.31 




Laundry 


172.65 




Refuse Collections 


120.00 




Printing, Postage, Stationery 


42.68 




Telephone 


1,138.07 




Dues 


81.00 




Firemen's Injuries and Examinations 


57.00 




Fire Prevention Education 


99.21 


14,015.59 


Out of State Travel 




127.30 


Capital Outlay: 






(1) Akron Chrome 491 Deck Gun 




605.00 192,022.92 


Police & Fire Headquarters Maintenance 






Expenses: 






Fuel 




2,658.45 


Electric Services 




1,068.69 


Maintenance of Buildings and Grounds 




531.32 4,258.46 


Hydrant Services 




24,816.00 


Unpaid BiU - Article 46, March 1970 




133.65 24,949.65 



1 



Article 43, 1969 - Connecting Fire & Police Bldg. to 

Municipal Sewer Line 1,325.00 



152 



Branch Sewer Line to Fire and Police Bldg. Construction 



248.40 



1,573.40 



Wire Department 








Salaries and Wages: 








Salary of Superintendent 


9,297.00 






Wages 


9,177.93 


18,474.93 




Expenses: 








Dues 


15.50 






Supplies and Equipment 


3,208.09 






Maintenance of Truck: 








Gasoline and Oil 215.11 








Repairs 185.88 


400.99 






Telephone Allowance 


36.00 






Automobile Allowance 


400.00 






Radio Maintenance 


26.95 


4,087.53 




Out of State Travel 




150.00 


22,712.46 


Sealing of Weights and Measures 








Salary of Sealer 




487.00 




Expenses: 








Travel Expenses 


10.16 






Equipment and Supplies 


11.86 






Telephone 


12.98 






Oil Truck Testing 


15.00 


50.00 


537.00 


Insect Pest Extermination - Moth Suppresion 








Salary and Wages: 








Superintendent's Salary 




500.00 




Wages 




6,410.45 




Expenses: 








Stationery, postage 


9.40 






Insecticides 


1,842.46 






Supplies and Tools 


166.16 






Electric Services 


13.78 






Advertising 


14.70 






Maintenance of Trucks: 








Gas and Oil 


81.75 






Repairs 


56.25 






Rental of Garage 


140.00 






Private Contractors 


7,170.50 


9,495.00 




Tree Department 








Salary and Wages: 








Tree Warden (Salary Waived) 




— 




Wages 




8,208.97 




Expenses: 








Private Contractors 


800.00 






Hardware and Tools 


120.57 






Maintenance of Trucks: 








Gas and Oil 


165.75 






Repairs 


318.83 






Rental of Garage 


140.00 






Trees 


136.02 






Roadside Mowing 


760.00 






Dues and Subscriptions 


5.00 







53 



Equipment Repairs 



28.68 



2,474.85 



27,089.27 



Civil Defense 
Salaries: 



Director 




310.50 




Deputy Director 




150.00 




Expenses: 








Telephone 


157.03 






Electric Services-Air Raid Alarms 


90.00 






Remote Control-Air Raid Alarms 


186.00 






Maintenance of Mobile Equipment 


43.00 






Supplies and Equipment 


65.75 


541.78 


1,002.28 


Shellfish Constable - Salary 






200.00 


Building Inspector 








Salary 




1,666.65 




Expenses: 








Office Supplies and Expenses 


45.03 






Telephone 


54.28 






Travel Expenses 


7.36 


106.67 


1,773.32 


Board of Health 








Salary - Health Agent 




8,539.00 




Expenses: 








Stationery, printing, Postage 


253.70 






Storing Serum 


50.00 






Well Baby Clinic - Professional Services 


500.00 






Laboratory Tests 


232.00 






Dues and Meetings 


272.42 






Telephone 


267.21 






Travel Allowance 


560.00 






Plumbing Inspector Fees 


328.00 






Medical and Chnical Supplies 


57.75 






Signs 


56.00 


2,577.08 




District/Public Nurse or Other Nurses and 








Nursing Services Social Service League of 








Cohasset, Inc. 




6,000.00 




Inspector of Animals and Slaughtering 








Salary of Inspector 




277.00 





Refuse and Garbage Disposal - Town Disposal Area 

Salary and Wages 11,033.61 
Expenses: 

Equipment and Supplies 264.69 

Electricity 87.70 

Bulldozing and Gravel 4,733.21 

Burying Animals 158.00 

Control of Rats 260.00 

Moving Building to Disposal Area 50.00 5,553.60 



Eradication of Mosquitoes 
Expenses: 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
State Reclamation Board 



1,450.00 



154 



Mosquito Control Project 
Expenses: 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
State Reclamation Board 
Control of Insect Life - Straits Pond 
Expenses; 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
State Reclamation Board 



4,700.00 



1,435.00 



Sewer Department 
Salary and Wages: 



Superintendent 


1,065.00 






Clerical 


319.50 






Wages 


6,287.97 


7,672.47 




Expenses: 








Dues and Subscriptions 


39.00 






Telephone 


96.00 






Office Supplies and Expenses 


124.73 






Printing and Advertising 


600.00 






Travel Expenses 


7.97 






Plant Operation: 








Chemicals, etc. 


1,781.69 






Repairs and Maintenance 


669.16 






Supplies 


70.70 






Electricity 


1,597.48 


4,986.73 




Capital Outlay: 








Electric Water Heater 


98.45 






(3) Fire Extinguishers 


75.00 






Testing Equipment 


1,069.19 






Booster Hose 


168.00 


1,410.64 


55,635.13 


Sewer Construction - From Bond Issue 








Contractor 




13,167.60 




Sewer Construction-From State Grant 








Contractor 


19,533.88 






Engineering 


9,035.00 






Land Rent 


20.00 






Land Easement 


450.00 






Land Appraisal 


75.00 






Land Taking 


4,000.00 


33,113.88 


46,281.48 


Highway Department 








Salary and Wages 








Surveyor 


8,605.00 






Wages 


43,497.35 


52,102.35 




Expenses: 








Telephone 


239.10 






Material and Supplies 


18,916.85 






Maintenance of Trucks and Equipment: 








Gasoline and Oil 


2,215.70 






Repairs and Maintenance 


4,192.25 






Street Signs and Repairs 


1,959.84 






Dues 


15.00 






Street Painting 


2,173.00 







155 



Rental of Equipment 


3,147.00 


Police Details 


381.12 


Advertising 


6.40 


Repairs to Sea Walls - Contractor 


712.75 


Storm Gear for Men 


69.00 


Capital Outlay: 




(1) 1971 Ford Truck less Trade-in 




1960 Ford 


8,275.00 


Advertising 


22.05 


Chapter 616 Acts of 1967 - South Main Street 


Expenses: 




Materials 


4,241.56 


Contractor 


8,460.13 


Chapter 768 Acts of 1969 - Summer Street 




Contractor 




Chapter 90 Maintenance - Jerusalem Road 




Contractor 




Chapter 90 Construction - Forest Avenue 




Material 


586.00 


Contractor 


6,902.29 



34,028.01 

8,297.05 

12,701.69 
7,681.76 
6,000.00 

7,488.29 

Reconstructing and Resurfacing Sidewalks 

Article 17, 1970 - Materials 1,500.00 



Snow and Ice Removal, Sanding Streets 




Expenses: 




Wages 5,386.86 




Rental of Equipment 1 1 ,483.00 




Tools and Equipment 1,212.67 




Sand 2,080.00 




Rock Salt 11,365.98 




Maintenance of Trucks & Equipment 




Repairs and Maintenance 3,668.62 




Gasoline and Oil 214.20 


35,411.33 


Street Lighting and Beacons 


18,427.89 



Municipal Garage 




Expenses: 




Fuel 


820.24 


Electricity 


120.25 


Clearance of Brooks & Streams - Article 25, 


1969 


Contractors 


1,924.00 


Materials 


570.48 


Harbor Department 




Salary and Wages: 




Harbor Master 


7,690.00 


Assistant Harbor Master 


100.00 


Wages 


1,586.10 


Expenses: 




Equipment and Supplies 


556.28 


Wharf and Float Repairs 


510.10 


New Roof on Pavillion 


250.00 


Electricity 


55.27 



940.49 



2,494.48 187,073.34 



9,376.10 



156 



Maintenance of Boat & Equipment 


334.62 


Signs 


79.00 


Office Supplies and Expenses 


120.36 


Telephone 


140.46 


Dues 


20.00 


Uniforms 


44.00 


Capital Outlay: 




Resurface Pier at Gov't Island 


1,400.00 


(2) Floats 


750.00 


Extend and resurface ramp-Parker 




Avenue 


1 ,000.00 


Johnson 1970 25 h.p. Engine with 




trade-in of 1967 33 h.p. Evinrude 


327.00 



2,110.09 



3,477.00 



14,963.19 



Public Welfare from Federal Grants: 
Medical Assistance 



65.00 



Veterans' Services: 






Administration 






Salary 


830.00 




Office Salary 


830.00 


1,660.00 


Expenses: 






Office supplies and expenses 


52.68 




Dues 


25.00 


77.68 


Assistance: 






Cash Grants to Individuals 


10,309.50 




Groceries and Provisions 


216.95 




Medicine and Medical Care 


249.20 




Blue Cross -Blue Shield 


232.30 


11,007.95 


Schools - General Maintenance 






Expenses: 






Administrations 






School Committee 






Contracted Services 


2,180.00 




Supplies & Materials 


62.04 




Other Expenses 


2,012.06 




Superintendent's Office 






Professional Salaries 


24,850.05 




Clerical Salaries 


18,186.92 




Contracted Services 


1,083.21 




Supplies & Materials 


1,759.12 




Other Expenses 


593.25 


50,726.65 


Instructional 






Supervision 






Professional Salaries 


43,009.34 




Clerical Salaries 


3,148.82 




Other Expenses 


434.64 




Principals 






Professional Salaries 


65,518.92 




Clerical Salaries 


26,269.01 




Contracted Services 


8,165.64 




Supplies & Materials 


2,979.32 




Other Expenses 


2,018.99 




Teaching 







12,745.63 



157 



Professional Salaries 


1,084,180.55 


Other Salaries 


11,189.66 


Contracted Services 


2,119.72 


Supplies & Materials 


36,127.38 


Other Expenses 


2,199.18 


Textbooks 




Contracted Services 


419.40 


Supplies & Materials 


13,999.65 


Library Services 




Professional Salaries 


23,324.14 


Clerical Salaries 


5,286.95 


Contracted Services 


299.21 


Supplies & Materials 


8,107.97 


Other Expenses 


69.75 


Audio Visual Services 




Professional Salaries 


3,092.85 


Supplies & Materials 


4,866.66 


Other Expenses 


705.17 


Guidance 




Professional Salaries 


34,019.32 


Clerical Salaries 


5,688.34 


Contracted Services 


2,155.78 


Supphes & Materials 


1,519.39 


Other Expenses 


1,392.15 


Psychological Services 




Contracted Services 


1,749.96 1,394,057.86 


Other School Services 




Attendance Services 




Other Salaries 


650.00 


Health Services 




Professional Salaries 


16,408.42 


Supphes & Materials 


627.23 


Other Expenses 


309.29 


Pupil Transportation 




Operation of Buses - Salaries 


18,679.63 


Supplies & Materials 


2,880.36 


Other 


152.50 


Maintenance of Buses 




Contracted Services 


8,960.38 


Supphes & Materials 


2,230.29 


Contract Carriers 




Contracted Services 


25,493.60 


Athletics 




Professional Salaries 


23,586.40 


Other Salaries 


4,114.30 


Contracted Services 


5,527.05 


Supplies & Materials 


13,924.69 


Other Expenses 


4,191.19 


Student Activities 




Professional Salaries 


2,642.14 


Other Salaries 


26.07 


Contracted Services 


94.93 


Supplies & Materials 


1,666.38 


Other Expenses 


161.76 132,326.61 



158 



Plant Operation and Maintenance 
Operation of Plant 

Salaries & Services 93,731.72 

Contracted Services 294.00 

SuppUes& Materials 7,222.99 

Heat 

Supplies & Materials 13,777.99 

Utilities 

Electricity & Telephones 
Plant Maintenance 
Grounds- Salaries 
Contracted Services 
Supplies & Materials 
Other Expenses 
Maintenance of Buildings 
Other Salaries 
Contracted Services 
Supplies & Materials 
Maintenance of Equipment 
Contracted Services 
Supplies & Materials 
Fixed Charges 

Rental of Facihties 
Contracted Services 
Other Salaries 
Other Expenses 
Acquisition of Fixed Assets 
Renovations 
Other Salaries 
Contracted Services 
Acquisition of Equipment 

Equipment 
Replacement of Equipment 

Equipment 
Outgoing Transfer Account 

School Districts in Massachusetts 

Transfer 347.^7 

Other than Public Schools 

Transfer 1,710.00 2,057.67 

Total General Maintanance Expenditures 

Adult Education Program 
Professional Salaries 
Other Salaries 
Refunds 

Athletic Revolving Account 

Contracted Services 1,618.59 

Chapter 506 (Metco) 

Professional Salaries 216.00 

Contracted Services 8,364.28 

Supplies 4,873.73 

Other Expenses 2,206.49 15,660.50 

Out of State Travel 

Travel Expenses 2,131.00 



159 



21,705.63 




1,616.65 

2,500.38 

433.27 

10.00 




1,079.88 

23,587.39 

8,572.87 




4,023.30 
370.70 


178,926.77 


600.00 

333.96 

3,740.40 


4,674.36 


1,561.50 

342.77 




22,278.63 




3,648.98 


27,831.88 





1,790,601.80 


560.00 




180.19 




164.00 


904.19 



p. L. No. 89-10 Title I 

Professional Salaries 9,464.43 

Other Salaries 200.00 

Other Expenses 1,496.06 11,160.49 

P. L. No. 89-10 Title II 

Library Books 1,431.84 

P. L. No. 864 Title III 

Audio Visual Supplies 2,539.16 

Equipment 1,129.31 3,668.47 

Vocational 

Tuition 993.70 

Transportation 439.20 1,432.90 

South Shore Regional School District - Assessment 20,350.00 

Lunch Program 

Salaries and Wages 40,438.27 

Food Purchases 58,404.59 

Supphes 2,760.81 

Fuel -Gas 1,169.44 

Repairs 153.40 

Equipment 1,420.00 

Utensils, glassware and china 619.75 

Miscellaneous 49.14 64,577.13 105,015.40 

Construction - Addition to Junior-Senior High School 

Engineering 204.80 

Equipment 194.47 

Advertising 23.44 

Legal 28.06 

Site Work: 

Baseball and Softball Backstops 1,333.00 

(2) Diamonds 945.00 

Stone with commerative plaque 

"Lillard Field" 422.60 

Landscaping 795.20 3,495.80 3,946.57 

School Facilities Committee - Article 47, 1969 

Appraisal 78.91 

Surveying 100.00 

Engineering 166.63 345.54 

Acquisition of Land off Sohier Street - Article 7, Dec. 3, 1969 

Appraisal 121.09 

Engineering - Survey and Plan 1,550.00 

Legal 48.06 

Acquisition of land by purchase or eminent domain 135,000.00 136,719.15 

Walkway to Deer Hill School - Article 41, March 1, 1970 

Rental of Equipment 615.00 

Materials 2,385.00 

Labor by Highway Department — 3,000.00 

Installation of Traffic Control Devices - Deer Hill and High School 
Article 26, March 10, 1970 

Advertising 12.25 



160 



Libraries 

Salaries & Wages: 

Chief Librarian 9,833.00 

Salaries & Wages 26,360.20 36,193.20 
Expenses: 

Paul Pratt Memorial Library 8,000.00 
Books, Magazines and Non-Print media 6,076.36 

Office Supplies and Expenses 1,148.41 

Maintenance Expenses 839.33 

Heat 228.73 

Electricity 408.73 

Travel Expenses 128.64 

Insurance 1,041.30 

Telephone 260.54 

Out of State Travel 150.00 18,282.04 



Nantasket Branch Library 



2,000.00 



From Library Trust Fund Income: 

Books, Magazines and Non-Print Media 



1,800.00 



58,275.24 



Town Common and Parks 
Salaries and Wages 
Expenses: 



9,415.08 



Equipment and Supplies 


82.58 




Repairs to Mowers 


307.07 




Gas and Oil for Mowers 


84.33 




Fertilizer 


225.00 




Truck Allowance 


300.00 


998.98 


Recreation and Playgrounds 






Salaries and Wages 




3,748.04 


Expenses: 






Beechwood Ball Field 






Maintenance - Contractor 


140.00 




Contract Mowing 


350.00 




Milliken Bancroft Field 






Repairs to Mowers 


46.88 




Gas and Oil for Mowers 


9.36 




Equipment and Supplies 


209.48 




Maintenance - Contractor 


94.00 




Tennis Court Supphes 


157.00 




Harold F. Barnes Field 






Contract Mowing 


350.00 




Maintenance of Grounds 


170.00 




Electricity - Skating Rinks 


74.79 


1,601.51 


Summer Program 






Wages 


2,281.35 




Supplies 


134.25 


2,415.60 


Capital Outlay: 






Barnes Field - Chain Link Fence & Gates 




1,978.00 


Gate 




100.00 


Osgood School Playground - Lights 




200.00 


MiUiken Field - Landscaping 




300.00 



10,414.06 



7,765.15 



2,578.00 



161 



Wadleigh Park Trust Fund Income 
Expenses: 
Labor 
Repairs to Mower 



224.52 
2.50 



227.02 



Wheelwright Park Trust Fund Income 
Expenses: 
Labor 
Sign 
Clearing Brooks and Brush 



157.36 
31.50 
52.00 



240.86 



Cedar Street Cemetery Trust Fund Income 

Wages 



61.20 



Charlotte Lincoln Bell Memorial Fund - 


Cemetery Care 






Expenses: 








Labor 




426.48 




Repairs to Mower 




2.50 


428.98 


Memorial Day and Other Legal Holiday: 


s and Celebrations 






Memorial Day 








Expenses: 








Band Services 


150.00 






Collations 


264.40 






Flags 


56.00 






Wreaths and Flowers 


159.00 






Markers 


65.73 


695.13 




Christmas Celebrations 








Expenses: 








Wages 


99.44 






Electrical Supplies 


72.00 


171.44 


866.57 


Retirement Fund to County System 




49,278.98 




Non-Contributory Pensions - Various Persons 


9,495.20 


58,774.18 


Municipal Insurance 








Fire Insurance 




11,583.80 




Workmen's Compensation 




9,538.00 




Motor Vehicles 




6,184.53 




Public Liabihty 




1,713.00 




Theft & Burglary 




857.00 




Floaters - Various Departments 




233.00 




Bonds 


*• 


483.00 




Boilers 




311.00 




Bleachers 




75.00 




Money and Securities 




194.00 


31,172.33 


Employees Group Insurance 








Life Insurance 




2,520.38 




Blue Cross - Blue Shield 




33,446.22 


35,966.60 



Town Reports 
Expenses: 

Printing Town Reports 



3,128.00 



162 



Other Reports for Town Meeting 32.50 

Delivering Town Reports 265.76 

Advertising 9.80 3,436.06 

Unclassified and Miscellaneous 
Town Flag 
Expenses: 

Services 50.00 

Flags 131.96 

Rope and Clips 32.50 214.46 

Damages to Persons and Property 34.00 

200th Anniversary Celebration 
Expenses: 

Catering Services 425.07 

Various Bands and Marching Units 3,989.70 

Transportation 93.41 

Printing, Postage, Advertising 167.60 

Decorations 91.50 

Reviewing Stand, Lighting, etc. 238.70 

Prizes 93.80 5,099.78 

Council for Aging 
Expenses 

Telephone 154.46 

Postage 121.84 

Office Supplies and Expenses 53,65 

Custodian 21.00 

Social Activities 157.59 508.54 

Article 49, March 1970 - Veterans' War Memorial 
Expenses: 

Masonry Work - Contractor 4,445 .00 

Bronze Plaques 1,125.00 

Flag Poles (2) 199.00 

Flags 138.00 

Advertising 34.30 

Flowers 114.00 

Miscellaneous 114.17 

Landscaping and other Site Work 322.00 6,49 1.47 

Town Buildings 
Expenses: 

North Cohasset Post Office & Fire Station Bldg. 



Water Services 


48.97 






Repairs 


993.15 


1,042.12 




Government Island Real Estate 








Repairs 


110.09 






Water Services 


208.48 


318.57 




Guild Hall Building 








Repairs 


19.50 






Fuel 


439.17 


458.67 




Capital Outlay - Government Lsland 








Improvement of Grounds, etc. 




513.00 




Bates Building - Painting Exterior 




2,000.00 


4,332.36 



163 



Parking Places Maintenance 

Rubbish Removal - Sandy Beach 205.00 



Water Department 








Salaries and Wages: 








Salary of Superintendent 


10,813.73 






Office Wages 


4,878.65 






Wages 


44,321.60 






Overtime 


6,100.53 


66,114.51 




Expenses: 








Administration 








Printing 


791.61 






Office Supplies and Expenses 


823.29 






Telephones 


509.64 






Addressograph Services 


51.07 






Maintenance of Billing Machine 


120.00 






Electricity 


126.23 






Fuel 


397.46 






N.C.R. Adding Machine No.8622433 


' 125.55 






Travel 


34.35 






Dues and Subscriptions 


67.00 


3,046.20 




General 








Pipe and Fittings 


1,742.61 






Meters and Fittings 


2,399.74 






Insurance 


3,722.00 






Repairs and Maintenance 


365.70 


8,230.05 




Service Connections 








Pipe and Fittings 


1,702.65 






Repairs and Maintenance 


323.97 


2,026.62 




Pumping Station 








Fuel 


717.37 






Supplies 


1,489.68 






Repairs to Buildings 


146.18 






Electricity 


8,142.28 


10,495.51 




Purification 








Supplies 


6,932.10 






Maintenance 


785.61 


7,717.71 




Maintenance of Trucks and Equipment 








Gas and Oil 


877.25 






Repairs and Maintenance 


1,061.21 






Insurance 


748.14 


2,686.60 




Capital Outlay: 








1970 Dodge D-300 Truck less trade-in of 






1962 International Truck 




3,500.00 




Other Expenses: 








Blue Cross -Blue Shield 


1,550.82 






Group Insurance 


97.80 






County Retirement 


3,200.00 


4,848^2 




Debt Services: 








Interest 


6,160.75 






Maturing Debt 


35,000.00 


41,160.75 


149,826.57 


Cemeteries 








Superintendent's Wages 


5,030.23 







164 



Wages: 

Woodside Cemetery 
Beechwood Cemetery 
Woodside Cemetery 
Expenses: 
Electricity 
Loam 

Tools and Supplies 
Repairs - Water Pipe> 
Repairs to Mowers 
Gas and Oil 
Truck Expenses 
Beechwood Cemetery 
Expenses: 

Repairs to Mower 
Tools and Supplies 
Gas and Oil 
Loam 
Capital Outlay: 

3/4 h.p. Pump for Well 



1,305.24 
706.95 



23.78 
98.00 

226.52 
24.00 
62.65 

1 19.97 
24.50 



10.00 

14.11 

1.20 

25.00 



7,042.42 



629.73 



199.00 



Cemeteries - Veterans' Graves 
Cohasset Central Cemetery 



1,250.00 



Cemeteries - Perpetual Care - Woodside from Trust Fund Income 
Salary - Superintendent 1,602.41 

Accrued Interest paid on Securities 

Returned to Principal Account 221.01 

Beechwood Cemetery I'rom Trust lund Income 

Wages 
Article 29, March 1959 -Transfer of Beechwood 

Cemetery to Town 

Legal Services 
Improvement and Enlargement of Woodside Cemetery 

Article 38, 1969, Article 21, 1970 

Advertising 9.80 

Landscaping New Area - Contractor 2,198.70 



1,823.42 



204.00 



652.00 



2,208.50 



14,009.07 



Interest 

Anticipation of Revenue 

Schools- Bond Issues 

Schools - Anticipation of Serial Issues 

Police and lire Headquarters BIdg. 

Sewerage 

Tax Abatements 

Anticipation of Highway Reimbursement 



44,429.16 

98,200.00 

3,754.06 

3,720.00 

12,600.00 

27.00 

80.00 



162.810.22 



Municipal Indebtedness- Except Water 
Temporary Loans 
Anticipation 
Revenue 
Serial Issue 

Highway Reimbursement 
Maturing Debt 
Schools 



1 ,600,000.00 

131,000.00 

8,000.00 

231,000.00 



165 



Police & File Headquarters Building 10,000.00 

Sewerage 20,000.00 

Bond Issue Expenses 868.50 2,000,868.50 

Refunds and Adjustments 

Taxes - Real Estate and Personal 19,282.35 

Motor Excise 7,988.15 

Water Rates 572.42 

Mooring Fees 35.00 

Dog License 2.00 

Blue Cross - Blue Shield 147.75 

Accrued Interest Land Acquisition Bonds 837.31 
Adjustments: 

Blue Cross - Blue Shield 2,305.78 

Federal Withholding Taxes 15,099.22 

Life Insurance 156.17 

Teachers' Annuities 298.50 

State Withholding Taxes 785.64 

Teachers' Retirement 116.90 

Payroll Exchange 432.79 48,059.98 

State and County Assessments 

State Recreation Areas 14,619.93 

Metropolitan Parks 2,302.91 

State Assessment System 262.36 

Motor Vehicle Excise Tax Bills 700.05 
Health Insurance State Elderly 

Governmental Retiree Program 196.68 

MetropoUtan Area Planning Council 484.9 1 

Mass. Bay Transportation Authority 19,385.35 

Audit of Municipal Accounts 7,048.9 J 

County Tax 78,868.53 

County Hospital 6,967.06 130,836.69 

Trusts 

Woodside Cemetery Perpetual Care 2,375.00 

James W. Nichols School Prize Fund 50.00 

Major WilHam Arthur Scholarship Fund 500.00 
Conservation Fund - Professional Services re 

Open-space and Recreation Plan 1,444.00 4,369.00 

Agency 

Pay Roll Dedyctions: 

Federal Withheld Taxes 327,376.86 

State Withheld Taxes 62,726.01 

Blue Cross - Blue Shield 36,462.59 

Retirement - County 39,437.14 

Life Insurance 2,624.28 

Annuity - Teachers 7,490.00 

Retirement - Teachers 62,707.83 

Dues - Teachers 2,860.00 

Dog Licenses to County 1,770.50 

Tailings 30.30 543,485.51 



166 



Stabilization Fund - Article 13, 1970 
Conservation Fund - Article 6, 1970 

Total Expenditures 



25,000.00 
5,000.00 30,000.00 

$6,318,856.07 



Cash Balance January 1, 197 
Total Receipts 

Total Warrants 

Cash Balance January 1, 1971 



Summary 

$ 301,580.14 
6,410,850.49 
6,712,430.63 
6,318,856.07 

$ 393,574.56 



TRUST FUNDS IN CUSTODY OF TOWN TREASURER 
AS OF JANUARY 1, 1970 



Parks and Playgrounds 

Arthur N. Milliken Fund 
Robert Charles Billings Fund: 

Town Common 
Billings - Pratt Park Fund 
H. W. Wadleigh Park Fund 
Wheelwright Park Fund 
Edith M. Bates Town Pond and 

Common Fund 





Interest & 


Transfer 




Balance 


Dividends 


to Town 


Balance 


1/1/70 


1970 


1970 


12/1/70 



;105.05 



$5.60 



$110.65 



1,150.00 


60.36 


60.36 


1,150.00 


1,000.00 


52.52 


52.52 


1,000.00 


5,000.00 


262.52 


262.52 


5,000.00 


5,000.00 


787.52 


787.52 


15,000.00 


1,658.59 


88.78 


- ■ 


1,747.37 



Cemeteries 

Perpetual Care Woodside Cemetery 
Cohasset Savings Bank 
Lots added in 1970 
Accrued interest paid on 
New England Power Co. 1st 
Mortgage Bonds returned to 
Fund 



25M New England Power Co. 1st 
Mortgage par 100 due 9/1/99, 
8-3/8% 

Perpetual Care - Beechwood Cemetery: 

Cedar Street Cemetery: 

Charlotte Lincoln Bell Memorial Fund: 

Schools 

Ripley Fund: 

James W. Nichols School Prize Fund: 



3,207.74 
2,375.00 



221.01 



5,803.75 


214.61 
(221.01) 


214.61 


5,803.75 


25,221.01 


2,093.75 


2,093.75 


25,000.00 


5,230.58 


275.61 


370.34 


5.135.85 


1,082.38 


57.93 


•• • 


1,140.31 


15,923.81 


842.00 


400.00 


16,365.81 


1,267.51 


67.84 




1.335.35 


2,965.13 


156.76 


50.00 


3,071.89 



167 



Major William Arthur Scholarship 
Fund: 

Other 

Post War Rehabilitation Fund: 
War Memorial Fund: 
Stabilization Fund: 

Transfer from Town Appropriation 

1970 



Conservation Fund 

Transfer from Town Appropriation 
1970 



Cohasset Free Public Library 

Funds and Securities transferred to Town 
Treasurer by Treasurer of Cohasset 
Free Public Library in accordance with 
Chapter 361 Acts of 1970 - as of June 12 
1970 

Gbhasset Savings Bank 

East Weymouth Savings 

Quincy Savings Bank 

New England Merchants National Bank 
checking account closed out by 
Town Treasurer and deposited in 



Hingham Institution for Savings 

$2,476.23* 2,560.00 

Transfer 2,476.23* 



6,681.77 


344.52 


500.00 


6,526.29 


694.55 


37.17 




731.72 


1,296.09 


34.24 


1,330.33 


-- 


103,179.64 








7,5.000 00 








128,179.64 


6,494.77 


-- 


134,674.41 


16,658.27 








5,000.00 


1,027.48 


1,444.00 


21,241.75 


21,658.27 









9,372.23 


257.40 


257.40 


9,372.23 


4,146.82 


114.02 


114.02 


4,146.82 


3,606.24 


99.62 


99.62 


3,606.24 



5,036.23 93.10 893.10 4,236.23 



Securities 

Commonwealth Edison Co. 4-1/4 - 1987 
Mountain States Tel. & Tel. 4-3/8 - 1988 
New York Central R.R. 201 3 

Pacific Gas & Electric Co. 4-1/2 - 1986 



108 shares First National Bank of ) 

Boston ) 

34 shares State Street Bank & Trust ) 

Co, of Boston ) 

Book Value ) 



5,000.00 


106.25 


106.25 




4,000.00 


87.52 


87.52 




1,500.00 


37.50 


37.50 




3,000.00 


67.50 


67.50 




13,500.00 






13,500.00 




159.30 


159.30 






40.80 


40.80 




2,940.87 






2,940.87 
282,837.54 



168 



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TOWN OF COHASSET 

Balance Sheet December 31, 1970 
General Accounts 

Assets 



Cash - General 



$393,574.56 



Accounts Receivable Taxes: 
Levy of 1961 thru 1968 Tax 

Judgements 
Levy of: 



311.08 



1967 Personal Property 


69.00 




1968 Personal Property 


592.80 




1969 Personal Property 


467.96 




1969 Real Estate 


10,635.53 




1970 Personal Property 


2,087.11 




1970 Real Estate 


129,066.42 


143,229.90 


Motor Vehicle and Trailer Excise: 






Levy of: 






1966 


24.15 




1969 


526.42 




1970 


22,052.03 


22,602.60 


Tax Titles and Possessions: 






Titles 


28,994.08 




Possessions 


2,204.25 


31,198.33 


Departmental 






Veterans' Assistance 


3,686.56 




Schools 


222.22 




Rental of Property 


90.00 




Cemetery - Sale of Lots and Graves 


87.30 




Police Dept. - Ambulance Service 


780.00 




Harbor Dept. - 1970 Mooring Fees_ 


10.00 


4,876.08 


Aid to Highways: 






State 


37,155.09 




County 


18,577.55 


55,732.64 


Aid - Sewer Construction 






Federal Grants 


60,840.00 




State Grants 


33,664.00 


94,504.00 


Water Department: 






Miscellaneous 1965 


247.14 




Liens 1969 


305.57 




Meters 1970 


19,986.88 




MisceUaneous 1970 


72.10 




Liens 1970 


1,542.94 


22,154.63 



181 



Loans Authorized: 






Sewerage System - Phase 1 


191,000.00 




Water Department - Plans & 






Specifications 


64,000.00 




Sewerage System - Phase II 


380,550.00 


635,550.00 


Underestimates 1970: 






State Parks and Reservations 


1,083.82 




Metropolitan Parks 


19.95 




Metropolitan Area Planning Council 162.30 


1,266.07 



$1,404,688.81 



Liabilities and Reserves 

Payroll Deductions: 

Blue Cross - Blue Shield $ 3,595.80 

Life Insurance 308.39 $ 3,904.19 

Agency: 

Excess - Sale Lands of Low 

Value 822.82 

Cemetery Perpetual Care Funds 300.00 1,122.82 

Tailings - Unclaimed Checks 622.04 

Gifts: 

Paul Pratt Memorial Library 
Fund - Chapter 361, Acts 



6,058.14 



of 1970 


3,839.48 


Beechwood Cemetery Asso- 




ciation Funds - Chapter 




370, Acts of 1952 


2,218.66 


Trust Fund Income: 




Cohasset Free PubUc Library 


63.01 


Wheelwright Park 


2,373.07 


Wadleigh Park 


490.45 


Charlotte Lincoln Bell 




Memorial Fund - 


« 


Cemetery Care 


32.10 


Cedar Street Cemetery Care 


54.97 


Woodside Cemetery - 




Perpetual Care 


1,056.16 


Beechwood Cemetery - 




Perpetual Care 


166.34 


Town Common and Parks 


217.68 



Federal Grants: 
Schools: 

Public Law 85-864 -Title III 2,584.81 

Public Law 85-864 - Title V 1,143.15 

182 



4,453.78 



Public Law 81-874 


16,874.47 


Public Law 89-10 -Title I 


4,970.51 


Public Law 89-10 - Title II 


26.19 



25,599.13 



State Grant - Metco Students - 

Chapter 506, Acts of 1966 2,394.78 



Revolving Funds: 



School Lunches 


2,582.18 




School Athletics 


3,928.49 


6,510.67 


Appropriation Balances: 






Revenue - General 


52,498.86 




Non Revenue - Bond Issues: 






Addition to Jr-Sr High School 






& Remodeling 


1,526.70 




Sewer Construction 


54,610.50 


108,636.06 


Loans Authorized and Unissued 




635,550.00 



Overestimates 1970: 

County Tax 4,341.59 

Mass Bay Transportation Authorit y 201.65 4,543.24 

Sale of Real Estate Fund: 

General 1,914.93 

Town Farm Veterans' Housing 3,650.00 5,564.93 

Sale of Cemetery Lots Fund: 

Beechwood Cemetery 323.50 

Woodside Cemetery 6,985.65 7,309.15 

Receipts Reserved for Appropriation: 

Dept. of Community Affairs - Aging 350.00 

State Aid for Libraries 1,460.00 

Shellfish Propagation 600.00 2,410.00 

Reserve Fund - Overlay Surplus 8,306.96 



Overlays Reserved for Abatements: 






Levy of: 






1968 


200.00 




1969 


2,680.28 




1970 


12,869.56 


15,749.84 


Revenue Reserved Until Collected: 






Motor Vehicle 


22,602.60 




Tax Titles and Possessions 


31,198.33 




Departmental 


4,876.08 




Water Department 


22,154.63 




Aid to Highway 


55,732.64 




Aid - Sewerage Construction 


94,504.00 


231,068.28 



183 



Surplus Revenue: 
General 
Water 



319,396.50 
15,488.30 



334,884.80 



$1,404,688.81 



Submitted by, 

WILLIAM S. SIGNORELLI 

Town Accountant 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF ASSESSORS - 1970 



Our 1970 financial report is as follows: 



Total Valuation, 1969 

Total Valuation, 1970 

Plus Omitted Assessments 

Increase in Valuation 

Town Grant, Annual Town Meeting, 
March 7, 1970 

Amounts required to be Raised: 
School Lunch 
Free PubUc Libraries 
Racial Imbalance Program 

County Tax and Assessments 
County Tax 
County Hospital 

State Tax and Assessments 

State Recreation Areas 

Audit of Municipal Accounts 

Metropolitan Districts Area 

Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority 

Elderly Retiree Program 

Motor Vehicle Excise Tax Bills 

State Assessment System 

Metropolitan Area Planning Council 

Underestimates of 1969 

State Recreation Areas 
Metropolitan Districts Area 

Overlay of Current Year 

GROSS AMOUNT TO BE RAISED 





20,078,467.63 


20,659,147.60 




2,775.00 




20,661,922.69 






583,455.06 




3,605,634.21 


11,971.99 




1,460.00 




7,500.00 


20,931.99 


83,210.12 




6,967.06 


90,177.18 


13,536.11 




7,048.91 




2,282.96 




19,587.00 




196.68 




700.05 




262.36 




322.61 


43,936.68 


261.39 




101.19 


362.58 




108,125.77 




3,919,969.72 



184 



ESTIMATED RECEIPTS AND AVAILABLE FUNDS 

ESTIMATED RECEIPTS 

1970 Estimated Receipts as certified by the 

Commissioner on Cherry Sheet 434,1 1 3.42 

Motor Vehicle and Trailer Excise 197,000.00 

Licenses 12,000.00 

Fines 800.00 

School (local receipts of School Committee) 500.00 

Interest - On Taxes and Assessments 3,800.00 

Rents 3,900.00 

Water Department Offset 153,023.68 

TOTAL ESTIMATED RECEIPTS 



AVAILABLE FUNDS TO BE USED 

Overestimate of 1969 to be used as 
Available Funds 
County Tax 
Massachusetts Bay 
Transportation Authority 



1,305.24 



5.81 



1,311.05 



Amounts voted to be taken from Available Funds 

Article 49 - War Memorial Fund 1,330.33 

Article 8 - Dog Fund, County 835.28 

Article 9 - Reserve Fund, Overlay Surplus 6,052.73 

Article 16 - State Aid, Libraries 1,460.00 

Article 21 - Sale of Cemetery Lots Fund 4,000.00 

Article 24 - State Aid, Shellfish Propagation 200.00 

Article 26 - Surplus Revenue 5,000.00 

Article 39 - Water Department, Available Surplus 10,000.00 

Special Town Meeting, December 2, 1969 
Article 1 - Surplus Revenue 2,500.00 

Article 2 - Surplus Revenue 5,922.97 

Article 3 -Water Department, Available Surplus 
Article 7 - Surplus Revenue 6,500.00 

TOTAL AVAILABLE FUNDS 

TOTAL ESTIMATED RECEIPTS AND 
AVAILABLE FUNDS 



Gross Amount to be Raised 



Total Estimated Receipts 
Total Available Funds 



805,137.10 
52,112.36 



NET AMOUNT TO BE RAISED BY 
TAXATION ON PROPERTY 



185 



NET AMOUNT TO BE RAISED BY TAXATION 

Total Valuation, Real Estate 

$19,546,420.00 @ $148.25 2,S91,156.16 

Total Valuation, Personal Property 

$1,112,727.69 @ $148.25 164,961.88 

Gain on Account of Fractional Divisions of Tax Rate 1.62 

TOTAL TAXES LEVIED ON PROPERTY 3,062,720.26 

Number of bills on Personal Estate 414 

Number of bills on Real Estate 2,790 

Total Number of Bills 3,204 

Number of Horses Assessed 26 

Number of Ponies Assessed 1 

Number of Cows Assessed 3 

Number of Acres of Land Assessed 4,086 

Number of Dwelling Houses Assessed 1,982 

ABATEMENTS OF TAXES GRANTED DURING 1970 

LEVY OF THE YEAR 1966 

Motor Vehicle and Trailer Excise 34.65 

LEVY OF THE YEAR 1967 

Real Estate Tax 46.00 

LEVY OF THE YEAR 1968 

Motor Vehicle and Trailer Excise 403.16 

LEVY OF THE YEAR 1969 

Personal Property Tax 158.02 

Real Estate Tax 1,877.93 

Motor Vehicle and Trailer Excise 11,724.59 

LEVY OF THE YEAR 1970 

Personal Property Tax 3,151.14 

Real Estate Tax 92,105.07 

Motor Vehicle and Trailer Excise 16,9 38.94 



During 1970 the entire town of Cohasset has been revalued by a professional firm 
of appraisers, Francis L. Logue and Associates of Nonvell. Each parcel of real estate, both 
residential and commercial, has been photographed, measured and thoroughly inspected 
from top to bottom to determine the fair market value. 

Their recommendations will be reviewed by the Board of Assessors. These new valu- 
ations will reflect the conditions as of January 1, 1971, and will be the basis for the 1971 
tax bills. 

We are pleased to announce that the valuation list and the tax billing will be done 
by conputer. This will result, in a great saving to the town for two reasons. It will elimi- 



186 



nate the cost and the time involved in typing the biUs and the Hsts required by Massachu- 
setts law. The bills being ready and in the hands of the taxpayers earlier will result in a flow 
of money wWch should lessen the amount the Treasurer has to borrow in anticipation of 
taxes and save interest payments. 

The Assessors would like at this time to thank the townspeople for the fine coopera- 
tion given to Mr. Logue and his men. 



COHASSET FREE PUBUC UBRARY 

CFPL TRUST FUNDS TRANSFERRED TO TOWN TREASURER JUNE 12, 1 970 

Total $38,602.39 

East Weymouth Savings Bank 

Wadleigh Fund Acct. SN704 4,146.82 

COHASSET FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY 
CFPL TRUST FUNDS TRANSFERRED TO TOWN TREASURER JUNE 12, 1970 

$ 38,602.39 

East Weymouth Savings Bank 

Wadleigh Fund Acct. SN704 4,146.82 

Quincy Savings Bank 

Stoddard Fund Acct. 100146 3,606.24 

Hingham Savings Bank 

General Fund Acct. N765 2,560.00 

Cohasset Savings Bank 

Edith Mason Bates Fund Acct. 13062 112.95 

Mary I. Williams Fund Acct. 1-000214 1,597.03 

Alexander Williams Fund Acct. 1-000215 693.06 

Knowles Fund Acct. 1-000216 1,319.09 

Florence N. Bates Fund Acct. 1-000217 3,462.11 

Stoddard Fund Acct. 1-000218 2,071.87 

Wadleigh Fund Acct. 14875 116.12 



19,685. 



SECUWTIES 

Commonwealth Edison (5) IM. No. M8374-M8378 

March 1, 1987 5,000.00 

Mt. States Tel. & Tel. (4) IM. No. M 19-975-19-978 

February 1, 1988 4,000.00 

Pacific Gas «& Electric (3) IM. No. M17777-17778, 21121 

December 1, 1986 3,000.00 



187 



New York Central (1) IM No. M35730 

October 1, 2013 
New York Central (1) 500.00 No. D235 

October 1, 2013 



108 Shares First National Bank of Boston 

52044 (12); SD69693 (36); SD34214 (9); 318888 (1) 

294466 (3); 361466 (7); 244173 (20); 208437 (20) 

34 Shares State Street Bank & Trust Co. of Boston 
22844 (33); 50060 (1) 

BOOK VALUE 

Checking Acct. New England Merchants Bank 



1,000.00 
500.00 



2,940.87 
2,476.23 



STATEMENT OF INCOME & EXPENDITURES 
FROM JANUARY 10, 1970 TO JUNE 12, 1970 



Cash on Hand January 1, 1970 

Income 

Gift of Benj. Blake 

Investments & Savings Bank Interest 

Allowance on Old Projector 



509.35 



3,500.00 



38,602.39 



276.00 




1,104.38 




350.00 


1,730.38 


1,730.38 


2,239.73 



Expenditures 

Lehre Barnes Treas. Bond 
Travelers Ind. Co. Bond for 

Missing Certificate 
Safe Deposit Box 



Add 300 Carried in Checking Acct. 
Balance June 12, 1970 



31.00 

25.00 

7.50 

63.50 



63.50 
2,176.23 

300.00 

2,476.23 



Respectfully Submitted, 
LLOYD C. TROTT, Treasurer 



INDEX 

Assessors, Board of 1 84 

Building Code Committee 101 

Cohasset Free Public Library, Treasurer 187 

Collector of Taxes 139 

Conservation Commission 96 

Committee to Study Administrative Functions 94 

Council on Aging 116 

Fire Department 96 

Government Land Committee 117 

Harbor Master 135 

Health Department 130 

Highway Department 112 

Housing Authority 1 05 

Report of the Librarian 136 

Jury List 18 

Moth Superintendent 1 00 

Personnel Committee 108 

Planning Board 104 

Police Department 109 

Recreation Commission 138 

Registrars, Board of 93 

School Department 118 

School Committee 118 

Superintendent's Report 1 14 1 25 

School Facilities Committee 94 

School Shore Regional School District 99 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 93 

Selectmen, Board of 108 

Sewer Commissioners 1 06 

Shellfish Constable 104 

Staff Directory 120 

Mosquito Control, Town of Cohasset 98 

Town Accountant 142 

Receipts 143 

Expenditures 148 

Trust Funds 167 

Statement of Town Debt 169 

Summary of appropriations and Other Accounts 1 74 

Balance Sheet, General Accounts 181 

Town Clerk 

Officers and Committes 7 

Annual Town Meeting March 7 20 

Town Election March 14 68 

State Election November 3 75 

Vital Statistics 77 



189 



Town Treasurer 142 

Tree Warden 129 

Water Commissioners 106 

Wire Department 134 

Veteran's Memorial Committee 102 



190 



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